Events


Kozmik Kirtan with Evelie Posch & Kismat-Mahal Ens (KSME)

Sunday, February 15th, 2015 - Sunday, February 21st, 2016, 7:00 PM

Yoga Tree Telegraph
2807 Telegraph Avenue

In Berkeley

Kismat-Mahal Ensemble {KSME} led by Evelie Delfino Såles Posch blends intercultural/interfaith meditation, singing and a circle dance, to connect with the divine and all beings; for healing, remembering wholeness; for peace of heart-mind; to grow compassion and loving-kindness.

With many players including Cait McWhir on harmonium, voice; Lisa Wellhausen on flute; Revi Airborne on violin, voice; Suellen Primost on cello, voice.

When: 3rd Sundays ~ Feb 15 (3/15, 4/ 19, 5/17, 6/21, 7/19, 8/16, 9/20, 10/18, 11/15, 12/20, 1/17/2016, 2/21/2016 etc.). And there is kirtan EVERY Sunday with other leaders/groups.

Where: 2807 Telegraph Ave Berkeley (at Stuart St)

Sliding scale $15 to $30 suggested love donation.

Q's/info: Evelie 650-275-3884 {ASK-EVVI}


Overloaded

Saturday, January 9th, 2016 - Saturday, February 13th, 2016, 4:00 pm

Rhythmix Cultural Works
2513 Blanding Avenue

In Oakland

The artists featured in Overloaded respond to the frenzied realities of the Information Age with translations of the everyday that mix synthetic materials, pop culture references, a desire for human connection, and the beauty of surfaces. From the expansive to the pared back, from the interactive to the layered, their works explore cultural histories, family narratives, intracellular processes, personal transformation, and field notes and color studies on friendship. Additional ephemera from each artist’s studio provides context and insight into their practices, as well as a reflection on how they filter the world through a distinctive artistic lens. With a reading from New York Times Magazine critic-at-large Wesley Morris on “The Year We Obsessed Over Identity.”

The Art of Living Black

Tuesday, January 12th, 2016 - Thursday, March 3rd, 2016, 10am - 5pm

Richmond Art Center
2540 Barrett Ave.

In Richmond

In the Main & West Galleries
The Art of Living Black: Our American Experience 20th Anniversary

Now celebrating its 20th anniversary, we look to some of the deeply resonating art presented in this annual tradition of spotlighting the most extraordinary and striking work of the moment.

Admission to the galleries is free.

Lewis Watts: New Orleans

Tuesday, January 12th, 2016 - Thursday, March 3rd, 2016, 10am - 5pm

Richmond Art Center
2540 Barrett Ave.

In

In the South Gallery
Lewis Watts: New Orleans

With an eye for detail and an ear to the cadence of the city, photographer Lewis Watts has created a body of work reflecting the perseverance and spirit of the people of New Orleans.

Admission to the gallery is free.

Family Portraits

Tuesday, January 12th, 2016 - Thursday, March 3rd, 2016, 10am - 5pm

Richmond Art Center
2540 Barrett Ave.

In Richmond

COMMUNITY GALLERY:
Family Portraits

We asked artists across California to share their family portraits with us. Here is a show of who we are with whom we share our lives.

Admission to the galleries is free.

Opening Reception: Winter Exhibitions

Tuesday, January 12th, 2016 - Thursday, March 3rd, 2016, Saturday, Feb 6, 2-5pm

Richmond Art Center
2540 Barrett Ave.

In Richmond

Reception: Saturday, February 6, 2 – 5 pm

MAIN & WEST GALLERIES:
The Art of Living Black: Our American Experience 20th Anniversary Exhibition

Now celebrating its 20th anniversary, we look to some of the deeply resonating art presented in this annual tradition of spotlighting the most extrodinary and striking work of the moment.

SOUTH GALLERY:
Lewis Watts:
New Orleans

With an eye for detail and an ear to the cadence of the city, photographer Lewis Watts has created a body of work reflecting the perserverance and spirit of the people of New Orleans.

COMMUNITY GALLERY:
Family Portraits

We asked artists across California to share their family portraits with us. Here is a show of who we are with whom we share our lives.


Gallery Hours: Tue – Sat, 10 am – 5 pm & Sun, noon – 5 pm
Exhibitions are free and open to the public.

Winter Exhibition
January 12 – March 3, 2016

Professional Development Series with Michelle Pred

Saturday, January 16th, 2016 - Saturday, February 27th, 2016, 6pm

Berkeley Art Center
1275 Walnut Street

In Berkeley

Prepare yourself! A Two-Part Professional Development Series
with artist Michele Pred

Saturday, January 16 at 6 pm
Saturday, February 27 at 6 pm

$20 for two sessions for BAC Members / $40 Nonmembers
Oakland-based artist Michele Pred has become known for such political works as her Homeland Security series and feminist Pred-a-Porter purses. Her artwork has been exhibited in galleries, art fairs and museums in London, Sydney, New York, Bologna, Miami, Los Angeles, Chicago and San Francisco. She has been teaching professional practices to artists for ten years, currently as Adjunct Professor at CCA.

In these two sessions, Michele will offer valuable tips on presenting your work to gallerists and collectors, utilizing social media, writing press releases and maneuvering the evolving world of art fairs and competitions. Space is limited, please click on the appropriate price above to register online or email your RSVP to programs@berkeleyartcenter.org.

Crystallography

Thursday, January 21st, 2016 - Saturday, February 27th, 2016, 12-5

SLATE contemporary
473 25th St

In Oakland

SLATE is pleased to announce the opening exhibition for 2016, which will kick-off the opening of SLATE's new gallery space! Crystallography features paintings, photography, sculptures, and videos of urban-inspired artworks. Crystals are defined as solid materials whose constituents, such as atoms, molecules, or ions, are arranged in a highly ordered microscopic structure, forming a crystal lattice that extends in all directions. They are usually identifiable by their geometrical shape, consisting of flat faces with specific, characteristic orientations. One could equate the creation of buildings to the process of crystal growth; buildings are composed of small, rectangular features (iron rods, steel beams, windows, etc.) much like crystals are. The artworks in this exhibition work to accentuate the city's formation through crystallization. Peter Tonningsen, Henry Riekena, and Jamie Banes create their works through a build-up of small geometric shapes, which join together to form a larger whole. Liz Hickok creates her photographs and videos from a series of chemical reactions set within her designed props that eventually grow and create crystals. The connecting urban theme throughout these works comments on how cities are also formed from smaller units such as buildings, parks, and blocks.

The Gamester

Friday, January 22nd, 2016 - Saturday, February 20th, 2016, Jan 22-23, 8pm to 10pm, Jan 29-30, 8pm to 10pm, Jan 31, 2pm to 4pm, Feb 5-6, 8pm to 10pm, Feb 7, 2pm to 4pm, Feb 12-13, 8pm to 10pm, Feb 14, 2pm to 4pm, Feb 19-20, 8pm to 10pm

Masquers Playhouse
105 Park Place

In

The Gamester is a glittering farce set in a Baroque Paris riddled with too much wealth, too much leisure time, too many casinos, too few women with any sort of real power, and too many ways of avoiding reality. Valere, a compulsive gambler, hilariously struggles between his affection for the woman he loves and his passion for the game.

Presented by Masquers Playhouse.

$25

WE WISH THAT WE WERE WHAT WE ONCE WERE, BACK WHEN WE WANTED TO BE WHAT WE ARE NOW

Saturday, January 30th, 2016 - Sunday, March 13th, 2016

The Compound Gallery
1167 65th st.

In Oakland

These are grim times. The world seems increasingly insane, filled with avarice, indifference, and pointless suffering. And David Fullarton appears to be intent on making matters worse. Here is an artist who apparently finds our atrocious situation endlessly amusing. Laughing in the face of looming disaster, mocking our fears and anxieties and ridiculing the absurdity of modern existence, he demonstrates no respect for the seriousness of our malaise. This latest assortment of abject scrawls continues his dubious chronicle of mania and melancholy, of lives infested with quiet desperation and bitter regret. We would advise prudent individuals to avoid it at all cost.

Naked Childhood (Maurice Pialat France, 1968)

Friday, February 5th, 2016 - Saturday, February 20th, 2016, 02/05 at 6:30PM, 02/20 at 8:30PM

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

It is easy to see why Truffaut was a keen supporter of Pialat's first feature, which recalls The 400 Blows in its semi-autobiographical story of a young boy lashing out at life, and being passed from one foster family to another as he proves increasingly unmanageable. When he is placed in the home of an elderly couple, young François at last discovers a kind of peace, and can begin to discover the world. Pialat made excellent use of nonprofessional actors—the affectionate old couple essentially play themselves—leading Richard Peña to comment, "these actors inhabit their roles, and their world, in ways rarely achieved in cinema." In Pialat's unique treatment of the theme, as Jean-Pierre Gorin notes in Film Comment, "we are made to experience what is at the core of the foster child's life . . . The pathos of L'enfance nue is all about the zig and the zag of disconnection and thwarted emotions."

Preceded by:
Love Exists (L’amour existe) (Maurice Pialat, France, 1960).
Pialat displays a wicked sense of humor allied with his more familiar gift of social observation in this sardonic meditation on suburbia—its neglect and cultural decay—shot in poetic black-and-white.

Part of the Love Exists: The Films of Maurice Pialat series at the BAMPFA.

Free gallery admission with same-day film ticket!

Livia Stein: New Work

Friday, February 5th, 2016 - Saturday, March 19th, 2016, 6-9pm

Transmission Gallery
770 West Grand Ave.

In Oakland

Transmission Gallery is pleased to present its second solo exhibition of the work of Livia Stein. The artist will be exhibiting new paintings, monotypes and works on paper within her prolific art practice. These works are a continuation of her journey into the visual language of art. The artist’s work encompasses the idea that the narrative of art is beyond the power of words.

