Events


Annual Purchase Award

Monday, November 1st, 2010 - Sunday, November 1st, 2015, 9-5 Monday-Friday

Emeryville City Hall
1333 Park Blvd.

In Emeryville

The lobby of City Hall in Emeryville serves as an emerging gallery of local artworks.  Since 2005, the City has acquired one work which was selected from the Annual Emeryville Celebration of the Arts Exhibit held each October.  The juried exhibit showcases the work of the many professional artists who live and work here.  With a long tradition of artists cooperative housing, Emeryville is home to large number of artists, in fact, Emeryville may boast one of the most dense artists populations per capita in the Bay Region.  Past Purchase Award acquisitions include paintings by Canan Tolon and Michael Murphy, textile by Ana Lisa Hedstrom, light sculpture by Therese Lahaie and a ceramic wall hanging by Cuong Ta.  All the works as well as installations in and around City Hall such as Roger Berry's Solar Rose can be viewed suring normal business hours when City Hall is open to the public.  Please visit soon!


Persistence of Vision: Art by Jon Steven Walters

Thursday, January 1st, 2015 - Saturday, February 28th, 2015, 1/1/15, 6-9PM

Gallery @ Panorama Framing
3350 Grand Avenue

In Oakland

Join us Jan 1st 2015 for the premiere of Persistence of Vision: Art by Jon Steven Walters. We're planning a synesthetic extravaganza! New Years’ Day = New art, live ♫ Contemporary Jazz, [sparkling] wine and [yummy, hot] finger-foods in the Gallery @ Panorama Framing.

Persistence of Vision: Art by Jon Steven Walters

You are invited to imagine a universe where memories are not tethered by time, space or even eyesight – but in retinal images evoking the knowledge that what we think we see is not all there is to see. A flash of red through a hazy mix of grey/blue, the unexpected black line, all meant to surprise, jar or spark a feeling; the soft over-painting asking the viewer to come closer and explore beneath the surface.

Walters’ technique juxtaposes mixed layers of media, colors and shapes to transform figures into skewed afterimages harnessed in layers of translucent paint. Harking back to inspiration from the Bay Area Figurative Movement of the 1950s-60s, Walters’ spin on figuration builds depth through each layer of media, largely obscuring the under-painting creating an ethereal mix of trans-lucid landscapes on clay board canvases.

“Color is critically important, especially with my current technique of layers and layers of washes over a heavy and chaotic under painting,” says Walters. Like a distant memory Walters aims to uncover his assemblages and blur the lines between figuration and abstraction. Each work is a mnemonic device in its own right: each composition related to a memory – translated by means of tactile layering and Walters’ Persistence of Vision.

Born in Oakland in 1958, Jon Steven Walters grew up in Castro Valley and has lived in the Bay Area his whole life. Walters received his BFA in illustration from the Academy of Art University SF graduated in 1989 and a Master of Fine Arts in Studio Art from John F. Kennedy University in Berkeley in 2008.

HERE: The 2014 BAC Artists Annual Part II

Saturday, January 10th, 2015 - Sunday, February 8th, 2015, 5pm - 8pm

Berkeley Art Center
1275 Walnut Street

In Berkeley

HERE: The 2014 BAC Artists Annual, An Exhibition in Two Parts
Opening Reception: Saturday, November 15, 5-8pm
Exhibition Dates: November 15- December 14
Full list of Part I artists*

Berkeley Art Center presents, HERE: The 2014 BAC Artists Annual, An Exhibition in Two Parts. Here: Part I is a non-juried presentation, followed byHere: Part II, curated by Aimee Friberg, director of CULT Exhibitions in San Francisco. Friberg will select outstanding artists from Part I of the exhibition who will then be invited to showcase a larger body of work in Part II. This unique exhibition experience will allow new perspectives on the broad and deep BAC artist communities.

HERE: The 2014 BAC Artists Annual Part II
Opening Reception: Saturday, January 10, 5-8pm
Exhibition Dates: January 10-February 8, 2015

Berkeley Art Center would like to congratulate the HERE: Part II exhibiting artists.
Mariet Braakman
Sabine Reckewell
Afton Love
Amy Nathan
Joyce Nojima
*Pick up for HERE: Part I artists is Thursday - Saturday, December 18-20 from 11am - 5pm. Thank you.

19th Annual The Art of Living Black

Saturday, January 10th, 2015 - Friday, February 27th, 2015, Tue-Sat, 10am – 5pm; Sun 12 – 5pm

Richmond Art Center
2540 Barrett Ave

In Richmond

The Richmond Art Center is proud to host the only annual, non-juried exhibition in the Bay Area to exclusively feature regional artists of African descent. Works by over 50 local artists in a wide variety of media, including painting, drawing, photography, jewelry and metal arts, ceramics and much more. This exhibition will feature works by the 2014 Jan Hart-Schuyers Award winners: Asual Aswad, Yolanda Holley, Atiba Sylvia Thomas and Lawrence Buford.

Richmond Art Center Faculty Show

Saturday, January 10th, 2015 - Saturday, March 7th, 2015, Tue-Sat, 10am – 5pm; Sun 12 – 5pm

Richmond Art Center
2540 Barrett Ave

In Richmond

The Richmond Art Center has a long and rich history of inspiring students of all ages. This exhibition celebrates the unique and diverse work of the Art Center’s faculty—a talented group of professional artist-instructors who inspire creativity in students of all ages. Featured media include ceramics, weaving, fiber arts, screen printing, painting, drawing, printmaking and more.

Yisrael K. Feldsott: Annunciating Obscurities

Saturday, January 10th, 2015 - Saturday, March 7th, 2015, Tue-Sat, 10am – 5pm; Sun 12 – 5pm

Richmond Art Center
2540 Barrett Ave

In Richmond

Featuring works from the 1970s to the present that showcase the artist’s exploration of the formal potentials of disparate materials to portray the gamut of the human experience. Feldsott's work is influenced by his time immersed in the traditions of indigenous communities in Central and South America, where he became a shaman and championed environmental issues.

There Goes the Bride

Friday, January 23rd, 2015 - Saturday, February 21st, 2015, Jan 23-24, 8pm; Jan 30-31, 8pm; Feb 1, 2pm; Feb 6-7, 8pm; Feb 8, 2pm; Feb 13-14, 8pm; Feb 15, 2pm; Feb 20-21, 8pm

Masquers Playhouse
105 Park Place

In

Timothy Westerby is overworked, underpaid, stressed-out, and his daughter is getting married in what he thinks is an overly-lavish and expensive ceremony. Timothy is ripe for a nervous breakdown-and, on the morning of the wedding, he has one...

Cooney and Chapman are masters of the British farce: fiendishly clever comedies filled with surprises, combining good-natured bawdiness with inspired mayhem. There Goes the Bride shows them at the top of their game, creating a web of tall tales, mistaken identities, and outrageous twists that will have you howling. Directed by Angela Mason.

Featuring Giorgia Ghizzoni, Norman Macleod, Shay Oglesby-Smith, Simon Patton, Michael Sally, Sarah Sloan, Carl Smith, Loralee Windsor.

Presented by Masquers Playhouse.

$22.

The Mysterium Show

Saturday, January 24th, 2015 - Saturday, January 31st, 2015, Saturdays, Jan 24th & 31st at 8pm

The old Victorian theater above the Fat Lady Bar and Restaurant
201 Washington Street

In Oakland

The Mysterium Show: An evening of elegant supernatural entertainment

To the seekers of the strange and the friends of the freakish: The Mysterium Theater opens its doors January 24th, 2015 in the historic Victorian parlour overlooking Jack London Square. For tickets ($20, adults only) and information, visit www.MysteriumShow.com

The theater is located in the historic parlour above The Fat Lady Bar & Restaurant in Jack London Square. Its elegant, haunting Victorian ambience transports guests of the Mysterium to another time and place. Constructed in 1884, the building is one of the original residents of Jack London Square; it has a rich, colorful history that some claim is carried on by the spirits that reside there still.

The Mysterium Show is an invitation to a wild and delightful celebration of the supernatural - an opportunity to experience the strangest excitements and explore the boundaries of possibility. Minds will be read and spirits will be summoned! It's a fascinating exploration of magic and perception that goes beyond "tricks and illusions". In the Mysterium, audience members aren't just observers - they help create the magic. "You won't just be amazed; you'll be left with the feeling that you've been a part of something very special" says Erica Valen.

"We've spent much of our lives seeking the heart of the mystical experience," says Boudreau. "The Mysterium is an opportunity for us to combine that knowledge with our skills in sleight of hand and magical theater to create some very beautiful and meaningful moments. Every element of the show has been handcrafted with this sensibility in mind. The goal of the Mysterium Show is to put the wonder and mystery back into the performance of magic."

Presented by Mysterium Productions.

$20. 18+.

Family Concert: The Bobs (Oakland)

Sunday, January 25th, 2015 - Sunday, January 25th, 2015, 1/25/15, 12:00 PM - 12:45 PM

Oakland Asian Cultural Center
388 9th St., Suite 290

In Oakland

The San Francisco Chamber Orchestra's innovative, admission-free Family Concert series presents its second program of the 2014-2015 season. These 45-minute programs, designed for young listeners as well as adults learning about classical music, are the cornerstone of the SFCO's educational programming and have been greeted with capacity crowds and enthusiastic responses from our audiences all season.

This original "band without instruments" has been skewering the classics and breaking all the rules for over 30 years. Join the excitement as the Bobs collide with the San Francisco Chamber Orchestra and sparks begin to fly. Singing and being silly-what could be more fun than that?!

Hosted by SFCO Music Director Benjamin Simon, this entertaining program brings music to life!

Visual delights and audience participation make these fun-loving concerts a joy for all ages! The SFCO's Family Concert series introduces Bay Area children ages three through twelve to a wide range of classical music, setting the stage for a lifelong appreciation of this engaging art form. Audience interaction is welcome and encouraged in an informal but engrossing listening experience. Questions, clapping, and sing-alongs are all common occurrences at these joyful productions.

Program is presented January 24 at 2 pm at Calvary Presbyterian Church in San Francisco, January 25 at 12 pm at the Oakland Asian Cultural Center, and January 25 at 3:30 pm at the Skyline College Theater. Visit thesfco.org for our complete schedule.

Admission is free, but donations are gladly accepted. The San Francisco Chamber Orchestra's Family Concert series is a fully professional production. Seating is first come, first served (no tickets or reservations are issued). Doors open 30 minutes before each performance time.

Presented by San Francisco Chamber Orchestra.

No charge.

Sabrina (Billy Wilder; US, 1954)

Sunday, January 25th, 2015 - Sunday, January 25th, 2015, 4:00pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In

Six Academy Award nominations, one win!

Fresh from a Roman Holiday, Audrey Hepburn does a jaunty turn in Paris before heading back to Long Island for this scintillating Cinderella story as Sabrina, simple daughter of a family chauffeur who is transformed into a delectable sophisticate. Caught between her father’s employers, the two loaded Larrabee brothers, one a ne’er do well playboy (William Holden), the other, a sober workaholic (Humphrey Bogart), Sabrina draws on her newly found refinement, the result of some Parisian polishing, to hold the siblings at bay and bay they do. Wilder’s classic threesome is actually a foursome, the fourth being the grand gowns of Givenchy. Hepburn’s presence is like svelte, pliable architecture set in motion by this fabric maestro. Givenchy’s collaboration produced among others a black cocktail dress that became a mid-fifties rage with its high arching neckline and elegant drop to her ankles. Sabrina may have gone to a culinary academy in Paris, but at home she was a fashion plate.

• Written by Wilder, Samuel Taylor, Ernest Lehman, based on the play Sabrina Fair by Taylor. Photographed by Charles Lang, Jr. With Humphrey Bogart, Audrey Hepburn, William Holden, John Williams. (113 mins, B&W, ‘Scope, DCP, From Paramount Pictures)

In Praise of Love (Jean-Luc Godard; Switzerland/France, 2001)

Sunday, January 25th, 2015 - Sunday, January 25th, 2015, 6:30pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Jean-Luc Godard, the supreme iconoclast of the postwar generation, is still wrestling with the questions that have informed his cinema over four decades. Éloge de l’amour is his most accessible film in ten years; it is also one of the finest of his illustrious career. The first part, shot in 35mm black-and-white, takes place as a director interviews potential actors, and meets a young woman whom he feels he has known before. The second half, shot in color digital video, takes place two years earlier, when the director visits an elderly couple who are about to sell their life story of the Nazi Occupation to a Hollywood studio. As usual with Godard, plot is merely a framework on which to offer metaphysical questions about life, the world and politics. The film centers on questions of memory and the past—not surprising given its themes of the Holocaust and the Occupation. But it is also a profound reverie about Godard’s own past, giving him a chance to revisit his ’60s masterpieces, reflect on his own mortality and rage with wry humor against Hollywood and America. This film is a pinnacle in a career marked by many Everests, an affecting saga from a restless mind constantly probing for meaning everywhere.