Stein says that the subjects and objects in her works are mirrors of her life representing a window for her memory and inclination. As with any life, it’s layered and complex. And like life, her art is to be discovered; to be re-read and re-visited over time. “A mark can be a day, an image a year, a whole drawing is all the pieces of the brain matter and memory that connects and falls apart with every attempt to hold onto it.”

The subjects of the works in the show are an exploration into the relationships between humans and animals and a reflection on how humans live. It’s the start of a visual conversation to be explored. Stein does not require a quick answer to a complex narrative but simply “posing a question and floating it in the air is quite enough.”

"I paint and give a nod to the words akin to someone waving at a tornado full of bombastic fragments. These particles all swirl around and finally settle down quietly to contemplate a visual poem, the poem itself lacking all words." - Livia Stein

Here, Part II What Cannot Be Said: Opening Reception

Saturday, February 6th, 2016 - Sunday, February 28th, 2016, 6 - 8 pm

Berkeley Art Center
1275 Walnut Street

In Berkeley

HERE, Part II
WHAT CANNOT BE SAID
Curated by Natasha Boas

Show Runs from January 30 – February 28, 2016
Opening Reception: Saturday, February 6, 2016, 6 - 8 pm

Exploring the theme of abstraction, guest curator Natasha Boas chose six artists: Katie Hawkinson, Edith Hillinger, Anthony Pinata, Nellie King Solomon, Rik Ritchey and Kimberly Rowe. In her statement, Boas writes, “In an increasingly troubled world, abstract painting also works as a consolation, it is not insistently relational or ideological, and allows for contemplation and reflection. Among the works in HERE, Part I, I was struck by the amount of abstraction presented and wanted to pose questions around an area of art practice that remains a through-line from modernism until now. These six artists show a dedication in their work to the investigation of abstraction—and reshape new abstraction through their unique investments in expanded practices”.

BAC congratulates all of the artists and invites you to a conversation with Curator Natasha Boas and BAMPFA Director Larry Rinder, titled What does it mean to think about abstraction? on Wednesday, February 24 at 6 pm.

Under the Sun of Satan (Maurice Pialat France, 1987)

Sunday, February 7th, 2016 - Friday, February 26th, 2016, 02/07 at 3PM, 02/26 at 6:30PM

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

The story of a priest (Depardieu), haunted equally by doubts and his own power, and dogged by Satan. Pialat is fearless in this beautiful, intense film about a man whose "cassock scares people." Depardieu's Father Donissan, a peasant by nature and birth, reveals his sufferings to his superior, a man for whom the cloth is a creature comfort (he is played by a cool Pialat). Such debate may be ageless, but Sandrine Bonnaire reminds us that we are in the present, as Mouchette, a girl both desired and despised, and a murderer, who is always shot in a golden light; she delivers an extraordinary monologue about lies and the self. For "seeing through" Mouchette's soul, Donissan is banished to a peasant parish, home again. Pialat adapted a novel by Bernanos, an author more famously filmed by Bresson (Diary of a Country Priest). If the hero's struggle here is similar, Pialat's is not. This is a film about character and class, behaviors and lies, the spoken, not the written word.

February 7th at 3pm
February 26th at 6:30pm

Part of the Love Exists: The Films of Maurice Pialat series at the BAMPFA.

Free gallery admission with same-day film ticket!

Point of Contact: Backstrap Weaving with Travis Meinolf

Sunday, February 7th, 2016 - Thursday, April 7th, 2016, 2/7 at 2PM, 3/10 at 6PM, 4/7 at 6PM

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

Join artist Travis Meinolf for a series of participatory, site-based weaving workshops using backstrap looms that physically connect the weaver to the new BAMPFA building.

“The backstrap loom is a simple tool for making cloth, for making connections. Once attached to a fixed point and strapped onto the body, it creates dynamic contact between the individual and the site, creating tension which can be used productively. In this series of explorations you will be invited to try backstrap weaving, or watch others work at this task, which has been performed throughout history, everywhere on the planet. The physical relationships we embody, and the decisions we make together about the cloth we create, provide new opportunities for reflection and discussion.”
—Travis Meinolf

Meinolf will also be building a basic floor loom and printing an instructional pamphlet on his design in the BAMPFA Art Lab. Go to actionweaver.com if you are interested in helping out.

Sunday, February 7th 2PM - 5PM
Thursday, March 10th 6PM - 8PM
Thursday, April 7th 6PM - 8PM

Workshops are included with BAMPFA admission.

Developing & Implementing Dance Curricula-B

Tuesday, February 9th, 2016 - Tuesday, May 17th, 2016, 6:00 pm to 9:00 pm

Berkeley Aquatic Park Studio
605 Addison Street

In Berkeley

LUNA DANCE presents: Developing & Implementing Dance Curricula-B a Foundation Series Course. Tuesday evenings: 6pm-9pm, starting February 9th until May 17, 2016 held at our Berkeley Aquatic Park Studio. This course investigates the role of teacher in creating, implementing and sequencing standards based dance curricula. DIDC-B content includes choreographic tools, principles, and structures, constructivism, and critical pedagogy. Fee is $525; pre-requisite DIDC-A or Summer Institute (SI). For more information and to register, contact Nia at nwomack-freeman@lunadanceinstitute.org, 510-883-1118.

Richard Wolff: Certainly We Can Do Better than Capitalism

Wednesday, February 10th, 2016 - Wednesday, February 10th, 2016, 2/10/16, 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM

First Congregational Church of Berkeley
2345 Channing Way

In Berkeley

Richard Wolff, an American Marxist economist, well known for his work in economic methodology and class analysis, has rapidly become famous as well for his Pacifica Network Radio program, Economic Update, heard weekly in New York and the S.F. Bay Area. This has led to his frequent public lectures drawing sold-out audiences coast to coast.

The U.S. is sinking ever deeper into hard times for the vast majority of its population. More economic downturns are coming. Capitalism's instability, inequalities, and failures to meet our needs are provoking rising opposition. Considering the increasing problems of drought, poverty, debts, job conditions, and a worsening environment, the American dream is now entirely out of reach. Our political leaders are controlled by corporate giants and lobbies that defy anything like democracy. The time is now for real and substantial change. Richard Wolff has positive suggestions.

Professor of Economics Emeritus at the University of Massachusetts, Wolff is currently a Visiting Professor in the Graduate Program in International Affairs at the New School in New York City. He also teaches classes regularly at the Brecht Forum in Manhattan. Earlier he taught economics at Yale University, at CCNY, and at the University of Paris in France.

Presented by KPFA Radio 94.1FM

Hosted by Sabrina Jacobs is the volunteer host and producer of A Rude Awakening, a cultural and political affairs show aired on KPFA. Prior to her own show, she got her start as an intern six years ago and moved on to news reporting.

Advance tickets: $12: T: 800-838-3006 or Pegasus (3 sites), Books Inc/Berkeley, Moe's, Walden Pond Bookstore, Diesel a Bookstore, Mrs. Dalloway's, S.F. - Modern Times. $15 door, KPFA benefit kpfa.org/events

Presented by KPFA Radio 94.1 FM.

$12 advance, $15 door.

Lyrical Nitrate (Peter Delpeut Netherlands, 1990) with Lecture

Wednesday, February 10th, 2016 - Wednesday, February 10th, 2016, 3:10PM

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

Special admission applies. See site for details.

Lecture/Screening class (3 hours)
Lecture with BAMPFA Senior curator, Susan Oxtoby.

This compilation of rare film fragments dating from 1905 to 1915 is a paean to the subtle colors and shimmering luminescence of tinted nitrate stock, celebrating the aesthetic possibilities of a famously fragile and fleeting medium. This is an emotional approach to film history, an investigation of mood that is only enhanced by traces of decay and disintegration. In a period often associated with “slapstick and honky-tonk,” as director Peter Delpeut says, he seeks “the melodrama, the romance, the lyricism.” His obvious pleasure in the early filmmakers’ mastery of mise-en-scène, color and lighting, acting and gesticulation is infectious, intimate, and inviting: like the best of film historians, he asks us to take this old film material anew. The soundtrack is taken from old recordings, ranging from Caruso to the thin but insistent sounds of a glass harmonica.

Part of the In Focus: The Role of Film Archives series at the BAMPFA.

Free gallery admission with same-day film ticket!


First Cousin Once Removed (Alan Berliner United States, 2013) with Les Blank Lecture

Wednesday, February 10th, 2016 - Wednesday, February 10th, 2016, 7PM

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

With Les Blank Lecture by Alan Berliner!

Preceded by:
EVERYWHERE AT ONCE (Alan Berliner, US, 1985).
A musical montage. (10 mins, Color/B&W, 16mm, From MoMA Circulating Film)

A masterful editor, Alan Berliner draws on his extensive library of images, sounds, and ephemera for films that focus on his family as a means to excavate the past and explore memory. As our first Les Blank Lecturer, Berliner will discuss his creative process before screening an early short and his most recent film, a portrait of his cousin and mentor, Edwin Honig. A renowned poet and translator, Honig suffered from Alzheimer’s disease but remained a poet to the end, playing with words and rhythm in his conversations, even as he lost command of language.

Part of the Documentary Voices 2016 series at the BAMPFA.

Free gallery admission with same-day film ticket!

Stu Allen & Mars Hotel

Wednesday, February 10th, 2016 - Wednesday, February 10th, 2016, 8:00pm

Ashkenaz
1317 San Pablo Ave., Berkeley CA 94702

In Berkeley

Tickets: $13

Stu Allen
A tradition started back in the 20th century, Ashkenaz’s Grateful Dead Night is always evolving, reaching new heights since Stu Allen & Mars Hotel launched a weekly residency in late 2011. Led by acclaimed guitarist-singer Allen (of Phil Lesh & Friends, Melvin Seals & JGB, Ghosts of Electricity), a revolving cast of incredibly talented musicians inhabits Mars Hotel, drawing from the Grateful Dead’s vast catalog to delight Deadheads and dancers of all generations. A Mars Hotel show is always an energetic evening of good vibes, good music, and good community.

When it became apparent that Jerry Garcia had played his final show in 1995, Stu Allen began working to keep Garcia’s music, sound, and spirit alive in the concert setting. He regularly works with Phil Lesh and has also played sets with Bob Weir and Bill Kreutzmann. Allen is perhaps most known for fronting Melvin Seals’ tribute to the Jerry Garcia Band from 2004 to 2011. He received more national acclaim in 2010 when he toured with Dark Star Orchestra. Allen shares the Grateful Dead’s commitment to making each performance a unique event, from preparation to execution. He will perform multiple shows before playing the same song twice, and even then, that song will not be realized in quite the same way.

Mars Hotel takes this idea a step further by presenting a new band at each performance. Drawing from the rich music scene of the Bay Area, Allen has assembled a broad and ever-rotating group of musicians that makes each concert a once-only experience. As far as Grateful Dead tribute bands go, this is a concept that has never been done before.

Black Girl (Ousmane Sembene, Senegal, 1966)

Thursday, February 11th, 2016 - Thursday, February 11th, 2016, 7PM

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

Considered Africa’s first dramatic feature film, Black Girl won Sembène the 1966 Jean Vigo Prize at Cannes. It addresses lingering racism in postcolonial Africa in a visual style reminiscent of the French New Wave. Based on Sembène’s novel Voltäique, the film tells of the exile and despair of a Senegalese domestic servant, Diouana (Mbissine Thérèse Diop), who is taken to the French Riviera by her French employers. “Brimming with tragic wisdom and latent meaning, with finality and promise, with humor and pain . . . It is at this point that African cinema begins” (Jonathan Rosenbaum, Chicago Reader).

Part of the African Film Festival 2016 at the BAMPFA.

Free gallery admission with same-day film ticket!

Roosevelt Dime plus Backbones

Thursday, February 11th, 2016 - Thursday, February 11th, 2016, 8:00pm

Ashkenaz
1317 San Pablo Ave., Berkeley CA 94702

In Berkeley

Tickets: $16/$13 advance

Roosevelt Dime
Seamlessly combining the feel-good groove of classic Rhythm and Blues with acoustic Americana instrumentation, Roosevelt Dime has crafted an infectious style and sound truly their own. Eben Pariser fronts the band with searingly soulful vocals, belted and whispered with a passion and panache straight from the juke joints. Andrew Green’s innovative piano-inspired banjo style, equal parts boogie woogie and bluegrass, lock in with the New Orleans clave rhythms of Tony Montalbano’s drums and Craig Akin’s syncopated upright bass. The swampy chords and swinging blues lines of Eben’s semi-hollow electric guitar thicken the sound further still. Armed with original songs of hope, love, and conviction that sound birthed from the cradle of American music yet still crucially relevant to the times in which we live, the group has attracted rowdy revelers on the streets of NYC, captivated serious listeners in quiet clubs, and moved ecstatic dancers at the festival grounds on their current nationwide tour. Roosevelt Dime’s jubilant performances are a “perpetual crowd pleaser” (NY Times) in any setting.

Housemaids (Gabriel Mascaro, Brazil, 2013)

Thursday, February 11th, 2016 - Thursday, February 11th, 2016, 8:30PM

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

Seven Brazilian teenagers from diverse backgrounds film their housemaids in this provocative work on race and class, an update to Black Girl. “Housemaids is humorous and sensitive, whilst also managing to be a profound work of denunciation . . . This is a rare example of recent Brazilian cinema that is capable of unsettling the very core of anyone who sees it” (Folha de São Paulo). Director Mascaro’s assemblage of the teens' home movies profiles the maids’ everyday work as well as their intimate reflections, “uncovering a dynamic that goes back to the times of slavery and provides us with a glimpse into the evolution of Brazilian society” (IDFA).

Part of the African Film Festival 2016 at the BAMPFA.

Free gallery admission with same-day film ticket!

Edmund Campion on Iannis Xenakis’s Architectural Sketches and Musical Scores

Friday, February 12th, 2016 - Friday, February 12th, 2016, 12:15pm-1pm

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

Edmund Campion, professor of music composition and director of the Center for New Music and Audio Technologies at UC Berkeley, studied in Paris, where he became deeply familiar with the music of Iannis Xenakis. One of the most important postwar avant-garde composers, known for his pioneering application of mathematical models such as set theory to musical composition, Xenakis was also an architect-engineer who worked in the office of Le Corbusier.

Part of the Perspectives on the Architecture of Life series at the BAMPFA.

Lunchtime talks are included with BAMPFA admission.

Itamar Borochov

Friday, February 12th, 2016, 8:00

California Jazz Conservatory
2087 Addison St.

In Berkeley

The world-renowned trumpeter and composer Itamar Borochov brings his unique sound to the CJC stage. Currently based in New York, Borochov does not shy away from his Bukharian heritage, incorporating Arabic modes with quarter tone intervals. The Jerusalem Post describes him as “a rising star in today’s jazz music world. Immersed in the jazz tradition, his search for his roots and identity have resulted in an evolving love for Arab and Pan-African musical sensibilities - a natural palette for a trumpeter-composer raised in Jaffa, an integrated Muslim-Jewish-Christian city.” The Midwest Record says that “this is grandly innovative stuff that isn’t envelope-pushing just for the sake of it. This is a young lion to pay attention to.” itamarborochov.com

Short Bio
Fascinated as a youngster by Clark Terry and Booker Little, Itamar’s continued thirst for knowledge soon brought him to the attention of Curtis Fuller and Dr Billy Taylor, in whose groups he performed. Before long, Itamar established his own voice, successfully creating a bridge between past and present, blending the timeless music of ancient lands with jazz, America’s greatest ​cultural treasure.​ Following his move to the USA from Israel, Borochov quickly established himself on the American jazz scene. His debut album, Outset, was chosen by the New York City Jazz Record as one of the best albums of 2014.

The Forbidden Room (Guy Maddin, Canada, 2015)

Friday, February 12th, 2016 - Friday, February 12th, 2016, 8:15PM

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

Filmmaker in person!

Five years in the making, The Forbidden Room is a masterful and mischievous ode to cinema. Guy Maddin and codirector Evan Johnson researched the terrain of lost cinema, using it as the inspiration for their narrative, an epic phantasmagoria where parenthetical stories are nested within stories, running the gamut from tales of amnesia, captivity, deception, and murder to skeleton women and vampire bananas. Wild and relentless, the creative energy of this work is exceptional. Featuring an international cast—Mathieu Amalric, Udo Kier, Charlotte Rampling, Geraldine Chaplin, and Jacques Nolot, among others—the film re-creates the look of now long-obsolete film stocks.

Part of the Cinema Mon Amour: Guy Maddin series at the BAMPFA.

Free gallery admission with same-day film ticket!

Desire Caught by the Tail

Friday, February 12th, 2016 - Saturday, February 20th, 2016, Fri & Sat, February 12th, 13th, 19th, 20th, 7-10pm

Lottie Rose Artist House
6117 San Pablo Ave

In Oakland

Come join us as the Lottie Rose Art house is transformed into the mad world of Pablo Picasso's first play: 'Desire, Caught by the Tail' a piece about color, sex, winning, potatoes and anguish. Begin your evening adding your swatch of color to a community canvas in revelry with local artists' visual work, as live music slowly slips into the meat of the night. At 8pm, the stage is revealed for an exciting one hour engagement of the senses that will whisk you into a strange yet familiar world.

Directed and produced by Fenner, the piece engages over twenty artists from all over Oakland as well as members of the Lottie Rose House.
Cast:
Big foot: John Paul Olsen
Tart: Sango Tajima
Round End: Melissa Carter
Cousin: Puja Tolton
Onion: Davern Wright
The Anguishes
Colin Hurley
Heather Fairweather
Michael Hussey
CURTAINS:
Lelia Johnson
Mary Matabor
Danielle Alojado
Tal Etedgi
Feast your eyes on work by visual artists, Eric Bohr, Kaitlin McSweeney, Colin Hurley, Tom Franco and more. Pre-show music with Josh Mellinger, and sound design by Andy Falkner Taylor Gersbach and Benji Marx. Shadow projector set design by Kate Fitt and Sara Petta. Props by Andy Faulkner. Potatoes cooked by members of 'The Sweet Bones'

It is the Next Big Thing after Fenner toured across the country with The Agile Rascal's Bike Theatre ensemble written piece, 'Sunlight on the Brink.' An Associate Artist at Ragged Wing Ensemble, and frequent face at The Flight Deck in Oakland, Fenner is excited to be at the helm of this wild project.

Gallery/doors open at 7pm, Performance at 8pm, stay for dancing until ! ! ! Art Show and Performance is FREE and appropriate for mature children and all kids at heart. Come be engaged by the actualization of this absurdist romp! Donations encouraged. Food and drink available with donation

Presented by Firehouse Art Collective.

1-100$.

Pio Pico: The Last Governor of Mexican California

Saturday, February 13th, 2016 - Saturday, February 13th, 2016, 2/13/16, 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

African American Museum & Library
659 14th Street

In Oakland

CALIFORNIA'S BLACK, NATIVE & MEXICAN GOVERNOR
El gobernador africano, indigena, y mexicano de CA

Carlos Salomon, Fruitvale resident and Director of the Latin American Studies Program at Cal State East Bay, will give a special talk about his book Pio Pico: the Last Mexican Governor of California. Pico fought to maintain influence after the Mexican-American war of 1846-48, and was of mixed heritage: Black, Native American, and Spanish.