• Written by Godard. Photographed by Julien Hirsch, Christophe Pollock. With Bruno Putzulu, Cécile Camp, Jean Davy. (97 mins, In French with English subtitles, B&W/Color, 35mm, From New Yorker Films)

THE GREAT POETS From Shakespeare to Dryden

Sunday, January 25th, 2015, 7:30pm

St. Mary Magdalen Church
2005 Berryman Street

In Berkeley

Anna Dennis, soprano
Music of Dowland, Johnson, Ferrabosco, Lanier, Danyel, Lawes & Purcell
Direct from London, soprano Anna Dennis joins Voices of Music for an evening of 17th-century Poetry and Music

Thursday January 22, 8pm
Throckmorton Theatre
142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley

Friday January 23, 8pm
All Saints Episcopal Church
555 Waverley Street, Palo Alto

Saturday January 24, 8pm
St. Mark's Lutheran Church
1111 O'Farrell Street, San Francisco

Sunday January 25, 7:30pm Berkeley St. Mary Magdalen
St. Mary Magdalen Church
2005 Berryman Street, Berkeley

ATC: Caroline Woolard, What is a Work of Art in the Age of $120,000 Degrees

Monday, January 26th, 2015 - Monday, January 26th, 2015, 1/26/15, 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

David Brower Center
2150 Allston Way

In Berkeley

Often legitimized by its relationship to elite institutions of higher education, a work of art in the United States today is a product of the classroom, the loan repayment, the lecture-hall, and the homework assignment. But before the 1950s, becoming an artist had nothing to do with a BFA or an MFA. As Mark McGurl points out in The Program Era, what is novel about our time is not that it's hard to make a living as an artist (that has always been the case), but that so many young people go to school, and often to expensive art schools, to try to become artists.

What are the implications of debt, rent, and precarity on culture in the 21st century? This talk presents recent findings about the poverty rates, rent burdens, and actual occupations of artists by BFAMFAPhD, as well as the power of solidarity art economy institutions to reproduce artists and art works that embody principles of cooperation and justice. Outlining the contradictory ways in which artists navigate solidarity economies within capitalism, the talk is an encounter with mutual aid networks, open source software, and community land trusts.

Caroline Woolard graduated from the only tuition-free art school in the United States with a strong commitment to the solidarity economy movement and to conceptual art. After co-founding and co-directing resource sharing networks OurGoods.org and TradeSchool.coop for the past five years, Woolard is focused on BFAMFAPhD.com to raise awareness about the impact of rent, debt, and precarity on culture and on New York City To Be Determined to create and support truly affordable, community land trusts for cultural resilience in New York City.

Presented by Berkeley Center for New Media/Art Techonology & Culture Colloquium [ATC].

Free and open to the public.

Nanook of the North (Robert Flaherty; US, 1922)

Tuesday, January 27th, 2015 - Tuesday, January 27th, 2015, 7:00pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

When Robert Flaherty made Nanook of the North more than ninety years ago, he opened the eyes of viewers to a new use for the big screen, and, though enacted, paved the way for the development of the film documentary. In Nanook, Flaherty directed a group of Inuit—among whom he had lived for some time as a mineralogist—going about their daily activities for his camera. The resulting saga of constant struggle against harsh elements, contrasted with the intimate warmth of a small family, remains one of the most beautiful films ever made. Nanook of the North was a worldwide success on its release, adding irony to the tragic fate of its hero, Nanook, who died shortly after the film's release.

• Written, photographed by Flaherty. (c. 85 mins @ 18 fps, Silent, B&W, 35mm, From International Film Seminars)

New Voices: African Shorts (Cameroon/Kenya/Tunisia, 2013–14)

Wednesday, January 28th, 2015 - Wednesday, January 28th, 2015, 7:00pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Every year, the African Film Festival features the voices of emerging artists from the African diaspora. In this year's selection of short narratives by women, Cameroon filmmaker Eka Christa Assam takes a quirky look at gender roles in Beleh, her short film centered on a disgruntled married couple. The Tanzanian-American filmmaker Ekwa Msangi-Omari grew up in Kenya, and lives in New York. Her short The Market King chronicles the travails of a father who takes his daughter to get her hair braided. In Tunisian director Kaouther Ben Hania's humorous recent film, a young girl goes to great lengths to avoid Koran school.

Beleh (Eka Christa Assam, Cameroon, 2013, 30 mins, In Pidgin with English subtitles, Color, Digital Video)

Soko Sonko (The Market King) (Ekwa Msangi-Omari, Kenya/US, 2014, 22 mins, In Kiswahili and Sheng with English subtitles, Color, Digital Video)

Wooden Hands (Kaouther Ben Hania, Tunisia/France, 2013, 23 mins, In Arabic with English subtitles, Color, Digital Video)

Total running time: 75 mins

Pastorale (Otar Iosseliani; USSR, 1975)

Thursday, January 29th, 2015 - Thursday, January 29th, 2015, 7:30pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

“The Soviet Republic of Georgia, located in the Caucasus, is about three hours by plane from Moscow; but from its movies Georgia seems closer to Italy. Rich in cultural detail, the best Georgian films are usually gentle satires (resembling early Olmi or the best Czech films) or poetic meditations on national traditions. Otar Iosseliani is their greatest director . . . an ironic commentator on ordinary life in a very extraordinary corner of the U.S.S.R.” (Tom Luddy, SFIFF 1983). Set in a rural Georgian village, “Pastorale is very much a tone-poem. Iosseliani’s sharp perceptions are constantly aimed toward sardonic juxtapositions, in the subtlest sense, to establish those wistful ironies of human behavior that exist when cultural patterns coexist behind invisible barriers . . . The village is not at all cozy-cute, but unflinchingly grubby; the mud, poverty, insouciant pigs, goats, and chickens, plus the eternal outhouse, are just there—the labor, too, for the women do everything without modern conveniences”.

• Written by Rezo Inanichvili, Otar Mekshrichvili, Iosseliani. Photographed by Abessalom Maisuradze. With Rezo Tsarchalachvili, Lia Tokkadse-Djiegueli, Marina Kartzevadze. (94 mins, In Georgian with English subtitles, B&W, 35mm, BAM/PFA Collection)

The Throwaways Film with Directors Bhawin Suchak & Ira McKinley

Thursday, January 29th, 2015 - Thursday, January 29th, 2015, January 29, 6:00 pm and 8:00 pm screenings

International House
2299 Piedmont Avenue

In Berkeley

KPFA Radio 94.1FM and International House, UC Berkeley, present:

THE THROWAWAYS
An award winning documentary film
With Bhawin Suchak (Director/Producer) & Ira McKinley (ex-felon & homeless filmmaker)

Tickets: 800-838-3006 or at independent bookstores, student discount at door, KPFA benefit

The Throwaways is a timely and provocative look at the impact of mass incarceration and police brutality on black men in America. Told through the eyes of homeless ex-felon Ira McKinley, the film documents his struggle to bring positive changes to his community in inner-city Albany, NY. As he strives to give voice to the people on the streets fighting for survival, McKinley confronts the stigma of being formerly incarcerated. More than an illumination of marginalized people in trouble, this film is a call to action, a narrative of engaging in the fight for justice.

"The Throwaways courageously explores the most pressing racial justice issue of our time: the mass incarceration and profiling of poor people of color."
-Michelle Alexander, author, The New Jim Crow

Featured on Democracy Now! http://www.democracynow.org/blog/2014/9/17/the_throwaways_new_film_spotlights_police

Film Festivals:
WINNER Best Documentary, Long Beach Indie Film
WINNER New York Hi-Light, Harlem International Film Festival
OFFICIAL SELECTION at eight other film festivals

Bhawin Suchak, Director/Producer
Sam Pollard, Executive Producer, an award-winning feature film and television video editor, and documentary producer/director whose career spans almost thirty years. He has edited several Spike Lee films (Four Little Girls, Jungle Fever, Mo Better Blues) and served as the producer for Henry Hampton's historical civil rights documentary Eyes On The Prize II: America at the Racial Crossroads.

Website:http://throwawaysmovie.com

Presented by KPFA Radio 94.1 FM.

$10 advance, $12 door.

A Performance and Conversation with Myra Melford

Friday, January 30th, 2015 - Friday, January 30th, 2015, 6 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.

Private residence in Berkeley
Available upon guest registration

In Berkeley

6pm: Cocktails, Food, and Meet & Greet
7pm: Performance from Life Carries Me This Way

8pm: Salon conversation with Myra Melford and Tamara Roberts

Purchase $50 ticket here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/arc-salon-conversation-and-performance-with


Join ARC for a lively evening of food, cocktails, and a special piano performance and salon conversation with UC Berkeley faculty member, composer, and Guggenheim Fellow, Myra Melford.

Start off the evening with a delicious buffet along with a signature cocktail prepared Shanna Farrell, head researcher for the “West Coast Cocktails: An Oral History” project at UC Berkeley’s Regional Oral History Office, before Melford performs music from her recent solo recording Life Carries Me This Way, work inspired by original artwork of the late Sacramento-based artist Don Reich.

After the performance, UC Berkeley Assistant Professor of Music Tamara Roberts and Melford will talk about the work, Melford’s role as a curator of New Frequencies Fest/Jazz@YBCA, and the course they co-taught on “Improvising Community” which explored community engagement through musical improvisation.

About Myra Melford: Pianist, composer and Guggenheim fellow Myra Melford draws inspiration from a vast spectrum of cultural and spiritual traditions and artistic disciplines. In 2013, she released her first solo recording, Life Carries Me This Way and premiered Language of Dreams, her most ambitious project to date, combining narration, dance, and video with music for her quintet, Snowy Egret, which has a new release coming out in March 2015 (Enja/Yellowbird). Melford also performs in the collective Trio M with bassist Mark Dresser and drummer Matt Wilson, and the duo, Dialogue, with clarinetist Ben Goldberg. In 2013, Melford was named a Guggenheim Fellow and received both the Doris Duke Performing Artist Award and a Doris Duke Residency to Build Demand for the Arts at San Francisco’s Yerba Buena Center for the Arts.

Something Necessary (Judy Kibinge; Kenya/Germany, 2013)

Friday, January 30th, 2015 - Friday, January 30th, 2015, 7:00pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Judy Kibinge's moving, beautifully filmed narrative is set in the period subsequent to the civil unrest that erupted in Kenya after the disputed 2007 elections and left over a thousand dead and hundreds of thousands displaced. A woman awakes in a hospital and learns that her husband has died in the riots, her young son is in a coma, and their farm has been destroyed. As she attempts to rebuild her life, her path crosses with that of a young man who participated in the violence. The film was released just prior to the 2013 elections, and according to the director this "meant we were confronting audiences with memories that many would rather forget."

• Written by JC Niala, Mungai Kiroga. Photographed by Yinka Edward. With Susan Wanjiru, Walter Lagat, David Koprotich, Anne Kimani. (85 mins, In Swahili with English subtitles, Color, Digital Video)

The Lost Weekend (Billy Wilder; US, 1945)

Friday, January 30th, 2015 - Friday, January 30th, 2015, 8:45pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Winner of four Academy Awards!