Carlos Salomon, residente de Fruitvale y director del programa de estudios latinoamericanos en la Universidad Cal State East Bay, hablara sobre su libro: Pio Pico: el ultimo gobernador de California mejicana. Pico fue gobernador antes de la guerra entre Mejico y los E.E.U.U. 1846-48, y era de herencia mezclada africana, indigena, y espanola. 1846-48, and was of mixed heritage: Black, Native American, and Spanish.

Presented by African American Museum & Library.

Free

Jazz Art Workshop

Saturday, February 13th, 2016 - Saturday, February 13th, 2016, 2:30 - 4:00 pm

Richmond Art Center
2540 Barrett Ave.

In Richmond

Listen to acclaimed musicians and let their music inspire you to make art. This hands-on art-making event is perfect for everyone in your family to get in the groove and express themselves by drawing, painting and collaging. Materials are provided by the Art Center, but feel free to bring your own. All ages. Children under 12 must be accompanied by an adult. RSVP appreciated for groups larger than six by calling 510.620.6772.

Modern Times (Charlie Chaplin United States, 1936)

Saturday, February 13th, 2016 - Saturday, February 13th, 2016, 3:30PM

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

It starts with an overhead shot of sheep, cuts to the throngs coming out of a subway station. Was Chaplin a Surrealist, or just a realist? His version of modern times looks forward in equal measure to Jacques Tati and 1984. This “silent” is full of modern sounds, heard over loudspeakers and big corporate television screens (not to mention the Tramp’s outburst of French-inspired gibberish). Charlie the ever-elegant Tramp is an industrial swashbuckler with an oilcan for a sword, but he’s begun taking on the characteristics of factory machines, obsessively twisting buttons no matter where they are. We can’t have this antisocial behavior, can we? Charlie’s eventually arrested as a Communist. Paulette Goddard as a starving gamine becomes his comrade in loving arms against an overmechanized world. Only Chaplin could both satirize their kitschy dreams and have them walk off into the sunset in the most poignant Depression image ever faked.

Part of the Movie Matinees for All Ages series at the BAMPFA.

Free gallery admission with same-day film ticket!

Sylvester: New Year's Eve (Lupu Pick Germany, 1923)

Saturday, February 13th, 2016 - Saturday, February 13th, 2016, 6PM

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

Introduced by Guy Maddin.

A rare treasure by auteur scenarist Carl Mayer, Sylvester experiments with the subjective visual motifs he would perfect in The Last Laugh. The inability to “understand one another’s speech,” as cited in a Tower of Babel quotation, is conveyed purely in expressions and gestures, without intertitles. A pub owner (the hulking, childlike type perfected by Emil Jannings and reprised in Fassbinder’s films) is caught in the intense rivalry between his possessive mother and his long-suffering wife. It is New Year’s Eve; in the last hour of the old year, the bitter feelings intensify, and an incredible real-time drama ends in tragedy at midnight.

Preceded by:
STREET OF CROCODILES (Quay Brothers, UK, 1986).
“The most sublime piece of frame-by-frame filmmaking yet accomplished.”—Michael Atkinson, Village Voice
(Based on a short story by Bruno Schulz, 22 mins, Color, Blu-ray, From Zeitgeist Films)

Part of the Cinema Mon Amour: Guy Maddin series at the BAMPFA.

Free gallery admission with same-day film ticket!

My Winnipeg (Guy Maddin Canada, 2007)

Saturday, February 13th, 2016 - Saturday, February 13th, 2016, 8:15PM

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

Filmmaker in person!

Preceded by:
THE HEART OF THE WORLD (Guy Maddin, Canada, 2000).
This furiously edited, breathless parody of silent Russian cinema is a tribute to the very heart of the world: KINO!
(6 mins, B&W, 35mm, From Zeitgeist Films)

Winnipeg filmmaker Guy Maddin yearns for escape, but the icebound burg holds him fast. Dozing aboard a train that endlessly loops the city limits, he only rises to sleepwalk back to his boyhood home, where he reenacts scenes from his childhood. In this dreamy milieu, the Manitoban town’s history comes to life, rife with supernatural portents in old Indian legends and twentieth-century tales of ghosts and mediums. Maddin’s first foray into nonfiction filmmaking further spins the autobiographical melodramatic skein of Cowards Bend the Knee (2003) and Brand upon the Brain! (2007).

Part of the Cinema Mon Amour: Guy Maddin series at the BAMPFA.

Free gallery admission with same-day film ticket!

Los Boleros

Saturday, February 13th, 2016 - Saturday, February 13th, 2016, 8:30pm

Ashkenaz
1317 San Pablo Ave., Berkeley CA 94702

In Berkeley

Tickets: $15/$10 students

Cuban Salsa dance lesson
Los Boleros
Staying true to the traditional styles of an era when Cuban roots music was golden, Los Boleros play and sing classic Cuban son montuno, traditional salsa, merengue, cumbia, bolero, vals, and danzon. “Imagine going back in time to Ricky Ricardo’s Tropicana Havana, then take a ride to the Buena Vista Social Club,” the band says. In addition to concerts, dances, and festivals, Los Boleros has played more than 100 weddings. Started as a coffeehouse duo by Rudy Furlan (author of “The Cuban Tres Chord and Scale Book”), Los Boleros features lead singers Felix Samuel, a native of Havana, and Zareen, along with Furlan on tres, tenor saxophonist David Somers, bassist Anthony Garcia, and percussionists Dominic Cabrera on congas and Edgar Lavado on bongos. Famous in Havana, Felix Samuel was also an actor in the recent HBO movie “Hemingway and Gelhorn.”

Loulou (Maurice Pialat France, 1980)

Sunday, February 14th, 2016 - Saturday, February 27th, 2016, 02/14 at 7PM, 02/27 at 8:30PM

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

In a crowded nightclub, Nelly (Isabelle Huppert), bourgeois-bred and married to an advertising executive, is taking her passions out for air. She finds herself dancing with a happy, drunken lout, leaves with him, and stays with him. Maurice Pialat, consummate director of character, explores a woman's multifarious desires for sexual liberation in Loulou. (The film is drawn from the life of the screenwriter Arlette Langmann.) Though the title carries the name of Gérard Depardieu's leather-jacketed lothario Loulou, it is as object, not subject. Depardieu graciously plays along, before our eyes calibrating his outsized, undereducated, hypersexual character to Huppert/Nelly's perception of him. Nelly and Loulou make stabs at normal living—she continues to work for her husband, they play their part in a typically animated Pialat family gathering. But when they walk off into the night at film's end, it's not forever after, but until desire is played out.

Sunday, February 14th at 7pm
Saturday, February 27th at 8:30pm

Part of the Love Exists: The Films of Maurice Pialat series at the BAMPFA.

Free gallery admission with same-day film ticket!

“Soggy Sundays” Kids’ Series: Family Square Dance with More Pretty Girls Than One and caller Robin Fischer

Sunday, February 14th, 2016 - Sunday, February 14th, 2016, 3:00 – 4:30 pm

Ashkenaz
1317 San Pablo Ave., Berkeley CA 94702

In Berkeley

Tickets: $6 kids/$8 adults

Robin Fischer
Robin Fischer is a founding member and fiddler in the Bearcat Stringband and the Drifter Sisters as well as a teacher at Berkeley’s Manning Music. She has recently become passionate about calling dances and has appeared at the North Oakland square dance.

Dracula: Pages from a Virgin's Diary (Guy Maddin Canada, 2002)

Sunday, February 14th, 2016 - Sunday, February 14th, 2016, 3PM

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

Filmmaker in person!

Preceded by:
LIGHT IS CALLING (Bill Morrison, US, 2004).
“Bodies and movements dissolve in swirling waves of golden light, the film’s decay radiating as a glorious self-immolation.”—Maximilian Le Cain, Senses of Cinema
(8 mins, Color, 35mm, From Icarus Films)

“Immigrants!! Others! From the East!” Characteristically hysterical intertitles herald Maddin’s envisioning of Bram Stoker’s tale, performed by the Royal Winnipeg Ballet. This Dracula is both deliriously silly and earnestly beautiful, highly idiosyncratic yet, with its squeamish sexuality and unsubtle overtones of xenophobia, oddly faithful to the original book. The dance sequences are often tongue-in-cheek (pirouetting maids garlanded in garlic), yet they can be surprisingly effective at conveying narrative and character—the extravagantly stylized gestures of silent melodrama seem to come naturally to the dancers. Mostly black-and- white and silent, with a swelling Mahler score, the film is punctuated with strategic flashes of color and sound effects.

Part of the Cinema Mon Amour: Guy Maddin series at the BAMPFA.

Free gallery admission with same-day film ticket!

My Funny Valentine/Flauti Diversi

Sunday, February 14th, 2016, 4:30 PM

California Jazz Conservatory
2087 Addison St.

In Berkeley

Flauti Diversi presents a crossover potpourri of medieval, renaissance, Arabic, Sephardic, klezmer, jazz style arrangements and improvisations to put you in a romantic mood. Featuring Karen Clark on contralto, Frances Feldon on recorders/transverse flutes, Peter Maund on percussion, Sarah Michael on the qanun and Susanna Porte on violoncello.

Short Bio
Flauti Diversi has been presenting early/contemporary chamber music programs for over twenty years. Musical Director Frances Feldon and the group present their third program at the CJC, and the second in which a variety of crossover styles are featured. tackk.com/lgz9d6

Dishonored (Josef Von Sternberg United States, 1931)

Sunday, February 14th, 2016 - Sunday, February 14th, 2016, 5PM

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

Introduced by Guy Maddin.

In one of his funniest films, Sternberg cast Marlene Dietrich as an Austrian spy and reinvented World War I as a masquerade. Espionage is merely an excuse for Dietrich’s intrepid Agent X-27 to attend a brilliantly choreo- graphed ball in giant feathered helmet and metallic mini-cape, fly off to the front in a taut leather jumpsuit accompanied by her black pussycat, or pose as a pasty, thick-waisted Russian maid enveloping the enemy in her voluminous skirts. As the Marlenes multiply, X-27’s adversary and lover Victor McLaglen expresses the net effect: “the more you cheat and the more you lie, the more exciting you become.”

Part of the Cinema Mon Amour: Guy Maddin series at the BAMPFA.

Free gallery admission with same-day film ticket!

Nyabinghi Night

Sunday, February 14th, 2016 - Sunday, February 14th, 2016, 8:30pm

Ashkenaz
1317 San Pablo Ave., Berkeley CA 94702

In Berkeley

Nyabinghi Night
The Nyabinghi Drummers trace the greatest reggae musicians’ spiritual roots to Rastafarianism, playing the beats and chants at the heart of the religion as well as forming the foundation for later reggae in Jamaica. They help set up the deepest feelings for tonight’s celebration. The drummers have been featured at various Ashkenaz reggae events including Peter Tosh’s birthday celebrations. Tonight they headline. According to Sister Irie, the first Nyabinghi drummers were women in Uganda, in their struggle against German colonists a century ago. In Jamaica in the 1950s it became part of the Rastafarian culture, a day in the hills of food, dancing, drumming and chanting, used to honor holy days. The music, the religion, the culture and politics of Rastafarianism evolved into Jamaican reggae. But tonight’s performers dig back into the real roots.

FRICTION STRING QUARTET IN BERKELEY ON FEB. 16

Tuesday, February 16th, 2016 - Tuesday, February 16th, 2016, 8:00 pm

Berkeley City Club
2315 Durant Ave

In Berkeley


Berkeley Chamber Performances continues its 23rd season of intimate chamber concerts with the FRICTION STRING QUARTET, “a high-octane music-making “ ensemble, “with tonal flair,” as the SF Chronicle puts it, on Tuesday, February 16, at 8 p.m. at the Berkeley City Club. The program features the music of Beethoven, Britten, and Andy Akiho. Audience members are invited to attend a complementary wine and cheese reception following the concert with an opportunity to meet and talk with the musicians.
FRICTION STRING QUARTET, in residence with San Francisco Friends of Chamber Music, and known for it’s exhilarating performances of new works as well as the great masterpieces, was formed in 2011. Taking risks to enlarge the understanding of what a string quartet can be, FRICTION sometimes uses percussion , amplification, movement, dance ,and film without losing sight of the quartet’s essence: nuanced interaction of the four voices. The members of the quartet, gifted ,young musicians who attended the San Francisco Conservatory ,are: Keven Rogers and Otis Harriel, violins; Taija Warbelow, viola; and Doug Machiz, cello.
The program begins with Beethoven’s String Quartet Op. 59, No. 1, the first of the three quartets dedicated to the Russian Count Rasumosvky. Beethoven’s 1806 work will be be followed by String Quartet No.1 by Andy Akiho, the young New York based composer who won the 2015 Lili Boulanger Memorial Fund. The program concludes with Benjamin Britten’s String Quartet No. 2, Op. 36 , both a tribute to Henry Purcell and a reference to the opera Peter Grimes.
Berkeley Chamber Performances presents a range of musical styles, from early music of the 16th and 17th centuries to modern and contemporary works. Performed in an intimate setting, the concerts are held in the Ballroom of the historic Berkeley City Club.

BluesBox Bayou Band

Tuesday, February 16th, 2016 - Tuesday, February 16th, 2016, 8:00pm

Ashkenaz
1317 San Pablo Ave., Berkeley CA 94702

In Berkeley

Tickets: $12

Cajun/Zydeco dance lesson
BluesBox Bayou Band
The BluesBox Bayou Band adds swamp beat boogie and blues to Louisiana dance grooves to create its own Americana/Cajun/zydeco sound. Based in Sonora, the BBBB has built its chops and fan base over more than 15 years of performing, including gigs at fundraisers and festivals from the Sacramento Jazz Jubilee to the Gilroy Garlic Festival and the Isleton Crawdad Festival. Singer and accordionist Pete (PD) Grimaldi formed the band in 1996 after a stint as a promoter of shows in hometown Modesto by acts from Queen Ida and Buckwheat Zydeco to Tom Rigney. That exposure to music from Louisiana and beyond inspired Grimaldi to pick up the squeezebox himself and put his own spin on “roots music.” The current BBBB also features Pete’s brother Frank Grimaldi on lead guitar, bassist and singer Julie Johnson, and a rotating cast of friends including drummer Peter DeMattos and rubboard player Deb Krilanovich.

Gilda (Charles Vidor United States, 1946) with Lecture

Wednesday, February 17th, 2016 - Wednesday, February 17th, 2016, 3:10PM

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

Special admission applies, see site for details.

Lecture/Screening class (3 hours)
Lecture with Grover Crisp Executive, Vice President of Sony Pictures Entertainment.

Gilda is perhaps the most polished of film noirs; the lacquered camerawork of cinematographer Rudolph Maté seems to fix forever this vision of a world permeated by corruption and cynicism—a vision so thorough that it almost transcends the bounds of the genre. These jaundiced elements converge on the figure of Gilda (Rita Hayworth), caught in a triangle between her tycoon/casino-owner husband (George Macready) and her ex-lover (Glenn Ford). Her sultry rendition of “Put the Blame on Mame,” while nightclub patrons’ hands reach out for her in the dark, just about says it all, where no one gets anything—even love—for nothing.

Part of In Focus: The Role of Film Archives at the BAMPFA.

Free gallery admission with same-day film ticket!

Maidan (Sergei Loznitsa Netherlands, 2014)

Wednesday, February 17th, 2016 - Wednesday, February 17th, 2016, 7PM

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

Introduced by Jeffrey Skoller.

Structured solely through extended fixed shots filmed over a period of three months, this account of the riots in Kiev’s Maidan Square, which led to the ouster of Ukraine’s pro-Russian President Viktor Yanukovych, tracks with formalist rigor the trajectory from peaceful protest to violent confrontation. By placing the viewer in the midst of the masses without the guideposts of expert commentary or central personalities, Maidan provides an immersive experience and a bracing, timeless portrait of protest and revolution.

Part of the Documentary Voices 2016 series at the BAMPFA.

Free gallery admission with same-day film ticket.

Stu Allen & Mars Hotel

Wednesday, February 17th, 2016 - Wednesday, February 17th, 2016, 8:00pm

Ashkenaz
1317 San Pablo Ave., Berkeley CA 94702

In Berkeley

$13

Stu Allen
A tradition started back in the 20th century, Ashkenaz’s Grateful Dead Night is always evolving, reaching new heights since Stu Allen & Mars Hotel launched a weekly residency in late 2011. Led by acclaimed guitarist-singer Allen (of Phil Lesh & Friends, Melvin Seals & JGB, Ghosts of Electricity), a revolving cast of incredibly talented musicians inhabits Mars Hotel, drawing from the Grateful Dead’s vast catalog to delight Deadheads and dancers of all generations. A Mars Hotel show is always an energetic evening of good vibes, good music, and good community.

When it became apparent that Jerry Garcia had played his final show in 1995, Stu Allen began working to keep Garcia’s music, sound, and spirit alive in the concert setting. He regularly works with Phil Lesh and has also played sets with Bob Weir and Bill Kreutzmann. Allen is perhaps most known for fronting Melvin Seals’ tribute to the Jerry Garcia Band from 2004 to 2011. He received more national acclaim in 2010 when he toured with Dark Star Orchestra. Allen shares the Grateful Dead’s commitment to making each performance a unique event, from preparation to execution. He will perform multiple shows before playing the same song twice, and even then, that song will not be realized in quite the same way.

Mars Hotel takes this idea a step further by presenting a new band at each performance. Drawing from the rich music scene of the Bay Area, Allen has assembled a broad and ever-rotating group of musicians that makes each concert a once-only experience. As far as Grateful Dead tribute bands go, this is a concept that has never been done before.

Jules Kliot with Erin Algeo: Lace in Architecture of Life

Thursday, February 18th, 2016 - Thursday, February 18th, 2016, 12:15pm-1pm

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

Join Jules Kliot, founder and director of Berkeley’s Lacis Museum of Lace and Textiles, for a presentation in the galleries on the significance of this ethereal fabric as part of the structure of human achievement. Kliot and Lacis manager and curator Erin Algeo will share examples from the Lacis Museum collection in addition to illuminating the works on view in Architecture of Life.

“It all begins in the mid-fifteenth century at the heart of the Renaissance in Italy, where this fascinating period in needlework represented a significant advancement in civilization in an age of enlightenment. Man was now important and ornamentation and the decorative arts would blossom. He was encouraged to seek new vistas in his view of the world, to experiment, to develop new technologies and accept the enduring challenge to do his best . . . and he reached unfathomed heights of perfection in all he touched.”—Jules Kliot

Part of the Architecture of Life series at the BAMPFA.

Gallery talks are included with BAMPFA admission.