The Lost Weekend is probably the forties’ most famous problem picture, and today loses little of its original power. Ray Milland’s Don Birnam is a failed writer, an anxiety-prone weakling who uses alcohol as an escape. A number of short, episodic scenes mount gradually in intensity until the two climactic passages, which occur respectively in an alcoholic ward and at Birnam’s apartment during a fit of delirium tremens. Other sequences convey Birnam’s agony even better: his attempt to pawn his typewriter on Third Avenue on Yom Kippur; and, in particular, the scene in Harry and Joe’s Bar, played and directed with exemplary delicacy and finesse, in which Birnam robs a girl’s handbag, and is thrown out protesting ‘I’m not a thief!’ Wilder has seldom used his camera more daringly. Telephones, overturned lampshades and, of course, bottles loom menacingly in the foreground of the compositions, while John F. Seitz’s New York exteriors capture in drab grays and blacks a city stripped of glamour and allure. Holding it all together is Milland’s admirable performance, conveying the character’s softness, his voluptuous surrender to indulgence, to perfection.

• Written by Wilder, Charles Brackett, from the novel by Charles R. Jackson. Photographed by John F. Seitz. With Ray Milland, Jane Wyman, Philip Terry, Howard da Silva. (101 mins, B&W, 35mm, From NBC Universal Distribution)

Cornel West: The Radical King

Saturday, January 31st, 2015 - Saturday, January 31st, 2015, 1/31/15, 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM

First Congregational Church of Oakland
2501 Harrison St

In Oakland

KPFA Radio 94.1FM presents:

Two of our greatest activist minds meet!
CORNEL WEST portrays the true REV. MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR.
"The Radical King"

Hosted by Davey D
............................................................................................
Saturday, January 31, 2015, 7:30 pm
First Congregational Church, 2501 Harrison Street, Oakland
$12 advance tickets: http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/1036518 :: 800-838-3006 or Marcus Books, Pegasus (3 sites) Moe's, Walden Pond, Diesel a Bookstore, Mrs. Dalloway's Books SF: Modern Times, $15 door, KPFA benefit www.kpfa.org/events
............................................................................................

As racial tension again flares across the country, Dr. Cornel West provides a clear portrait of King as a radical visionary. While King is currently recognized as a major leader in America's civil rights movement, a transcendent orator and an insistent proponent of nonviolence, few realize how truly radical he was. Dr. Cornel West brilliantly establishes King's revolutionary Christian vision, seeing him as a passionate democratic socialist, underscoring his profound identification with the poor, his unapologetic opposition to the Vietnam War, to all war, and his crusade against global imperialism.

Dr. Cornel West, unarguably one of America's most gifted and provocative public intellectuals, has been profoundly influenced by Dr. King. Currently he is a professor of philosophy and Christian practice at Union Theological Seminary in New York City. He is the author of many books as well as a frequent guest on contemporary forums.

Davey D is the Host of Hard Knock Radio (airing on KPFA 94.1FM weekdays at 4pm). He is also Adjunct Professor in the Afrostudies Dept. at S.F.State University.

Presented by KPFA Radio 94.1 FM.

$12 advance, $15 door.

Some Interviews on Personal Matters (Lana Gogoberidze; USSR, 1977)

Saturday, January 31st, 2015 - Saturday, January 31st, 2015, 5:00pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Imported Print!
In Person/Lana Gogoberidze

Sofiko, a young newspaper employee, is passionately involved in her work interviewing people who have submitted complaint letters to the editor. One of the women Sofiko interviews is her mother, and the pair’s onscreen relationship strongly resembles the tragic early life of the director and her mother, making this a very personal film for Lana Gogoberidze. A bold mixture of documentary and social-psychological drama—and the first film to make mention of Stalin’s camps—Some Interviews on Personal Matters makes powerful statements about women, work, family, and marriage that earned it international acclaim as the first feminist film of the Soviet cinema. —MoMA

• Written by Erlom Akhvlediani, Zaira Akhvlediani, Gogoberidze. Photographed by Nugzar Erkomaishvili. With Sofiko Chiaureli, Gia Badridze, Ketevan Orakhelashvili. (95 mins, In Georgian with German subtitles and English electronic titling, Color, 35mm, From Arsenal—Institute for Film and Video Art).

Happy Accidents: New Work by John Casey

Saturday, January 31st, 2015 - Sunday, March 8th, 2015, 6-9pm

The Compound Gallery
1167 65th St.

In Oakland

The Compound Gallery presents “Happy Accidents”, a solo show featuring Casey’s recent foray into color. For years Casey has worked primarily with black, white, and grey (and occasionally reddish-orange-brown) in ink or pencil. Recently Casey experienced a color epiphany, with a new cast of characters in the form of paintings, drawings, and sculpture. Come out and see his expanding, technicolor, recessive-gene-pool family.

Histoire(s) du cinéma (Chapters 1 and 2) (Jean-Luc Godard; France, 1988–98)

Saturday, January 31st, 2015 - Saturday, January 31st, 2015, 7:45pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Continues on Sunday / 2.1.15

Godard mourns the death of cinema and chronicles its vitality in the dazzling video series Histoire(s) du cinéma. Histoire(s) du cinema emphasizes the influence film exercises on viewers—the impact of an image, the different realities that it provides, and the various frames of mind it engenders. Godard's purpose in these elliptical, epigrammatic montage essays is, he says, "to show that the history of film is, first of all, not history but consisting of histories. And then show that all histories are intertwined with the history of the twentieth century....Not showing a chronological order, names or dates, but a gust of wind, starting from the basic idea that the entire twentieth century was the stage for a merciless fight between image and sound (the newborn) and word (the grown–up, the government)."

Chapter 1(a), Toutes les histoires (All the (Hi)stories) (51 mins).
Chapter 1(b), Une histoire seule (One Single (Hi)story) (42 mins).
Chapter 2(a), Seul le cinéma (Only Cinema) (27 mins).
Chapter 2(b), Fatale beauté (Deadly Beauty) (28 mins).

• Written by Godard. (148 mins, plus intermission, In French with English subtitles, B&W/Color, Beta SP, From Gaumont, permission Olive Films)

Iconic Radio Host David Gans Announces the 29th Annual KPFA Grateful Dead Marathon!

Saturday, January 31st, 2015 - Sunday, February 1st, 2015, 9:00 a.m.

KPFA
1929 Martin Luther King Jr Way

In Berkeley

Deadheads of the World Gather Round! Iconic Radio Host David Gans (The Grateful Dead Hour and Dead to the World), Celebrates 30 Years in Radio and 29 Years of Fundraising in his 29th Annual KPFA Grateful Dead Marathon!

"The Dead have kept KPFA alive for many years."--Quincy McCoy, GM of 94.1 FM, KPFA

"I came up in the time when we thought music could change the world, and I still think it
can—the only way the world can be changed: one person, one soul at a time."--David Gans

Hosted by David Gans and Dead to the World co-host Tim Lynch, the marathon promises to continue its long-held tradition of featuring selections of unreleased music from the Grateful Dead archive, live in-studio musical surprises and an auction of Grateful Dead memorabilia that will be announced shortly in an upcoming press release!

Berkeley's pioneering listener-supported radio station, KPFA, presents its annual Grateful Dead fund-raising marathon on Saturday, January 31, 2015 from 9:00 am to 1:00 am. Host David Gans and co-host Tim Lynch promise a bounty of unreleased music from the Grateful Dead archive, highlights of live performances that have happened on Dead to the World over the past years, and live in-studio musical surprises (musicians TBA) from the KPFA Performance Studio. Just imagine sixteen hours of non-stop musical fun!!

In the weeks leading up to the 2015 marathon, as in 2014, Gans will auction desirable Grateful Dead memorabilia via the Facebook page of his weekly program Dead to the World ( https://www.facebook.com/dttw.kpfa ). The auction items will be announced shortly in an upcoming press release. The marathon will be simulcast on nugs.net and gdradio.net To donate to KPFA (which you can do any time), visit https://secure.kpfa.org/support/

MEDIA CONTACT: Tanya Pinkerton 510-669-9832 or David Gans 510-469-3424 and david@gdhour.com 


Bees: Tiny Insect, Big Impact

Saturday, January 31st, 2015 - Sunday, September 20th, 2015, January 31-September 20, 2015; Wed-Thur 11-5, Fri 11-9, Sat-Sun 10-6

Oakland Museum of California
1000 Oak Street

In Oakland

A new exhibition at the Oakland Museum of California examines the wildly diverse and intricate world of one of the most important creatures to human agriculture and the natural environment. Through family-friendly experiences, hands-on activities, and media, Bees: Tiny Insect, Big Impact is the first major museum exhibition to focus on the incredible diversity of bees in California and the urgent issue of bee population declines statewide. Bees tells the story of these amazing insects, while providing visitors the opportunity to learn about the value of bees to our economy and ecosystems, and discover how simple but powerful actions can help bees to survive in a changing world. Covering topics such Bay Area beekeeping, the diversity of California native bee species, and the similarities between bees and humans, the exhibition features cutting-edge science on bee behavior and conservation, opportunities for visitors to get involved in research, and ways to make their own yards and neighborhoods more attractive to bees.

A family friendly exhibition, Bees encourages visitors of all ages to discover real bee specimens under a microscope, play games such as "Is it a bee?" to learn how species are identified, and create original animations about their vision for a future with bees. Visitors can climb inside life sized honeybee cells, learning along the way about factors that contribute to bee disappearances. The gallery features real beekeeping tools, including a cross-section of a beehive, a honey spinner and implements for honey collection, and a chance to try on real beekeeper suits in adult and child sizes. The exhibition also offers opportunities to get involved outside of the Gallery, with citizen science projects, bee hotels installed in the OMCA Gardens, and guides on building bee hotels for visitors to take home.

Presented by Oakland Museum of California.

$10-15; $6 9-17, 8 & under free, OMCA Mbrs free

The Day Is Longer Than the Night (Lana Gogoberidze; USSR, 1984)

Sunday, February 1st, 2015 - Sunday, February 1st, 2015, 2:00pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Imported Print!
In Person/Lana Gogoberidze

Distinguished by its location shooting, eye for traditional customs, and appealing performances, this ballad follows the life of Eva from the turn of the century through various milestones, both personal and historic. Each dramatic episode is linked to the next by a troupe of actors and musicians, who offer their own commentary. Gogoberidze’s film premiered in competition in Cannes in 1984, a high point in a career that included a string of remarkable films between 1958 and 1992, mostly in collaboration with screenwriter Zaira Arsenishvili (When Almonds Blossomed, The Little Incident, Some Interviews on Personal Matters, Whirlwind, The Waltz on the Pechora).

• Written by Zaira Arsenishvili, Gogoberidze. Photographed by Nugzar Erkomaishvili. With Deredjan Kharchiadze, Tamara Skhirtladze, Guram Pirtskhalava, Irakli Khizanichvili. (105 mins, In Georgian with English subtitles, Color, 35mm, From BFI)

Histoire(s) du cinéma (Chapters 3 and 4) (Jean-Luc Godard; France, 1988–98)

Sunday, February 1st, 2015 - Sunday, February 1st, 2015, 5:00pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Continues from Saturday 1.31.15

Godard mourns the death of cinema and chronicles its vitality in the dazzling video series Histoire(s) du cinéma. Histoire(s) du cinema emphasizes the influence film exercises on viewers—the impact of an image, the different realities that it provides, and the various frames of mind it engenders. Godard's purpose in these elliptical, epigrammatic montage essays is, he says, "to show that the history of film is, first of all, not history but consisting of histories. And then show that all histories are intertwined with the history of the twentieth century....Not showing a chronological order, names or dates, but a gust of wind, starting from the basic idea that the entire twentieth century was the stage for a merciless fight between image and sound (the newborn) and word (the grown–up, the government)."

Chapter 3(a), La Monnaie de l'absolu (The Coin of the Absolute) (26 mins).
Chapter 3(b), Une Vague Nouvelle (A New Wave) (27 mins).
Chapter 4(a), Le Côntrole de l'univers (The Control of the Universe) (27 mins).
Chapter 4(b), Les Signes parmi nous (The Signs Among Us) (37 mins).

• Written by Godard. (117 mins, In French with English subtitles, B&W/Color, Beta SP, From Gaumont permission Olive Films)

Titicut Follies (Frederick Wiseman; US, 1967)

Tuesday, February 3rd, 2015 - Tuesday, February 3rd, 2015, 7:00pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

In the late fifties, Frederick Wiseman, then a professor of law, took his students to observe the Bridgewater State Hospital for the Criminally Insane in Massachusetts. What they saw was a modern-day snake pit with dehumanized inmates offered little hope or dignity. Six years later Wiseman returned, this time with a 16mm camera. The result of his visit, Titicut Follies is a stark but compassionate look at the horrific conditions that persisted in the state-run institution. Among the inventory of indignities are decrepit men led naked to their cells while guards taunt them into fits of anger, and a young man whose complaint that incarceration is making his condition worse is met by flippant replies from staff psychiatrists. Representing the inmates, the state took Wiseman to court, charging that he had violated their wards’ privacy. Not until twenty-four years later was the injunction overturned and the film allowed to be shown. Wiseman has maintained all along that “the privacy that was really invaded was the privacy of the state officials to run the place in the way it was run.”