Angela Davis and Johanna present Mumia Abu-Jamal's Writing on the Wall

Thursday, February 18th, 2016 - Thursday, February 18th, 2016, 2/18/16, 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM

First Congregational Church of Oakland
2501 Harrison St

In Oakland

KPFA Radio 94.1FM and City Lights Books present:
Mumia Abu-Jamal's Writings, with Angela Davis
Writing on the Wall: Selected Prison Letters
Hosted by Angela Davis, Johanna Fernandez and Walter Turner

"Mumia Abu-Jamal is one of the most important public intellectuals of our time...He offers us new ways of thinking about law, democracy and power. He allows us to reflect upon the fact that transformational possibilities often emerge where we least expect them."
-Angela Davis

"Revolutionary love, revolutionary memory and revolutionary analysis are at work on every page written by Mumia Abu-Jamal...His writings are a wake-up call. He is a voice from our prophetic tradition, speaking to us here, now, livingly, urgently. Black man, old-school jazz man, freedom fighter, revolutionary-his presence, his voice, his words are the writing on the wall." -Cornel West

Writing on the Wall presents a selection of more than 100 previously unpublished essays spanning the entire period of Mumia Abu-Jamal's incarceration that crystallize his essential perspectives on community, politics, protest, history, social change and movement organizing in the U.S. and internationally. From discussions of Rosa Parks and Trayvon Martin, to Martin Luther King and Edward Snowden, Abu-Jamal articulates lucid, humorous, and often prescient insight into the past, present and future of American politics and society.

Johanna Fernandez, the editor of Writing on the Wall, is writer and producer of the film Justice on Trial: The Case for Mumia Abu-Jamal.

Professor Walter Turner, College of Marin Social Sciences Professor, is host and producer of the weekly Pacifica Radio program Africa Today, airing Monday evenings on KPFA Radio 94.1FM.

Advance tickets: $12: 800-838-3006 or Marcus Books, Pegasus (3 shops), Books Inc/Berkeley, Moe's, Walden Pond Bookstore, Diesel a Bookstore, Mrs. Dalloway's, SF: City Lights Bookstore, Modern Times. $15 door, KPFA benefit, information: kpfa.org/events

Presented by KPFA Radio 94.1 FM.

$12 advance, $15 door.

The Art of Africa: Short Films

Thursday, February 18th, 2016 - Thursday, February 18th, 2016, 7PM

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

These three shorts profile new artists and movements making waves in Africa today. Drawn from a short documentary series produced by the Swedish collective Stocktown, Afripedia: Kenya takes an intimate look at Nairobi’s lively urban culture scene, with interviews with 3D artist Andrew Kaggia and the Afro-futurist Just a Band. Afripedia: Ghana heads to the capital Accra, already whispered about as “the next big thing,” to introduce us to the androgynous music star Wiyaala and the visual artist Afrogallonism. The Prophecy goes behind the scenes of photographer Fabrice Monteiro’s sweeping project on the environment in Senegal.

AFRIPEDIA: KENYA Teddy Goitom, Benjamin Taft, Senay Berhe, Kenya/Ghana/Sweden, 2015, 28 mins, Color, Blu-Ray

AFRIPEDIA: GHANA Teddy Goitom, Benjamin Taft, Senay Berhe, Kenya/Ghana/Sweden, 2015, 28 mins, Color, Blu-Ray

THE PROPHECY Marcia Juzga, Senegal, 2015, 20 mins, Color, Blu-Ray


Part of the African Film Festival 2016 at the BAMPFA.

Free gallery admission with same-day film ticket!

Film Night-Jam; "A Real PURPOSE" Film and Music night; Live music Jordan Feinstein & the Real PURPOSE Band featuring members of ARP Band

Thursday, February 18th, 2016 - Thursday, February 18th, 2016, Film at 8:30; Live Music at 10:10

Ashkenaz
1307 San Pablo Ave.

In Berkeley

Tickets: $10

Tonight is a celebration of the completion of “A Real Purpose: The Story of JAHM,” producer Joe Baker’s 87-minute film about an extraordinary concert journey, that includes a concert with musicians featured in the film. In October, 2012, filmmaker Joe Baker took a group of American musicians and a film crew (Jared S. Johnson and Kevin Young) to Jamaica and Haiti, where they spent time with some of the greatest musicians on those islands – including Earl “Chinna” Smith, Empress Apple, and Prezident Brown – creating new music collaboratively. By the end of the trip, more than 40 musicians had participated: JHAM stands for Jamaican Haitian American Musicians jamming for education.

This special event was created by Baker and volunteers as a fundraiser for two beneficiaries: Pineapple Community Education Association in Ocho Rios, Jamaica, and Mission of Hope in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. The CD/DVD of the film and music from the trip will be available in the near future and will also raise money for the beneficiaries.

Tonight Ashkenaz turns its stage and screen over to an extraordinary experience of musical collaborations rooted in reggae and cultural exchange as Baker presents the full screening “A Real Purpose: The Story of JHAM,” plus three music videos from its predecessor, “The Africa Project.” They are followed by a live concert/dance with an all-star JHAM band of some of the musicians featured in the film playing reggae dance music, including songs from the film as well as band originals. The project is a sequel to Baker’s acclaimed 2010 “The Africa Project,” a DVD/CD of a similar collaboration between African and American musicians that was staged as a film and concert at Ashkenaz two years ago.

A Nos Amours (Maurice Pialat France, 1983)

Friday, February 19th, 2016 - Friday, March 25th, 2016, 02/19 at 8:15PM, 03/25 at 6:30PM

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

It opens on a rehearsal of summer-camp theatrics, but Marjorie Morningstar this is not. Seventeen-year-old Suzanne (the incomparable Sandrine Bonnaire, in her first film) rehearses nothing in life, driven by the power her impetuousness holds over others. In this, she is very like the film's director. At home in Paris, Suzanne is the eye of the family storm, her sexuality ratcheting up the suppressed passions of her narcissistic brother and insecure mother, and sending her father (played by Pialat) out of the house. Suzanne alone knows that her joyless promiscuity is a cry for help she is too smart to accept. Attuned to Bonnaire's subtle messages, the film simmers, then erupts, twice, in Fassbinderian family fisticuffs—once, legend has it, to the surprise even of the cast as the prodigal father returns unexpectedly, lending the film not the patina of truth, but its essence, the triumph of Pialat's approach.

Friday, February 19th at 8:15pm
Friday, March 25th at 6:30pm

Part of the Love Exists: The Films of Maurice Pialat series at the BAMPFA.

Free gallery admission with same-day film ticket!

Dan Feldman on Santiago Ramón y Cajal’s Drawings of Brain Structures

Friday, February 19th, 2016 - Friday, February 19th, 2016, 12:15pm-1pm

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

Dan Feldman is a faculty member in the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology at UC Berkeley and the Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute, as well as director of the Neuroscience PhD program. His laboratory studies the function of the brain’s cerebral cortex, using many imaging techniques that are the twenty-first-century equivalents of Nobel Prize–winning Spanish neuroscientist Ramón y Cajal’s pioneering drawings of neural networks.

Part of the Perspectives on the Architecture of Life series at the BAMPFA.

Lunchtime talks are included with BAMPFA admission.

Maurice Pialat: Love Exists (Anne-Marie Faux France, 2007)

Friday, February 19th, 2016, 6:30PM

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

A documentary about the life and career of Maurice Pialat produced by his widow, the accomplished film producer Sylvie Pialat. The film interweaves clips from his films with interview footage of Pialat, who speaks of growing up as an only child, his interest in painting, his early influences in cinema from Yasujiro Ozu to John Ford, his disaffection with the French New Wave, and the theme of abandonment in his films. Pialat’s remarks offer insights into his aesthetic strategies and hint at his reputation as a challenging, irascible director, known for having pushed his actors to deliver raw and powerful performances.

Part of the Love Exists: The Films of Maurice Pialat series at the BAMPFA.

Free gallery admission with same-day film ticket!

To Brasil and Bacharach: A Tribute

Friday, February 19th, 2016, 8:00

California Jazz Conservatory
2087 Addison St.

In Berkeley

Demonstrating her love for skillfully crafted songs with evocative melodies, rich harmonies, intricate rhythms and linguistic metaphor, vocalist Mary D’Orazi teams up with Brazilian pianist/composer/arranger Marcos Silva for the release of their new recording To Brasil and Bacharach: A Tribute. This performance will include several favorite Burt Bacharach/Hal David songs, plus others by Toninho Horta, Ivan Lins, Tom Jobim and more. CD's will be available for purchase. marydorazi.com

Earl Zero; Ryan The Operator; Sista Iminah

Friday, February 19th, 2016 - Friday, February 19th, 2016, 9:30pm

Ashkenaz
1317 San Pablo Ave., Berkeley CA 94702

In Berkeley

Tickets: $15 Day of Show/ $12 Advance
Earl Zero
Earl Zero continues to reign as one of the great messengers of Jah music. Zero has long influenced musicians and listeners far beyond the reggae realm. His best-known song, “None Shall Escape the Judgment,” was the basis for Jonathan Richman’s “Egyptian Reggae.” His “Please Officer” was covered by Jimmy Cliff as “Peace Officer.” Born in Kingston, Jamaica, Zero was schoolmates with guitarist Earl “Chinna” Smith, and they made amateur recordings together. In the ’70s and ’80s Zero scored his own hits at home and in England, before relocating to the U.S. He may not record as often as followers would like, but he is one of reggae’s hottest touring acts for his hard-hitting Rastafarian messages in song, balanced by love songs.

Stephen Sondheim's Company

Friday, February 19th, 2016 - Sunday, February 28th, 2016, February 19, 20, 26, 27 at 7 pm and February 21, 28 at 2 pm

Malonga Casquelourd Center for the Arts
1428 Alice Street

In Oakland

What do you do when you've got three girlfriends, all your friends are married, and it's your birthday? Manhattanite, Robert attempts to come to terms with commitment as he observes the highs and lows of his friends' marriages. Featuring such classics as "Marry Me A Little" and "Ladies Who Lunch," this sharp musical comedy is the winner of 7 TONY Awards including Best Musical, Best Score, Best Lyrics and Best Book.