• Photographed by John Marshall. (87 mins, B&W, 16mm, From Zipporah Films)

The Anabasis of May and Fusako Shigenobu, Masao Adachi and 27 Years Without Images (Eric Baudelaire; France/Japan/Lebanon, 2011)

Wednesday, February 4th, 2015 - Wednesday, February 4th, 2015, 7:00pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Few artists have turned from creating revolutionary art into a commitment to true revolution like Masao Adachi, a collaborator with both the Japanese New Wave and the Japanese Red Army. A scriptwriter and colleague of Nagisa Oshima and Koji Wakamatsu, and a director of left-wing sex films, Adachi abandoned commercial filmmaking—and Japan—entirely in 1974 to join the extremist Japanese Red Army in exile in Beirut, where the group gained notoriety through deadly hijackings and bombings in support of a free Palestine and a worldwide communist revolution. Also in Beirut was the group’s founder, Fusako Shigenobu, and her daughter, May, who lived incognito for years. A film on exile, revolution, landscapes, and memory, Anabasis brings forth the remarkable parallel stories of Adachi and May, one a filmmaker who gave up images, another a young woman whose undercover existence forbade keeping images of her own life. Baudelaire places Adachi and May’s revelatory voice-over reminiscences over warm, fragile Super 8mm footage of Tokyo and Beirut, grounding their wide-ranging reflections in the solid reality of place. Anabasis provides a richly rewarding remembrance of a fascinating, now nearly forgotten era and reminds us of the power of cinema to both portray—and influence—its landscape.

Written and photographed by Baudelaire. Narrated by Masao Adachi and May Shigenobu (66 mins, In English and Japanese with English subtitles, Color/B&W, DCP, From LUX)

Preceded by:
The Makes
Eric Baudelaire (France, 2009)
An adaptation of Michelangelo( Antonioni’s notes on unmade films published in That Bowling Alley on the Tiber, starring French film critic Philippe Azoury in the role of “The Critic.” (26 mins, In French with English subtitles, Color, DCP, From LUX)

Total running time: 92 mins

The Ugly One (Eric Baudelaire; France/Lebanon/Japan, 2013)

Thursday, February 5th, 2015 - Thursday, February 5th, 2015, 7:00pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

With the war-torn Beirut cityscape as its backdrop—urban alleys, glistening beaches, abandoned buildings—Eric Baudelaire’s complex film unfolds in a time and place that vacillates among revolutionary narratives of the past, the fragile and ever-changing political situation of the present, and attempts to piece together the memories of those that live, or once lived, in the city. Conceived as a sequel to his documentary The Anabasis of May and Fusako Shigenobu, Masao Adachi and 27 Years Without Images (2011), Baudelaire builds the structure of the film around a story told by Adachi, who also narrates the film. The plot line pivots around two lovers and former resistance fighters, Michel (played by Lebanese artist and actor Rabih Mroué) and Lili (Juliette Navis); their narratives fragment and reconfigure around the screenplay, which itself intertwines with Adachi’s own history, the act of making the film, and the self-conscious and sometimes improvisatory process of writing the script. 

• Written by Baudelaire, Masao Adachi, and Laure Vermeersch. Photographed by Claire Mathon. With Rabih Mroué, Juliette Navis, and Manal Khader. Narrated by Masao Adachi. (101 mins, In French, Arabic, Japanese, English with French and English subtitles, Color, DCP, From LUX)

Ebb+Flow 2015 Mills Dance Alumni Concert

Friday, February 6th, 2015 - Friday, February 6th, 2015, 2/6/15, 7:45 PM - 10:00 PM

Lisser Theater
Mills College, 5000 MacArthur Blvd.

In Oakland

The Mills College Dance Alumni Group�kicks off its fourth annual Mills Dance Alumni Concert presenting�Ebb+Flow�2015,�February 6th. The entirely volunteer-run event celebrates Mills' community, both past and present by curating a concert each year through an application process. The review committee aims to showcase the diversity in background and artistic vision of Mills dance alumni through the generations and this year is no exception.��Ebb+Flow 2015�will present the work of seven choreographers and include dance film, solo and group pieces, and collaborations with local composers.

Choreography by�Bianca Brzezinski (2010), Claudine Naganuma (1992), Jeanette Male (2013), Julie Binkley (2007),�Mary Carbonara (1998), Prudence Amsden (2012), Rebecca Anne Wilson (2007),�with welcoming reception performance by Amy Dewey (2002)�

In addition to the concert, all Mills Dance Alumni are celebrated at a post-show reception on campus hosted by the Mills College Dance Alumni Group, the Mills College Dance Department, and the Mills College Office of Alumnae Relations.�

Presented by Mills Dance Alumni Group.

$10 cash at the door; free to Mills community.


For Ever Mozart (Jean-Luc Godard; Switzerland/France, 1996)

Friday, February 6th, 2015 - Friday, February 6th, 2015, 7:00pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

New Digital Restoration!

A group of young people set out from Switzerland for Sarajevo to mount a performance of a play by Alfred Musset and are gruesomely ambushed; meanwhile, a movie director is preparing an epic on war but can't get past the endless retakes. Godard's film is a Pirandellian provocation-"36 Characters in Search of History." It is also "the most . . . profound of the films Godard has made about war, beginning with Les Carabiniers . . . Proceeding perhaps from the homily that on the battlefield, the explosion you hear is never the one that kills you, For Ever Mozart is a film in which image and sound are disjoined from the start . . . In confronting the failure of art to change the course of history and the moral obligation of the artist to nevertheless bear witness to her/his time, For Ever Mozart treads on ground so familiar it can only be played as farce . . . In the age of unreason . . . beautiful image(s) . . . collide, fragment, and fly apart" (Amy Taubin, Village Voice).

• Written by Godard. Photographed by Christophe Pollock et al. With Madeleine Assas, Ghalia Lacroix, Bérangère Allaux, Vicky Messica. (85 mins, In French with English subtitles, Color, DCP, From Cohen Film Collections)

One, Two, Three (Billy Wilder; US, 1961)

Friday, February 6th, 2015 - Friday, February 6th, 2015, 8:45pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Academy Award for Best Cinematography!

One, Two, Three's travesty of Cold War politics, filmed in Berlin at the moment when the Wall went up, boils the war down to its essentials: "To hell with Krushchev!" "To hell with Frank Sinatra!" In a furiously paced slapstick entirely lacking The Apartment's humanity, no one is spared Wilder's acid pen: not the West Germans who, while "enjoying all the blessings of democracy" (i.e., Coca Cola), seek every opportunity to click their heels; nor the East Berliners, who don't return deposit bottles; nor the Russians, whose trio of emissaries are rather more decadent than their counterparts in Ninotchka; nor, finally, Coca Cola functionary/Yankee Doodle Dandy Jimmy Cagney, who speaks loudly and is all schtick. Pamela Tiffin's Patty Hearst–like runaway capitalist meets Horst Buchholz's runaway communist in Berlin—a bombed–out desert ripe for ideological battle, a place that, for Austrian–emigré Wilder, like Russia "is to get out of, not into."

• Written by Wilder, I.A.L. Diamond, based on the play Egy, ketto, három by Ferenc Molnár. Photographed by Daniel Fapp. With James Cagney, Horst Buchholz, Pamela Tiffen, Arlene Francis. (108 mins, B&W, 'Scope, 35mm, From Park Circus)

A Continuous Harmony: New Tonalist Paintings By Robert Flanary and Paul Roehl

Saturday, February 7th, 2015 - Saturday, February 28th, 2015

Holton Studio Gallery
5510 Doyle St.

In Emeryville

The Holton Studio Gallery presents new tonalist landscape paintings by artists Robert Flanary and Paul Roehl. On view in the gallery from February 7-28, 2015. Please join us for the artist reception on Feb. 7th, from 5-7 pm at Holton Studio, 5510 Doyle St., Emeryville, Ca. 94608
More information at www.HoltonFrames.com

Artist Talk: The Art of Living Black

Saturday, February 7th, 2015 - Saturday, February 7th, 2015, 12 - 1:30 pm

Richmond Art Center
2540 Barrett Ave

In Richmond

Listen to a panel of regional artists of African descent as they discuss their influences and wide-ranging artwork in the 19th annual The Art of Living Black exhibition. This exhibition features over 50 local artists and runs through February 27, 2015

Richmond Art Center Opening Reception

Saturday, February 7th, 2015 - Saturday, February 7th, 2015, 2 - 5 pm

Richmond Art Center
2540 Barrett Ave

In Richmond

Enjoy the work of emerging and established Bay Area artists at this reception for new exhibitions. See artwork by 50 local artists of African American descent in the 19th Annual The Art of Living Black; works by the Art Center’s talented professional artist-instructors; and the mixed-media work of Yisrael Feldsott which explores of the formal potentials of disparate materials to portray the gamut of the human experience.

See & Make Art

Saturday, February 7th, 2015 - Saturday, February 7th, 2015, 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM

Richmond Art Center
2540 Barrett Ave

In Richmond

Join us for our free, first Saturday bilingual art tours! Come and enjoy a guided tour of the Richmond Art Center's four galleries and a hands-on art making activity! Open to all ages. Families welcome.

Please meet the group in the Madeline F. Whittlesey Community Room at the Richmond Public Library, Main Branch (325 Civic Center Plaza) and we’ll walk as a group over to the Art Center.

Five Graves to Cairo (Billy Wilder; US, 1943)

Saturday, February 7th, 2015 - Saturday, February 7th, 2015, 6:30pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Archival Print!

Five Graves to Cairo was probably the first American film to deal maturely with World War II, bringing a welcome relief from the masochistic and jingoistic last-stand dramas that cluttered screens in 1942. The film created quite a stir at the time for its remarkable currency; it was begun after the fall of Tobruk and completed three months before Rommel lost the African Campaign. Five Graves is also Wilder’s vest-pocket Citizen Kane—the film in which he explores all the possibilities of the medium. Among the most striking touches are the opening appearance of a “dead” tank and a fantastic fight involving a flashlight. Franchot Tone is quite good as the improvising hero, a British corporal left behind during the retreat at Sidi Halfaya, Libya, but the high point is Stroheim’s definitive incarnation of Rommel. As NY Times critic Bosley Crowther wrote, “Whenever he appears in this picture, a swaggering bully waving a tasseled fly-swatter, he gives you the creeps . . . Boy, what a nasty Hun!”

• Written by Wilder, Charles Brackett, based on the play Színmü négy felvonásban by Lajos Biro. Photographed by John F. Seitz. With Franchot Tone, Anne Baxter, Akim Tamiroff, Erich Von Stroheim. (96 mins, B&W, archival 35mm, From UCLA Film and Television Archives)

My Grandmother (Kote Mikaberidze; USSR, 1929)

Saturday, February 7th, 2015 - Saturday, February 7th, 2015, 8:30pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Gogol meets Charlie Chaplin in this riotous, scathingly anti-bureaucratic satire. My Grandmother is a genuine piece of grotesquerie descended from the Soviet Eccentric Cinema (FEKS) of the twenties. For invention, it matches any film of the French avant-garde, taking in all kinds of advanced filmic devices such as stop-motion, bits of puppetry, and animation, as well as expressionist decor and camera angles. The energetic music track will have you dancing a Soviet-style Charleston along with the film's most memorable character, a wide-eyed, wild-haired bureaucrat's wife who is caught up in a frenzy of bourgeois living. Her equally comic husband personifies the indolence, irrelevance, and obduracy of a state system that resembles nothing so much as a giant scoreboard, winding down. When he loses his job, he learns the true value of a "grandmother"—a slang term for the patronage and privilege that keep the machine greased. What are we to think when, at the film's end, he is reprimanded by a Lenin-like worker, shot from the ground so that he looks ten feet tall? Suppressed for half a century, this irreverent blast has lost none of its immediacy.

• Written by Mikaberidze, Giorgi Mdivani, Siko Dolidze. Photographed by Anton Polikevich, Vladimir Poznan. With Aleksandre Takaishvili, Bella Chernova, E. Obanov. (65 mins, Silent with music track, Russian intertitles with English electronic titling, B&W, 35mm, BAM/PFA Collection)

Improvisation as Form & Using the Effort Actions

Saturday, February 7th, 2015 - Saturday, February 7th, 2015, 9:30am-12:30pm

Luna Dance Institute
605 Addison St

In Berkeley

Improvisation as Form & Using the Effort Actions
Saturday, 2/7, 9:30-12:30pm
This two-part workshop explores practical applications of Laban’s Effort Actions & Improvisation skills to enliven dance teaching in schools and studios. Register online at lunadanceinstitute.org or contact jperena@lunadanceinstitute.org, 510-883-1118.

Improvisation as Form & Using the Effort Actions

Saturday, February 7th, 2015 - Saturday, February 7th, 2015, 9:30am-12:30pm

Luna Dance Institute
605 Addison St.

In Berkeley

Improvisation as Form & Using the Effort Actions
Saturday, 2/7, 9:30-12:30pm
This two-part workshop explores practical applications of Laban’s Effort Actions & Improvisation skills to enliven dance teaching in schools and studios. Register online at lunadanceinstitute.org or contact jperena@lunadanceinstitute.org, 510-883-1118.

France/tour/détour/deux/enfants (Parts 1–6) (Jean-Luc Godard, Anne-Marie Miéville; France, 1978)

Sunday, February 8th, 2015 - Sunday, February 8th, 2015, 3:00pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Continues on Tuesday / 2.10.15

A series of twelve television programs, this now legendary work summons up a funny, frightening image of contemporary France through interviews with two children (the "deux enfants" of the title), Camille and Arnaud, who are asked existential questions—and others, such as why the cleaning woman gets paid but mother does not. The questioner is Robert Linard, actually Godard with a markedly Swiss accent. Parables and politics, metaphysics and metaphors, science fiction and anthropology, the opinions of specialists and the words of innocents all combine in frank, funny attempts to assume the viewpoint of children, to see how the everyday world operates on given truths. If Roland Barthes replaced Art Linkletter on Kids Say the Darnedest Things, you might get something like this great work.

• Written by Godard, Miéville. Photographed by Pierre Binggeli, Dominique Chapuis, William Lubtchansky, Philippe Rony. With Betty Berr, Albert Dray, Arnaud Martin, Camille Virolleaud. (180 mins (six 30-minute episodes) plus intermission, In French with English subtitles, Color, Digital files, From Electronic Arts Intermix, permission INA)

Berkeley Symphony and Friends Chamber Music Series

Sunday, February 8th, 2015 - Sunday, February 8th, 2015, 5-7pm

Piedmont Center for the Arts
801 Magnolia Avenue, Piedmont, CA 94611

In

The Piedmont Center for the Arts will host a series of four chamber music concerts featuring Berkeley Symphony musicians and their guests. Artists: René Mandel, violin; Peter Wyrick, cello; Markus Pawlik, piano. Presenting works by Mozart and Tchaikovsky.

Kiss Me, Stupid (Billy Wilder; US, 1964)

Sunday, February 8th, 2015 - Sunday, February 8th, 2015, 6:30pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Deliriously vulgar sex comedy played as embittered film noir, Kiss Me, Stupid is one of Wilder's most vicious, devastating films. Dean Martin plays a version of himself that we can only hope is exaggerated, a lascivious lounge singer who drifts out of Vegas on a sea of booze and lands in desolate Climax, Nevada. He's taken in by piano teacher and frustrated pop songwriter Ray Walston, who, torn between his desire to butter up the insatiable Dino and his own pathological jealousy, hires "cocktail waitress" (euphemism) Kim Novak as a stand-in for his own dangerously attractive wife. Novak is uncomfortably convincing as the good–natured gal trapped in the body of a Playboy cartoon; Walston's maniacally hypocritical husband is downright horrifying. Referring to the script's outrageously sexual humor, Walston reportedly asked Wilder, "How do you think you're gonna get away with some of this stuff?" The restored uncensored ending of tonight's print gets away with more than anyone could wish for.

• Written by Wilder, I.A.L., based on the play L'ora della fantasia by Anna Bonacci. Photographed by Joseph La Shelle. With Dean Martin, Kim Novak, Ray Walston, Felicia Farr. (124 mins, B&W, 'Scope, 35mm, From Park Circus)

France/tour/détour/deux/enfants (Parts 7–12) (Jean-Luc Godard, Anne-Marie Miéville; France, 1978)

Tuesday, February 10th, 2015 - Tuesday, February 10th, 2015, 7:00pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Continues from Sunday / 2.8.15

A series of twelve television programs, this now legendary work summons up a funny, frightening image of contemporary France through interviews with two children (the "deux enfants" of the title), Camille and Arnaud, who are asked existential questions—and others, such as why the cleaning woman gets paid but mother does not. The questioner is Robert Linard, actually Godard with a markedly Swiss accent. Parables and politics, metaphysics and metaphors, science fiction and anthropology, the opinions of specialists and the words of innocents all combine in frank, funny attempts to assume the viewpoint of children, to see how the everyday world operates on given truths. If Roland Barthes replaced Art Linkletter on Kids Say the Darnedest Things, you might get something like this great work.

• Written by Godard, Miéville. Photographed by Pierre Binggeli, Dominique Chapuis, William Lubtchansky, Philippe Rony. With Betty Berr, Albert Dray, Arnaud Martin, Camille Virolleaud. (180 mins (six 30-minute episodes) plus intermission, In French with English subtitles, Color, Digital files, From Electronic Arts Intermix, permission INA)

Sambizanga (Sarah Maldoror; Angola/Congo, 1972)

Wednesday, February 11th, 2015 - Wednesday, February 11th, 2015, 7:00pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

In the first of a two-program tribute to Sarah Maldoror, we present Sambizanga, one of the first feature films made by a woman in Africa. Cowritten by her husband, a leader in the Angolan resistance, and "based on a novel by Luandino Vieira, a political prisoner of the Portuguese from 1961 to 1974, Sambizanga is a fictionalized chronicle of the arrest and fatal imprisonment of a man whose underground activities were an impenetrable secret to all around him. It was at a prison near the Luandan suburb of Sambizanga on February 4, 1961, that the first uprising of what was to become the Angolan resistance movement was staged. The film is set a few weeks before that uprising, during a time of increasingly desperate and repressive security measures by the colonial government. Rather than depicting the rebellion itself, Maldoror concentrates on the events leading up to it . . . It is worth noting, too, that Maldoror assisted Gilles Pontecorvo in the filming of The Battle of Algiers, a masterpiece of semidocumentary filmmaking and a seminal document in the history of that struggle".

• Written by Maldoror, Mario de Andrade, Maurice Pons, based on the novel by Luandino Vieira. Photographed by Claude Agostini. With Domingos de Oliveira, Elisa Andrade, Dino Abelino, Talagongo. (102 mins, In Portuguese with English subtitles, Color, 16mm, From the Reserve Film and Video Collection of The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts)

Sarah Maldoror: Films of Resistance

Thursday, February 12th, 2015 - Thursday, February 12th, 2015, 7:00pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

A French filmmaker of Guadeloupian descent, Sarah Maldoror attended film school in Moscow with Ousmane Sembène, and then went on to work on The Battle of Algiers. Her first short film, shot in Algeria, was set during the Angolan resistance. Carnival in Guinea-Bissau features the vibrant carnival as well as interviews with Luís Cabral, who became that country’s first president. Maldoror's first feature, Guns for Banta was commissioned by the Algerian government to chronicle the Guinean and Cape Verdean fights for independence, but was never completed. In his fascinating essay film, Mathieu Kleyebe Abonnenc excavates the history of this lost film, drawing on photographs, documents, and conversations with Maldoror and her former partner, Mario de Andrade.

Monangambée (Sarah Maldoror, Algeria, 1968, 15 mins, B&W, 16mm, From Arsenal Distribution)

Carnival in Guinea-Bissau (Sarah Maldoror, Guinea, 1971, 17 mins, Color, Digital Video, From Flaherty Film Seminar)

Foreword to Guns for Banta (Mathieu Kleyebe Abonnenc, France, 2011, 25 mins, Color, Digital, From the artist

Total running time: 57 mins

Notre musique (Jean-Luc Godard; Switzerland/France, 2004)

Friday, February 13th, 2015 - Friday, February 13th, 2015, 7:00pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Godard’s profound film/essay/provocation on art, war, and society divides itself into three acts à la Dante to investigate how to live in—and respond to—a time of constant conflict. “Hell” suitably launches with a relentless (cinematic) assault, not of the flesh but of cinema: clips from films, news reports, and more, all of warfare. Filmed in Sarajevo after the Balkan Wars, “Purgatory” finds Godard (as himself) lecturing on image and text, while his Jewish translator spars with noted Palestinian author Mahmoud Darwish afterwards. “Paradise,” meanwhile, takes a more elegiac, pastoral viewpoint of the aftermath of the Palestine/Israeli conflict. Image and text, art and war, protest and acceptance; Notre Musique examines the dualities of civilization and humanity. “Humane people never start wars,” Godard notes, “They open libraries.”

• Written by Godard. Photographed by Julien Hirsch. With Sarah Adler, Nade Dieu, Rony Kramer, Simon Eine. (80 mins, In French with English subtitles, Color, 35mm, From New Yorker Films)

The White Caravan (Eldar Shengelaia, Tamaz Meliava; USSR, 1963)

Friday, February 13th, 2015 - Friday, February 13th, 2015, 8:40pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Imported Print!
Back by Popular Demand!

A work that certainly deserves to be better known, The White Caravan has a commonality with the moral codes found in the Western genre. Against a rugged landscape and the forces of nature, a group of shepherds, led by the experienced Martia and his sons, move their flock to winter pastures. The rural way of life is contrasted with the lure of the big city, and one character’s decision to break with tradition ultimately comes to haunt him. The film makes striking use of cinematography, especially during a dramatic windstorm sequence, which also showcases expressive editing techniques.

• Written by Merab Eliozishvili. Photographed by Leonid Kalashnikov. With Imedo Kakhiani, Ariadna Shengelaia, Giorgi Kikadze. (97 mins, In Georgian with French subtitles and English electronic titling, B&W, 35mm, From La Cinémathèque de Toulouse)

Artist Talk: The Art of Living Black

Saturday, February 14th, 2015 - Saturday, February 14th, 2015, 12 - 1:30 pm

Richmond Art Center
2540 Barrett Ave

In Richmond

Listen to a panel of regional artists of African descent as they discuss their influences and wide-ranging artwork in the 19th annual The Art of Living Black exhibition. This exhibition features over 50 local artists and runs through February 27, 2015

Enigma - A Freak Show

Saturday, February 14th, 2015 - Saturday, February 14th, 2015, 2/14/15, 4:00 PM - 12:00 AM

Lottie Rose Artist House
6117 San Pablo Ave

In Oakland

Get twisted this Valentine's day with an abstract perspective on love. Come and enjoy interactive live performances and art. All ages are welcomed. No patron will walk away empty handed. There will be two stories of art and a lounge. The lounge will include darts, food and beverages. There will be live music, physically interactive sonic manipulation, a bearded psychic woman "Wanda Lovesick", vendors, body art and much more. This is the Freak Show, where anything can happen.

Presented by Firehouse Artist Collective.

Free

Ninotchka (Ernst Lubitsch; US, 1939)

Saturday, February 14th, 2015 - Saturday, February 14th, 2015, 6:30pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

"Garbo laughs!' said the ads for Ninotchka . . . an event on a par with “Garbo talks!,” the 1930 slogan that heralded her talkie debut in Anna Christie. Garbo—the paradigm for all stars in her beauty and mystery and final inaccessibility—was now a screwball heroine, too. And the mystery compounded: she was funny . . . One of the elements of the Garbo mystique was always the degree to which she could make idealism seem as much a felt human need as love or food. So that in Ninotchka she can speak of getting “foreign currency to buy tractors” (Lubitsch gives her a full glowing close-up) and be powerfully moving as she does so. Garbo, Lubitsch, and the screwball comedy come together in this film in a most astonishing result: the closest thing to a convincing socialist heroine the English-speaking cinema has yet produced. It's a nice payoff to the screwball tradition: that it had the freedom to offer even this surprise. 