Presented by YMTC - Youth Musical Theater Company.

$15-28.

Magical Zoology Collage

Saturday, February 20th, 2016 - Saturday, February 20th, 2016, 2/20/16, 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

uBe Art
2507 San Pablo Ave

In Berkeley

Creative workshop/ playshops at uBe Art!

You don't need to be a trained artist or exceptional Pictionary player to signup for workshops at uBe Art! We've designed creative workshops for the kid in you - the one who can't draw a straight line.

Artist Katie McCann will help unleash the magical creature in your creative brain. She will guide you in creating Magical Creatures using cut up magazines and vintage paper and organize into a truly magical creature of your own making.

Fun for adults and kids 10yrs and up.

Organize your pals and make it an adult friendly adventure with wine and friends.
All materials included!

Presented by uBe Art.

29.00.

Book Presentation by writer and artist LINDA NORTON

Saturday, February 20th, 2016 - Saturday, February 20th, 2016, 2/20/16, 6:00 PM - 7:30 PM

Center for History and Community
2488 Coolidge Ave

In Oakland

LINDA NORTON, writer and artist, will read from her book, THE PUBLIC GARDENS: POEMS AND HISTORY, and from new work she's made in connection with the project "Home and Away: Oakland, California Prisons, and the Geography of the Heart." She'll also give a slide presentation about photography and history on Saturday, February 20, 6-7:30 at Peralta Hacienda Historical Park's Center for History and Community, 2488 Coolidge Ave. The "Home and Away" project seeks to fill an informational (and an emotional) void by raising questions about the paradoxes of American history, ideas about freedom and equality, and the huge increase in the prison population in California in the past thirty years. Education is both a theme and a goal of the project. Norton, Peralta Hacienda ED Holly Alonso, and graphic artist Jeff Norman have developed an accompanying exhibit from oral histories and visual art created by Norton and community members in a series of residencies last summer. At the February 20 event, and beyond, visitors will be encouraged to add to the exhibit with art, commentary, questions, and poetry. Supplies provided, refreshments served.

Dialogue and Q and A will follow the presentation. The Home and Away exhibit is now showing in the site's historic house museum at 2465 34th Ave., 230-530 pm Wed through Saturday, and can be viewed before the reading on February 20.

Presented by Friends of Peralta Hacienda Historical Park.

Free

Timbuktu (Abderrahmane Sissako France, 2014)

Saturday, February 20th, 2016 - Saturday, February 20th, 2016, 6:30PM

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

The real-life fall of Timbuktu to Islamic militants in 2012 (and subsequent destruction of many of its cultural landmarks) forms the basis of this powerful fable from Abderrahmane Sissako (Waiting for Happiness, Bamako), “one of the true humanists of recent cinema” (Variety). On the outskirts of a town ruled by jihadists, a family of three lives peacefully in the dunes, but soon they too are drawn into a world where music, cigarettes, soccer, and even laughter have been banned. Timbuktu “feels at once timely and permanent, immediate, and essential” (New York Times).

Part of the African Film Festival 2016 series at the BAMPFA.

Free gallery admission with same-day film ticket!

Black History Month - Billy! Stevie! Nina!

Saturday, February 20th, 2016, 8:00

California Jazz Conservatory
2087 Addison St.

In

Pianist Tammy Hall pays tribute to three musical institutions in one night! Celebrating the genius and activism of Dr. Billy Taylor, Stevie Wonder and Nina Simone. With Ruth Davies on bass and Darian Gray on drums.

Short Bio
"Music to me is not a means to an end; it is a Gift, it is Ministry, it is my Life." - Tammy L Hall

Tammy Hall is a pianist, organist, composer, arranger and musical director. She began playing piano at the age of 4 and by age 7, she was accompanying her church choir. By age 9 she was the organist/pianist for two churches. After attending Mills College in Oakland, California, Tammy decided to pursue jazz. She has since gone on to work with many vocalists and award-winning performers, including Linda Tillery, Denise Perrier, Barbara Dane, Holly Near, Kim Nalley, Rhonda Benin, Darlene Love, Melba Moore, Connie Champagne, Kenny Washington, Pamela Rose, Queen Esther Marrow, Mary Wilson, and Etta Jones. She has also worked with bandleaders Houston Person, David 'Fathead' Newman, Ellen Seeling and the Montclair Women's Big Band and Regina Carter. tammyhall.com

Thomas Mapfumo & the Blacks Unlimited

Saturday, February 20th, 2016 - Saturday, February 20th, 2016, 9:30pm

Ashkenaz
1317 San Pablo Ave., Berkeley CA 94702

In Berkeley

Tickets: $25/$20 advance

Thomas Mapfumo
He is “The Lion of Zimbabwe.” The most important musical-political force in the struggle for self-rule in Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe) and one of the best-known artists in African music, singer-songwriter Thomas Mapfumo modified his style once Zimbabwe achieved independence, but due to increasing unrest in recent years his music has become as adamant as in the early years. Mapfumo’s electric African music is as infectious to dance to as its lyrics are intellectually challenging, and it continues to evolve as current homeland crises inspire his latest music.

While the songs are often politically pointed, the music has a lilting, hypnotic pulse that Mapfumo and his Blacks Unlimited band created in the late 1970s by transposing the Shona people’s griots’ ancient mbira (African thumb piano) to electric guitars, bass, drums, and horns. They then blended in blues and jazz elements to create “chimurenga music” (chimurenga means struggle in Shona). It was a style promoted by Mapfumo’s Hallelujah Chicken Run Band (whose recordings are available on a reissued CD collection) before he launched his own Blacks Unlimited group. Mapfumo also brought new pride to nearly discarded traditional culture by singing in the ancient Shona language.

In response to economic and political struggles in Zimbabwe, Mapfumo’s songs address issues with such lyrics as “We are slaves in our own country.” Imprisoned before Zimbabwe attained independence in 1980, Mapfumo initially rallied support for the new president, Robert Mugabe, but within several years he was decrying the government’s corruption, and the opposition and threats directed at him eventually led Mapfumo to move his family to the U.S. Though in exile, he continues to release music that is incendiary both musically and lyrically. His 2007 appearance at Ashkenaz is featured on the CD “Live at Ashkenaz, Vol. 1: Africa.”

Artist’s Talk: Clear Thoughts on Muddy Matter

Sunday, February 21st, 2016 - Sunday, February 21st, 2016, 1 - 3pm

Richmond Art Center
2540 Barrett Ave.

In Richmond

Nancy Servis and John Toki talk clay, Voulkos, Arneson, Frey. Many know these Bay Area artists, but how many know the in-depth story? Ceramic historian Nancy Servis and Bay Area clay leader John Toki present anew this diverse history through the creative work of fine potters, sculptors, and unconventional practitioners reflecting the region’s tradition of innovation and influence.

Van Gogh (Maurice Pialat France, 1991)

Sunday, February 21st, 2016 - Sunday, February 21st, 2016, 1:30PM

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

Pialat might well have been drawn to the story of Van Gogh, having himself abandoned painting for lack of funds and enjoyed grudging recognition as a director. But he looks at Van Gogh without pity, as an artist who owns his character; who is part of and apart from a true and bustling world, recreated by Pialat with casual exactness that tips the brush to Renoir (père and fils); and who is daily involved and occasionally buoyed by people drawn to him in affection and exasperation (a marvelous ensemble cast). In the last two months of his life Van Gogh (Jacques Dutronc) is engaged with the collector Gachet, whose stinginess he repays by sexually liberating his daughter; and with his brother Theo, whose indifference to Vincent's art is awkwardly masked by love. Only after the artist's suicide do we see these days as a winding down, a taking stock, a bringing of joys and resentments to their denouement; then we see quiet irascibility as fearsome weariness.

Part of the Love Exists: The Films of Maurice Pialat series at the BAMPFA.

Free gallery admission with same-day film ticket!

¡FRIENDS, FUN, FAULTS & FIXINS! The Las Mecánicas Grand Opening

Sunday, February 21st, 2016 - Sunday, February 21st, 2016, 3:00 - 8:00 PM

West Oakland Tires & Repairs
914 W. Grand Ave.

In Oakland

Las Mecánicas, the Bay Area's one and only auto mechanic non-profit is open for business! This up and coming female empowerment organization is committed to ensuring that anyone who wants to know more about their cars can do so, free of charge. Our kick-off car care clinic is @ 3pm and party will start @6pm on Sunday, February 21, 2016 at 914 W. Grand Ave. Oakland, CA 94607.

FRIENDS:
Our car care clinics are a great way to meet your fellow community members in a fun, activity-based environment. The kick-off workshop will take place from 3:00 – 5:00pm.

FUN:
After the workshop winds down, our DJ, MCs, open bar, & BBQ will be firing up! The party will kick off by 6:00pm to the tunes of Hip Hop for Change's own DJ Innalect & MC Malik Diamond. Headlining is Thizzler on The Roof's youth group Flex Gang & many more!

FAULTS:
Have any mechanical issues on your car you need help with, but can't afford a professional mechanic? No problem. Rent out one of our lifts & we'll fix it together within your budget.

FIXINS:
Enter our raffle for just $2 to win free tires, oil changes, tire rotations, alignments, & even a few TV mounts for your home theater needs.

“Soggy Sundays” Kids’ Series: Cascada de Flores

Sunday, February 21st, 2016 - Sunday, February 21st, 2016, 3:00pm-4:30pm

Ashkenaz
1307 San Pablo Ave.