• Written by Billy Wilder, Walter Reisch, Charles Brackett, from an original story by Melchior Lengyel. Photographed by William Daniels. With Greta Garbo, Melvyn Douglas, Ina Claire, Bela Lugosi. (110 mins, B&W, DCP, From Warner Bros.)

Marin Baroque Presents: Calextone, The Art of Courtly Love

Saturday, February 14th, 2015 - Saturday, February 14th, 2015, 8 PM

First Presbyterian Church San Anselmo
72 Kensington Rd, San Anselmo

In

Marin Baroque Presents:
After last year’s gorgeous Valentine’s Day concert, Calextone agreed to honor us with an encore concert! They will present “The Art of Courtly Love,” music of love from 15th century France. Calextone is comprised of Allison Zelles Lloyd, voice and harp; Shira Kammen, vielle and harp; Frances Blaker, hammered dulcimer and recorders; and Letitia Berlin, recorders and doucaine. Come join us for this very special Valentine’s Day music!
The concert will be held at First Presbyterian Church, 72 Kensington Rd, SAN ANSELMO, 94960, Saturday, February 14, at 8 PM.
Tickets: $20/general admission, $15/seniors & students, $5/children (10 & under). Tickets available: http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/1104611 or call 415-497-6634.
Reception immediately follows the concert. www.marinbaroque.org
marinbaroque@gmail.com

Some Like It Hot (Billy Wilder; US, 1959)

Saturday, February 14th, 2015 - Saturday, February 14th, 2015, 8:40pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

If cleavage comedy aroused the fifties, Some Like It Hot brings on the falsies. Director Billy Wilder cross-dresses his comedy, freely mixing slapstick antics with screwball frantic, and a crime caper dragging down a musical farce. On the lam from the Chicago mob, jazz musicians Tony Curtis and Jack Lemmon get gigs in an all-gal group, featuring the singer Sugar Kane (Marilyn Monroe), and head, incognito, for Florida. Tony and Jack, now Josephine and Daphne, find themselves surrounded by jazzy women, but dressed in kind. The gender gags are pitch-perfect as the band heads south, playing along with this most modern of arrangements. Ranked #1 by the American Film Institute’s 100 Years . . . 100 Laughs and rated “C” (Condemned) by the Catholic Legion of Decency.

• Written by Wilder, I. A. L. Diamond, suggested by a story by Robert Thoeren, Michael Logan. Photographed by Charles Lang, Jr. With Marilyn Monroe, Tony Curtis, Jack Lemmon, George Raft. (120 mins, B&W, DCP, From Park Circus)

Marion Gray: Within the Light

Saturday, February 14th, 2015 - Sunday, June 21st, 2015, February 14-June 21, 2015; Museum hours: Wed-Thur 11-5, Fri 11-9, Sat-Sun 10-6

Oakland Museum of California
1000 Oak Street

In Oakland

The Oakland Museum of California presents an exhibition of work spanning four decades by groundbreaking and chimerical California artist/photographer Marion Gray in Marion Gray: Within the Light, on view February 14 through June 21, 2015 in the Gallery of California Art. Curated by Christina Linden, Associate Curator of Painting & Sculpture, the exhibition highlights the career of this artist, innovator, and performance art-world insider who has blurred and expanded the boundaries between fine art photography, performance, and documentation.

Marion Gray: Within the Light features 23 photos by the artist, who has spent four decades capturing performances, dance, and installations by some of the most significant artists in the Bay Area and beyond. The creative networks portrayed in the exhibition have fueled Gray's life work as a photographer and, in turn, Gray's images have contributed to the vitality of the scene. Including never-before-seen photographs, the exhibition covers the 1970s to the present and highlights the work of artists including Barbara Hammer, The Harrisons, Sara Shelton Mann, Eiko + Koma, Joan Jonas, Guillermo Gomez-Pena, Ann Hamilton, Marina Abramovic, and more. The exhibition is the fourth exhibition in an ongoing series exploring contemporary topics in California through photography.

Presented by Oakland Museum of California.

$10-15; $6 9-17, 8 & under free, OMCA Mbrs free

Alone, Georgia (Otar Iosseliani; France, 1994)

Sunday, February 15th, 2015 - Sunday, February 15th, 2015, 2:00pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Otar Iosseliani's fascinating four-hour documentary presents the history of this former Soviet republic through interwoven images of landscapes, artwork, footage from the civil war, and clips from other Georgian filmmakers’ films. “He illuminates the part played by two politicians, both KGB men but with very different destinies: Gamashurdia, an ultranationalistic demagogue who died in exile; and Shevernadze, who would become president of Georgia. Alone, Georgia gives a spellbinding evocation of this beautiful, hospitable land, and of its culture, which has had a profound influence on other countries, notably Russia, whose best writers, from Tolstoy to Pasternak, have revered the Georgian people and their arts”(Olga Andreyev Carlisle).

• Written by Iosseliani. Photographed by Nugzar Erkomaishvili. (240 mins plus two intermissions, Narration in English, Color, Betacam SP PAL, BAM/PFA Collection)

The Apartment (Billy Wilder; US, 1960)

Sunday, February 15th, 2015 - Sunday, February 15th, 2015, 7:00pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Winner of five Academy Awards!

After dressing down the fifties with Some Like It Hot, director Wilder comes out swingin’ for the liberated sixties. Bud Baxter (Jack Lemmon) is a low-level lackey at an insurance company who trades the use of his bachelor pad for promotional benefits. A parade of philandering managers passes through, complicated further when the head of HR (Fred MacMurray) begins ogling one of the building’s elevator operators (Shirley MacLaine). There’s nothing funnier than the gray flannel suit set in the throes of libidinous buffoonery. But hapless Bud realizes that for the possibility of happiness, he must shed his tightly tailored suit and get a life, not life insurance.

• Written by Wilder, I. A. L. Diamond. Photographed by Joseph LaShelle. With Jack Lemmon, Shirley MacLaine, Fred MacMurray, Ray Walston. (125 mins, B&W, ’Scope, DCP, From Park Circus)

Cassa Cassa! Danced Encounters Between Africa and Its Diaspora (Elodie Lefebvre; Senegal, 2013)

Tuesday, February 17th, 2015 - Tuesday, February 17th, 2015, 7:00pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

In 2007, an extraordinary gathering of choreographers, dancers, and musicians took place in a remote Senegalese village. Germaine Acogny—founder of the École des Sables, International Center for Traditional and Contemporary African Dances—invited artists from throughout Africa and its diaspora to participate in workshops and cultural exchanges. Cassa, Cassa! captures participants as they share their choreography, elucidating links between traditional and contemporary dance and discovering connections between their various cultures.
51 mins, In English, French, Spanish, Portuguese, with English subtitles, Color, Digital video

Preceded by:
Nora
(Alla Kovgan, David Hinton, US/UK/Mozambique, 2008)
Both a dreamlike biography of and showcase for Zimbabwe-born choreographer Nora Chipaumire.
(35 mins, Color, DigiBeta, From the artists)

Total running time: 86 mins

Short Films by Harun Farocki (Germany, 1983-2012)

Wednesday, February 18th, 2015 - Wednesday, February 18th, 2015, 7:00pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

In the first of two program paying tribute to Farocki's film and video work, we focus on his short filmss. In Farocki’s words: “Four days spent in a studio working on a centerfold photo for Playboy magazine provided the subject matter for (An Image) . . . The naked woman in the middle is a sun around which a system revolves: of culture, of business, of living!” I Thought I Was Seeing Convicts presents “images from the Maximum Security Prison in Corcoran, California . . . With the camera and the gun side by side, the field of view and field of fire merge together.” His most recent film, A New Product, consists of “scenes from meetings within a company, which advises corporations how to design their offices—and the work done there. The film shows that words are not just tools, they have become an object of speculation.”

An Image (1983, 25 mins, Color, Digital file, From Video Data Bank New Restoration!)

I Thought I Was Seeing Convicts (2000, 25 mins, Color, Digital file, From Video Data Bank)

A New Product (2012, 37 mins, Color, Digital file, From Video Data Bank)

Total running time: 87 mins

Short Films by Mati Diop (France, 2009–12)

Thursday, February 19th, 2015 - Thursday, February 19th, 2015, 7:00pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

“The films of Mati Diop conjure faraway places. Characters both fictional and quasi-documentary long for locales beyond their reach, or sometimes, as if in a trance, they drift magnetically toward them. No matter where the films take place, there is always the specter of somewhere else, and, perhaps with it, the possibility of a different life”(Genevieve Yue). In Atlantiques, a young man from Dakar reveals to some friends his dreams for a better life in Europe; Big Vietnam depicts the filming of an adaptation of Dangerous Liaisons in Marseille; and Snow Canon is a sensual coming-of-age story loosely based on Stendahl's short story "Vanina Vanini."

Atlantiques (Senegal/France, 2009, 15 mins, Color, Digital File, From LeFresnoy)

Big in Vietnam (France, 2012, 28 mins, Color, DCP, From Neon)

Snow Canon (France, 2011, 33 mins, Color, 35mm, From Aurora Films)

Total running time: 76 mins

Oakland East Bay Symphony to Premiere New Mads Tolling Violin Concerto

Friday, February 20th, 2015 - Friday, February 20th, 2015, 2/20/15, 8:00 PM - 10:00 PM

The Paramount Theatre
2025 Broadway

In Oakland

The world premiere of a new violin concerto entitled Begejstring ("Excitement") by popular jazz composer/violinist Mads Tolling will headline the Oakland East Bay Symphony's February 20, 2015 concert with Tolling as soloist at the Paramount Theatre conducted by Music Director Michael Morgan. The evening will also include Haydn's Mass in Time of War with the Oakland Symphony Chorus and Samuel Barber's Symphony No. 1 (Symphony in One Movement), conducted by Assistant Conductor Brian Nies. Haydn's Mass in Time of War will feature the Oakland Symphony Chorus, Lynne Morrow, Director; and Soloists from San Francisco Opera Center's Adler Fellowship Program including Julie Adams, soprano; Zanda Svede, mezzo-soprano; Chong Wang, tenor; and Anthony Michael Read, bass.

The concert is sponsored in part by Chevron and the premiere of Mads Tolling's work is part of New Visions/New Vistas Commissioning Project, supported by a grant from The James Irvine Foundation. A pre-concert talk with John Kendall Bailey will be given at 7 pm and is free to ticket-holders.

Presented by Oakland East Bay Symphony.

$20-$70.

A Thousand Suns (Mati Diop; France/Senegal, 2013)

Friday, February 20th, 2015 - Friday, February 20th, 2015, 7:30pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

(Mille soleils)
Mati Diop's first feature looks back at her uncle Djibril Diop Mambéty's first feature film, the radically hybrid Touki Bouki, which tells the story of Magaye Niang and his girlfriend, who dream of leaving Senegal. Now, decades later, in Diop's equally hybrid film fusing documentary and fantasy, Magaye reminisces about his life and decision not to emigrate. "Nothing is true and nothing is false in my film. The friction and two-way shuttling between reality and myth is the main subject."

• Photographed by Diop, Héléne Louvart (45 mins, In French and Wolof with English subtitles, Color, DCP, From Anna Sanders Films)

Jazz Art

Saturday, February 21st, 2015 - Saturday, February 21st, 2015, 1 - 3 pm

Richmond Art Center
2540 Barrett Ave

In Richmond

Listen to acclaimed musicians, India Cooke and Don Robinson, and let their music inspire you to make art. This hands-on art-making event is perfect for everyone in your family to get in the groove and express themselves by drawing, painting or collaging. Materials are provided by the Art Center, but feel free to bring your own. All ages. Children under 12 must be accompanied by an adult.

Big Green Valley (Merab Kokochashvili; USSR, 1968)

Saturday, February 21st, 2015 - Saturday, February 21st, 2015, 6:15 PM

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Imported Print!

The modern world comes to a forsaken section of the Soviet empire in Merab Kokochashvili’s neorealist village drama, one of the most singularly pessimistic works of sixties Soviet film. “Whether he likes it or not, life will bring him here,” states a collective figurehead outside a newly built worker’s hall; he’s referring to our hero Sosana, a burly sheepherder who could care less about answering to anyone, much less living in the modern new town going up nearby. But oil is coming, and with it changes that will leave Sosana with little choice. “Is everything lost forever?” he wonders, as he wanders through the region’s constant fog. Voicing the film’s underlying theme of hopelessness, his wife, meanwhile, can only mutter, “I don’t want to die in this godforsaken place.” Offering neither John Ford-like optimism nor Communist-era visions of collective good, and created during a brief thaw in Soviet censorship, Big Green Valley is refreshingly, almost shockingly unsentimental, and a willful thumb in the eye to both progress and tradition.

• Written by Merab Eliozishvili. Photographed by Giorgi Gersamia. With David Abashidze, Lia Kapandze, Mzia Maglakelidze, Ilia Bakakuri. (80 mins, In Georgian with English electronic titling, B&W, 35mm, From Arsenal—Institute for Film and Video Art)

35 Shots of Rum (Claire Denis; France, 2008)

Saturday, February 21st, 2015 - Saturday, February 21st, 2015, 8:00pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

(35 rhums)
Claire Denis has created a sensual and contemplative body of films over the years, but nothing in her work prepares us for this deeply emotional yet light-of-touch story set among a small circle of Parisians and their friends. In fact, Denis evokes nothing so much as Eric Rohmer in his “seasons” quartet as she follows the various characters in a roundelay of relationships that touches on almost every kind of love there is: father-daughter, old lovers, old colleagues, absent mother, lost sister, unrequited, one-night, budding, brooding . . . Lionel (Alex Descas), a train engineer, shares an apartment with his daughter Jo (Mati Diop), a university student. In the same building live taxi driver Gabrielle (Nicole Dogué) and a young man who comes and goes, Noe (the intense and always mysterious Grégoire Colin, like Descas a Denis regular). Together, they are a kind of family. We figure out their roles and relationships only gradually as Denis leaves crumbs along her narrative path for us to follow—it’s one of the great pleasures of this extraordinarily pleasurable film made up of small moments, of looks and silences, of magical touches of physicality and pensiveness. (Judy Bloch)

Mati Diop, who plays the daughter, observed, "I know that acting has enormously enriched and rendered more concrete my relationship to writing and to my actors but I cannot precisely explain this relationship. My experience working with Claire Denis on 35 rhums has particularly affected me. I wouldn’t know where what she conveyed to me begins or ends. It’s huge."

• Written by Denis, Jean-Pol Fargeau. Photographed by Agnès Godard. With Alex Descas, Mati Diop, Grégoire Colin, Nicole Dogué. (100 mins, In French with English subtitles, Color, 35mm, From Institut Français, permission Cinema Guild)

Lunar New Year Celebration & Other Asian Traditions: Year of the Sheep

Sunday, February 22nd, 2015 - Sunday, February 22nd, 2015, 2/22/15, 12:00 PM - 4:30 PM

Oakland Museum of California
1000 Oak Street

In Oakland

Don't miss an annual favorite, as the Oakland Museum of California rings in the Year of the Sheep with a fortune-filled event for the whole family. Elements of Chinese, Korean, Vietnamese, Japanese, Indian, and other Asian cultures will be featured in the daylong celebration, including an array of traditions in dance, music, crafts, food, family-friendly activities, and more.

The celebration kicks off with a traditional Chinese lion dance and New Year songs performed by Dharma Realm Chinese Orchestra. Performances by amazing student groups take center stage, including a Chinese yo-yo group from Foothill High School and students from UC Berkeley performing Korean pop dances. A Shanghai-born juggler and acrobat, Xia Kemin, will present a plate-spinning comedy show, and The Magic of Jade will delight with astonishing illusions. Celebrate with rousing drumming performances, from Taiko by Jiten Daiko, to 24 Festive Drum performance by Developing Virtue Secondary School, to Ong Dance Company performing Samgo-Mu, or Korean Drum Dance.

Demonstrations and hands-on activities will engage the whole family, from Vietnamese spring roll making, Korean wrapping cloths, Japanese handmade dolls, Ikebana flower arrangements, and Chinese calligraphy. Story time and a petting zoo will delight young visitors.. Visitors can adorn themselves festively with henna art and Chinese Opera-style face painting. The celebration will close with a fiery dragon dance!

Treat the family and discover the diversity of Asian New Year traditions practiced across the globe!

Included with Museum admission. Children 8 and under are admitted free. Free to OMCA Members.

Conveniently located one block from Lake Merritt BART.

Enjoy secure parking in OMCA's Oak Street garage. $1 per hour for Museum visitors with ticket validation.

Presented by Oakland Museum of California.

$10-15; $6 9-17, 8 & under free, OMCA Mbrs free

Main Stage Concert: Lara+Lara (Berkeley)

Sunday, February 22nd, 2015 - Sunday, February 22nd, 2015, 2/22/15, 3:00 PM - 5:00 PM

First Congregational Church
2345 Channing Way

In Berkeley

Benjamin Simon, conductor
Lara Nie, mezzo-soprano
Lara Downes, piano

Maria Schneider - Carlos Drummond de Andrade Stories (2013) [West Coast premiere]
Robert Schumann - Piano Concerto in A Minor, Op. 54

Fresh from her success at our 2014 Gala, mezzo-soprano Lara Nie returns for the West Coast premiere of jazz leader Maria Schneider's triple-Grammy-winning 2013 Stories, based on works by Carlos Drummond de Andrade, one of Brazil's greatest poets. Also making her SFCO Main Stage debut is Bay Area pianist Lara Downes, "a magnetic force wrapped in flawless technique and a silken touch" (Musical Toronto). This Lara will perform the hauntingly beautiful Romantic piano concerto that Robert Schumann composed for his beloved wife, Clara.

Great music worth listening to. Classical masterpieces, unusual gems, and modern works offer a feast for your ears at every concert, while Maestro Simon's engaging onstage talks help you connect more powerfully with the music. Concerts are generally 90 to 120 minutes in length, with an intermission.

Admission is free to all concertgoers! Supporting members receive priority seating and priority entrance 60 minutes before concert time -- please bring your membership card with you. Non-members may enter 45 minutes before concert time.

Presented by San Francisco Chamber Orchestra.

$0 (Admission-Free!).

Images of the World and the Inscription of War Harun Farocki (Germany, 1988)

Tuesday, February 24th, 2015 - Tuesday, February 24th, 2015, 7:00pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

(Bilder der Welt und Inschrift des Krieges)
Images of the World is a striking example of Farocki's fascination with sight and image-making. "An impressive meditation on aerial photography, surveillance, and military research, this film reveals and examines the disturbing fact that Auschwitz was photographed by U.S. flyers on a bombing mission to Silesia. But the camp was not recognized by the British evaluators 'who were not under orders to look for the camps and therefore did not find them,' despite the fact that they are clearly visible in the photographs. Today, says Harun Farocki, 'Satellites orbit the earth and record constantly almost everything that happens on the planet. How can these pictures be analyzed? How shall these pictures be remembered? Remember, the victims noticed nothing.' The film ranges over the history of aerial photography and the shifts from artisanal to mechanized mass production. It links the totalitarian experiment of the Nazis with capitalism . . . Here documentary becomes a kind of fiction. Reality unfolds like a detective story".

• Photographed by Ingo Kratisch, Irina Hoppe. Narrated by Cynthia Beatt. (75 mins, In German with English subtitles, Color, 16mm, From Stiftung Deutsche Kinemathek)

Hapax Legomena (Hollis Frampton; US, 1971–72)

Wednesday, February 25th, 2015 - Wednesday, February 25th, 2015, 7:00pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

New 16mm Prints!

Hapax Legomena is Hollis Frampton’s great serial work. The seven films of the series work independently, but function within the series to designate several arcs: the history of visual media (moving from still photography through the written script, film, video, animation/pixilation, and television to the dynamic frame); the parameters of sound and film (the series alternates silence and sound—spoken voice, sound montage, nonsync sound-on-tape, and electronic synthesizer); and finally, what Frampton describes as “oblique autobiography,” from the stories told over burning photographs in (nostalgia) to his bodily rhythms inscribed in the vibrations of the hand-held camera of Special Effects.

(nostalgia) (1971, 36 mins, B&W, 16mm, From Film-Maker’s Coop)

Poetic Justice (1972, 31:30 mins@24 fps, B&W, Silent, 16mm, From Film-Maker’s Coop)

Critical Mass (1971, 25:30 mins, B&W, 16mm, From Film-Maker’s Coop)

Travelling Matte (1971, 33:30 mins@16 fps, B&W, Silent, 16mm, From Film-Maker’s Coop)

Ordinary Matter (1972, 36 mins@16 fps, B&W, Silent, 16mm, From Film-Maker’s Coop)

Remote Control (1972, 29 mins@16 fps, B&W/Color, Silent, 16mm, From Film-Maker’s Coop)

Special Effects (1972, 10:30 mins, B&W, 16mm, From Film-Maker’s Coop)

Total running time: 202 mins; there will be a 10-minute intermission between Critical Mass and Travelling Matte.

• All seven prints are newly struck from preservation negatives prepared by a collaborative project funded by the National Film Preservation Foundation and led by Bill Brand and the New York University Moving Image Archiving and Preservation Program, along with The Museum of Modern Art, New York, and Anthology Film Archives.

Keynote Lecture by Mark Sandberg: Spoiled! Trauma Time and Serial Knowledge

Thursday, February 26th, 2015 - Thursday, February 26th, 2015, 7:00pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Admission free!

UC Berkeley professor Mark Sandberg holds a joint appointment in the Departments of Film and Media and Scandinavian

The advent of social media within post-9/11 American culture has created conditions in which long-form serial television has flourished. If a central experience of the current low-grade emergency culture in the US is the potential for traumatic information to reach us at any moment, serial television offers the opposite—the pleasures of delay, the incremental leak of narrative information, the depiction of characters who know less than we do. This combined lecture and television clip screening—using the series Mad Men as a point of departure—surveys recent serial television’s creation of a spoiler-sensitive culture and explains what is at stake.

Total running time: 100 mins

Berkeley Symphony: Imagination

Thursday, February 26th, 2015 - Thursday, February 26th, 2015, 8-10pm

Zellerbach Hall
101 Zellerbach Hall #4800, Berkeley, CA 94720

In Berkeley

Maurice Ravel’s delightful Mother Goose Suite opens the program. A series of illustrations of French fairy tales was the inspiration behind this piece, which started out as a piano duet, then was expanded to a ballet, from which this orchestra suite was derived. Jake Heggie’s Camille Claudel: Into the Fire was premiered to great acclaim as a song cycle for mezzo-soprano and string quartet in San Francisco in 2012. Berkeley Symphony commissioned Mr. Heggie to write the orchestral version, which receives its world premiere with the enchanting Sasha Cooke as soloist. This performance closes with Brahms’ powerful Fourth Symphony, completed only a year after the premiere of his Third Symphony.

The Chinatown Mystery (Parts 1–10) (J.P. McGowan; US, 1928)

Friday, February 27th, 2015 - Friday, February 27th, 2015, 7:00pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Restored by the George Eastman House in 2001, this 1928 serial was considered a “last hurrah” for the silent-era serial, and brought together some of the biggest names of the era: director J.P. McGowan, actors Francis Ford and Joe Bonomo (a carnival strongman-turned-actor), producer Trem Carr (who would later help found Monogram Pictures), and a slew of silent-era supporting icons such as Ruth Hiatt, Grace Cunard, and more. Chapter names like “The Clutching Claw,” “The Devil’s Dice, “Galloping Fury,” and “The Invisible Hand” offer all one needs to know of the film’s concerns: to promise and deliver as much action and suspense as possible, and move our intrepid hero and heroine from one perilous situation to another. One of the biggest stars of the early silent era and a successful serials director in his own right, Francis Ford was the brother of director John Ford.

• Written by Francis Ford, McGowan. With Joe Bonomo, Ruth Hiatt, Francis Ford, Paul Malvern. (180 mins, plus intermission, Silent, B&W, 35mm, From George Eastman House)

Repentance (Tengiz Abuladze; USSR, 1984/1987)

Saturday, February 28th, 2015 - Saturday, February 28th, 2015, 5:45pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Imported 35mm Print!
Back by Popular Demand!

In the former Soviet Union, Repentance was as much an event as a film: one of the most important of the censored films to come off the shelf with the new cultural liberalization of the late 1980s, it was the first to deal with the terrors of the Stalin era. This it does in an oblique but unmistakable way typical of Abuladze, whose art is one of symbolism and surrealism. The central character is a parody of a dictator with attributes of Stalin, Hitler, and Mussolini. Abuladze’s allegorical parable is at once specific to the memory of the actual historical horrors, and general to a Kafkaesque collective memory of tyranny.

• Written by Abuladze, Rezo Kveselava, Nana Janelidze. Photographed by Mikhail Agranovitj. With Avtandil Makharadze, Iji Ninidze, Merab Ninidze, Zejnab Botsvadze. (153 mins, In Georgian with English electronic titling, Color, 35mm, From Arsenal)

The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes (Billy Wilder; US/UK, 1970)

Saturday, February 28th, 2015 - Saturday, February 28th, 2015, 8:40pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In

Opening with a lengthy boondoggle designed to establish Sherlock Holmes's sexual proclivities and, in true Wilder fashion, leaving the question wide open, The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes is riddled with false clues, beginning with its title. Wilder and screenwriter I.A.L. Diamond play with a typically hyperbolic adventure involving twenty-four canaries, eight Trappist monks, six midgets, and guest appearances by Holmes' own Machiavellian brother Mycroft and the queen of all Victorian heroines, Victoria herself. Here is a film that revels in its artifice, and in the bold theatrics under which all—Holmes, the helpless heroine, and perhaps even the ingenuous Watson—hide their private lives. Robert Stevens plays Holmes with a Wilderesque mixture of bitter sardonicism and false naiveté, at once inviting us into and shutting us out of his inner world. Trapped in the mind's work, trapped in sexual ambivalence under the parasol of Victorian womanhood, trapped in the eye of his worshipful biographer and in the fiction of his life, in short, he is trapped on the screen. When this Holmes shuts his bedroom door on us, retreating with his needle, we might well conclude that Wilder's is, indeed, the last of the great Sherlock Holmeses.

• Written by Wilder, I.A.L. Diamond. Photographed by Christopher Challis. With Robert Stevens, Colin Blakely, Genevieve Page, Christopher Lee. (125 mins, Color, ‘Scope, 35mm, From Park Circus)

The Art of Living Black: Open Studio

Saturday, March 7th, 2015 - Saturday, March 7th, 2015, 11 am - 5 pm

Richmond Art Center
2540 Barrett Ave

In Richmond

This one-day art fair and gallery sale is a unique opportunity to meet The Art of Living Black artists and purchase their work. View works by sculptors, painters, jewelry makers, mixed media artists, photographers, ceramic artists and so much more.

See & Make Art

Saturday, March 7th, 2015 - Saturday, March 7th, 2015, 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM

Richmond Art Center
2540 Barrett Ave

In Richmond

Join us for our free, first Saturday bilingual art tours! Come and enjoy a guided tour of the Richmond Art Center's four galleries and a hands-on art making activity! Open to all ages. Families welcome.

Please meet the group in the Madeline F. Whittlesey Community Room at the Richmond Public Library, Main Branch (325 Civic Center Plaza) and we’ll walk as a group over to the Art Center.

Sundays @ Four: Jay Campbell

Sunday, March 8th, 2015 - Sunday, March 8th, 2015, 3/8/15, 4:00 PM - 7:00 PM

Crowden Music Center
1475 Rose Street

In Berkeley

Come meet and watch Crowden School Alumnus and cellist, Jay Campbell, and pianist Conor Hanick perform at Crowden's Sundays @ Four chamber music series on March 8th at 4pm.

Cellist Jay Campbell, who has performed as concerto soloist in the world's most prestigious halls, began his cello career here at Crowden, as an eight-year old beginner.

Armed with a diverse spectrum of repertoire and eclectic musical interests, Jay was recently named First Prize winner of the 2012 Concert Artist Guild auditions. He is the recipient of awards from the BMI and ASCAP foundations and has been heard on television, radio broadcasts and in concert halls around the world.

Jay made his debut with the New York Philharmonic this past season performing the music of Tan Dun. He has collaborated with an array of artists ranging from composers including Elliott Carter, Pierre Boulez, Magnus Lindberg, and John Adams, to members of Radiohead and Einsturzende Neubauten, and has premiered nearly one hundred works to date, including concertos by Chris Rogerson and David Lang. Jay has had the privilege of collaborating with leading ensembles throughout the globe including ICE, Ensemble InterContemporain, the Da Capo Chamber Players, and members of the Arditti, Takacs, Kronos, and Afiara string quartets.

Highlights of the upcoming season include a debut solo CD on CAG Records and chamber works on Tzadik; appearances at Carnegie Hall, National Gallery, Krannert Center, Mondavi Center, and the Heidelberg Festival; and the premieres of new works written for Jay by John Zorn, Eric Wubbels, Oscar Bianchi, and David Fulmer. Jay began playing the cello at the age of 8 at the Crowden School in Berkeley, CA., and studied with Fred Sherry.

Program:

Debussy Violin Sonata
Stravinsky Suite Italienne (after Pulcinella)
Elliott Carter Elegy
David Fulmer new work for cello/piano
Brahms Sonata No. 1 in D major

Presented by Crowden Music Center.

Free to $25.

Steffani Stabat Mater

Sunday, March 22nd, 2015, 7:30pm

St. Mary Magdalen Church
2005 Berryman Street

In Berkeley

An all-star cast performs Agostino Steffani’s baroque masterpiece, Stabat Mater, and the Carissimi oratorio Vanitas, Vanitatum.

Jennifer Ellis Kampani & Céline Ricci, sopranos
Clifton Massey, countertenor
Paul Elliott & Christopher LeCluyse, tenors
John Bischoff, bass
Elizabeth Blumenstock & Kati Kyme, baroque violin
Lisa Grodin, baroque viola
Adaiha MacAdam-Somer, baroque cello
Farley Pearce, violone
David Tayler, theorbo
Hanneke van Proosdij, organ

Thursday, March 19, 2015, 8 pm
All Saints Episcopal Church
555 Waverley Street, Palo Alto

Friday, March 20, 2015, 8 pm
St. Stephen's Episcopal Church
3 Bayview Avenue, Belvedere

Saturday, March 21, 2015, 8 pm
St. Mark's Lutheran Church
1111 O'Farrell Street, San Francisco

Berkeley Symphony: I'm a Performer Family Concert

Saturday, April 11th, 2015 - Saturday, April 11th, 2015, 10am and 11:30am

Malcom X Middle School
1731 Prince Street

In Berkeley

Rosin your bow and polish your horn! Get ready for this one-of-a-kind opportunity to perform alongside professional orchestra musicians! An annual tradition at Berkeley Symphony, “I’m a Performer!” family concerts are open to all music lovers, instrumentalists and singers alike. Together, you and the orchestra will perform popular tunes, including “Ode to Joy” and our signature tune, “I Am a Fine Musician.” Concerts are FREE.

Berkeley Symphony and Friends Chamber Music Series

Sunday, April 12th, 2015 - Sunday, April 12th, 2015, 5-7pm

Piedmont Center for the Arts
801 Magnolia Avenue, Piedmont, CA 94611

In

The Piedmont Center for the Arts will host a series of four chamber music concerts featuring Berkeley Symphony musicians and their guests. Artists: Dan Flanagan, violin; Elizabeth Prior, viola; Jonah Kim, cello; Miles Graber, piano. Presenting works by Ravel and Fauré. Tickets are $25.

Sundays @ Four: Fry Street Quartet

Sunday, April 19th, 2015 - Sunday, April 19th, 2015, 4/19/15, 4:00 PM - 7:00 PM

Crowden Music Center
1475 Rose Street

In Berkeley

Violinist Robert Waters brings his world-famous Fry Street Quartet to close the Sundays @ Four chamber music series on April 19th at 4PM at Crowden.

Hailed as "a triumph of ensemble playing" (New York Times), Fry Street Quartet has perfected a "blend of technical precision and scorching spontaneity" (Strad). Since securing the Millennium Grand Prize at the Fischoff National Chamber Music Competition, Fry Street Quartet has reached audiences from Carnegie Hall to Sarajevo and Jerusalem, exploring the medium of the string quartet and its life-affirming potential with "profound understanding, ...depth of expression, and stunning technical astuteness" (Deseret Morning News).

Fry Street Quartet began its international career in 2002 as cultural ambassadors to the Balkan States, sponsored by Carnegie Hall and the U.S. Department of State. This tour featured the European debut of J. Mark Scearce's Y2K, commissioned for Fry Street. Subsequent international appearances have included France, the Czech Republic, Austria and Brazil. The quartet performed its first complete Beethoven Quartet Cycle presented at Utah State University in 2008.

Present projects include working with composer Michael Ellison on a commission to be premiered this season, as well as composer Laura Kaminsky in a multi-disciplinary performance with physicist Dr. Robert Davies, called The Crossroads Project, which employs original music, art, information, and imagery in contemplation our relationship to our Earth System.

Fry Street received rave reviews as prizewinners at the Fischoff Competition, Yellow Springs Competition, and the Banff International String Quartet Competition.

Program:
Haydn Quartet in D minor, Op.76 No. 2, Quinten
Bartok Quartet No. 2
Beethoven Quartet in E-flat Major, Op.127

Presented by Crowden Music Center.

Free to $25.

Berkeley Symphony: Homage

Thursday, April 30th, 2015 - Thursday, April 30th, 2015, 8-10pm

Zellerbach Hall
101 Zellerbach Hall #4800, Berkeley, CA 94720

In Berkeley

First produced in 1991, John Adams’ opera The Death of Klinghoffer is based on the hijacking of the passenger liner Achille Lauro by the Palestine Liberation Front in 1995, and the resulting murder of Jewish-American passenger Leon Klinghoffer. Mozart’s Requiem was composed in Vienna in 1791, during the last year of the composer’s life. Though considered one of Mozart’s most popular and respected works, the question remains as to how much of the music he actually completed before his death and how much was later composed by others. The Orchestra is joined by soloists from the Adler Fellowship Program of the San Francisco Opera Center and the choruses from the University of California, Berkeley.

Under Construction

Saturday, May 2nd, 2015 - Saturday, May 2nd, 2015, 3pm

Osher Studio
2055 Center Street

In Berkeley

Working in collaboration with EarShot: the National Orchestral Composition Discovery Network, and its partner organizations – the American Composers Forum, League of American Orchestras, New Music USA and the American Composers Orchestra – Berkeley Symphony will expand its Under Construction New Music Series/Composers Program. Participating composers receive artistic and career guidance from Music Director Joana Carneiro and mentor composers, as well as from the orchestra musicians. Tickets are $10.

Under Construction II

Sunday, May 3rd, 2015 - Sunday, May 3rd, 2015, 7-9pm

Osher Studio
2055 Center Street

In Berkeley

Working in collaboration with EarShot: the National Orchestral Composition Discovery Network, and its partner organizations – the American Composers Forum, League of American Orchestras, New Music USA and the American Composers Orchestra – Berkeley Symphony will expand its Under Construction New Music Series/Composers Program. Participating composers receive artistic and career guidance from Music Director Joana Carneiro and mentor composers, as well as from the orchestra musicians.

In My Life - A Musical Theatre Tribute to the Beatles

Monday, May 18th, 2015 - Monday, May 18th, 2015, 7:30 pm

Bankhead Theater
2400 First Street LIvermore

In Richmond

You already know and love the songs, but In My Life: A Musical Theatre Tribute to the Beatles gives you a chance to get a fresh perspective on the story of the band that made them. More than just a live musical tribute show, In My Life tells the Fab Four's tale through the eyes of their late manager, Brian Epstein, who acts as narrator to renowned tribute band Abbey Road's live performance of some 33 Beatles classics. From their groundbreaking appearance on the Ed Sullivan Show to their final rooftop performance at the Apple Corp. offices, and "I Want to Hold Your Hand" to the psychedelic era of Sgt. Pepper's and beyond, this exciting production gives new life to the story of rock's greatest band.



© 2015 510 Arts