In Berkeley

$6 kids/$8 adults

The lively Mexican music of Cascada de Flores concludes the 2016 edition of our winter kids show series “Soggy Sundays.” Soggy Sundays are Ashkenaz’s series of kids’ shows that chase the rain away. A wide array of top family-oriented artists provides engaging entertainment for young children and parents each week through February 21, playing music from around the world for dancing, jumping, and spinning on the best dance floor in the East Bay!

Cascada de Flores (Cascade of Flowers) features singer Arwen Lawrence and guitarist Jorge Liceaga as they perform “The Tree and the Donkey Who Loved to Sing (El Árbol y el Burro que Quería Cantar)” for children of all ages. In this bilingual and participatory program, Cascada de Flores tells its own origin story of traditional music and dance, which explodes with rhyme, fun musical instruments and sweet characters. You might meet the donkey and its jawbone, the abuelito and the vulture, the marimbol, the dance box, and the little “mosquito” guitar. Children and their families are invited to sing, dance and play with beautiful traditional songs and dance pieces including such traditional Mexican sones as “El Gallo” (the rooster), “El Tecolote” (the owl) and “El Zopilote” (the vulture). Inspired by the trio’s journey to Veracruz, Mexico, where old traditions are kept alive by generations of families in the countryside, this story speaks of the diversity of roots in Mexico (especially the indigenous, Spanish and African roots), improvisation and inventiveness within traditions, life and death in nature and, from nature, the making of musical instruments and song.

As a roster artist with both Young Audiences of Northern California and Performances to Grow On in Ventura, Cascada de Flores has performed in more than 300 schools, reaching more than 50,000 students with their educational program. In addition, Cascada de Flores was featured twice in World Arts West’s arts education program People Like Me.

Plucky Strum

Sunday, February 21st, 2016, 4:30 PM

California Jazz Conservatory
2087 Addison St.

In Berkeley

Plucky Strum is an acoustic duo from bass virtuoso Harvie S and "sizzling guitar goddess" Sheryl Bailey. They will be performing music from their critically acclaimed Whaling City Sound debut album (JazzTimes, Jazziz, Vintage Guitar, Just Jazz Guitar). Crossing genres from jazz, Latin, folk, and chamber music, Plucky Strum explores the joy of improvisation with infectious melodies and interplay.

Short Bio
Harvie S is a veteran of the jazz and Latin music scenes - known for his long standing duo project with jazz vocal legend Sheila Jordan, he has recorded and toured with the cream of the crop: Kenny Baron, Dexter Gordon, Stan Getz, John Scofield, James Weidman, Pat Martino, Mike Stern and Paul Motian. Guitarist/Composer Sheryl Bailey has toured worldwide with her organ trio, The Sheryl Bailey 3, her quartet (featuring Jim Ridl), The Electric Ladyland Project (featuring Vic Juris). She is a professor at Berklee College of Music and voted a "Rising Star" in the 2013, 2014, and 2015 Downbeat Jazz Critics Poll. facebook.com/pluckystrum

The Kind Buds plus David Gans

Sunday, February 21st, 2016 - Sunday, February 21st, 2016, 7:00pm

Ashkenaz
1317 San Pablo Ave., Berkeley CA 94702

In Berkeley

Ticket: $12

The Kind Buds
The Kind Buds take their audiences on a rollercoaster of tension and release, trading fiery-sweet guitar licks with raucous, wide-open acoustic jams and stunning guitar interplay. Tight vocal harmonies complement and complete their polished sound. The Buds are grassroots to the core. The music they play is solely acoustic – they use no enhancements in any of their performances and play from their hearts. Uncle Dave of the syndicated radio show “Dead Air” says, “The Kind Buds represent everything that is beautiful about the music of the Grateful Dead and the scene that grew up around the band.”

Sam Cutler, former tour manager of the Rolling Stones and Grateful Dead, had this to say about The Kind Buds: “My earliest memories of music I loved were of the Everly Brothers – The Kind Buds remind me of them, a fabulous combination of wonderful vocals & hot guitar-playing. The Kind Buds have got it all, if I were younger I would manage them in a flat minute.” Cutler went on to write on his Facebook page, “The Kind Buds play the best acoustic version of the Grateful Dead I have ever heard.”
http://www.thekindbuds.com

David Gans
David Gans is a longtime regular at Ashkenaz Grateful Dead nights. The Oakland-based singer-songwriter-guitarist-composer also has long written about the Dead, hosts the weekly “Dead to the World” program (Wednesdays on KPFA, 94.1 FM), and produces the nationally syndicated “Grateful Dead Hour.” He is Sirius Radio’s Grateful Dead channel programming consultant and co-hosts its Sunday afternoon “Tales from the Golden Road.” Gans is a prolific solo performer in clubs and at festivals around the country, where he mixes his own compositions with favorites by an array of folk and rock artists, often with social and political underpinnings.

Punta Rock and Soca Love; Garif; Dignitary Stylish; Prosperity Movement and Melissa Jones & No Lovely Thing

Sunday, February 21st, 2016 - Sunday, February 21st, 2016, 7:30pm

Ashkenaz
1307 San Pablo Ave.

In Berkeley

$18/$15 advance
Reggae dance lesson with Kaye Sweat at 7:30 pm

Punta Gold presents a one-night Valentine’s Day festival showcasing young soca and punta rock musicians and DJs for dancing. It is one of Ashkenaz’s 2016 series “Think Globally, Dance Locally.” Ashkenaz has been a celebrated home for music and dance from around the world for more than 40 years. Through Think Globally, Dance Locally, we are building on that history to bring more voices, more conversations, and more joy to more people in the Ashkenaz tradition of fostering intercultural peace and understanding.

Don’t panic if you’ve never danced Belizean punta, because it’s a family affair and everyone participates! Punta is a dance style that began in the Central American country Belize, on the Caribbean coast next to Mexico and Guatemala. Tonight Punta Gold hosts this social event to promote Belizean music along with Caribbean soca with some of its fast rising stars. There will be live performances by Dignitary Stylist, Dj Big Rich, Melissa Jones, No Lovely Thing, Dan' Nelle Emerson, Jazmin, Prosperity Movement, Domonique Reignz, Jeremiah B, Skrill Gates, Humble ShowOffs, Luzion, Illa Money and JJwill.


ATC Lecture - Hito Steyerl - 'Proxies and Placeholders'

Monday, February 22nd, 2016 - Monday, February 22nd, 2016, 2/22/16, 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM

Banatao Auditorium, Sutardja Dai Hall, UC Berkeley
2594 Hearst Avenue

In Berkeley

Hito Steyerl is one of the most critically acclaimed artists working in the field of video today. Holding a PhD in philosophy from the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna and teaching at the Universitat der Kunste Berlin, she is also a frequent contributer to E-Flux magazine, a lecturer, and an engaged thinker on the topics at the core of her practice: the materiality of digital media, technological manipulation, and institutional power relations.

Born in Munich, Steyerl studied film at the Japan Institute of the Moving Image and the University of Television and Film in Munich. Her work was soon selected for the 2008 Shanghai Biennale and the 2010 Gwangju Taipei biennials. In 2010, Steyerl was awarded the New Visions Award at the Copenhagen International Documentary Festival for her film In Free Fall. She has also been prominently featured as part of documenta 12 in Kassel, Germany, and the 2013 Venice Biennale.

This February, MOCA in Los Angeles will present the U.S. premiere of Steyerl's landmark video installation Factory of the Sun. In this immersive work, which debuted at the 2015 German Pavilion at the Venice Biennale, Steyerl probes the pleasures and perils of image circulation in a moment defined by the unprecedented global flow of data. Ricocheting between genres-news reportage, documentary film, video games, and internet dance videos-Factory of the Sun uses the motifs of light and acceleration to explore what possibilities are still available for collective resistance when surveillance has become a mundane part of an increasingly virtual world. This video work tells the surreal story of workers whose forced moves in a motion capture studio are turned into artificial sunshine.

Presented by Berkeley Center for New Media/Art Techonology & Culture Colloquium [ATC].

Free and open to the public.

The Longest Kiss (Alexandra Sicotte-Levesque Canada, 2013)

Monday, February 22nd, 2016 - Monday, February 22nd, 2016, 7PM

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

Preceded by:
CHOLO (Muzna Almusafer, Oman, 2014).
Two stepbrothers, one fair skinned and the other dark, meet for the first time. (21 mins, Color, Blu-ray)

“How can the land be lost when the future belongs to the Nile?” asks a protagonist in this poetic documentary on the present and future of Sudan, filmed during its split into Sudan and South Sudan. Profiling radio hosts, jilted lovers, former street kids, Sudanese Canadian returnees, Muslims and Christians, Arabs and Africans, and more, The Longest Kiss takes us up and down the Nile to capture the mood of a people and a region. Drawing upon the rich traditions of Arabic poetry and the eloquence of its own subjects, it moves beyond mere reporting to become a window into the new Sudan.

Part of the African Film Festival 2016 series at the BAMPFA.

Free gallery admission with same-day film ticket!

Full: First

Monday, February 22nd, 2016 - Monday, February 22nd, 2016, 7PM - 9PM

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

An evening of composer-performers including Evan Ziporyn, influential clarinetist and cofounder of the Bang on a Can All-Stars. Though based on the East Coast, Cal alumnus Ziporyn maintains his ties to Berkeley; his opera A House in Bali premiered at Cal Performances in 2009. Local groundbreaking singer and composer Amy X Neuburg, who has “scoped out her own territory in the gulf between pop and classical” (Village Voice), returns to BAMPFA as well. And the delightfully inventive Luciano Chessa performs his irreverent and abstract sonic experiments in our new building for the first time.

Plus explore the exhibition galleries and discover simultaneous performances throughout the building.

Full is included with BAMPFA admission. Please note, seating is very limited.

An Evening with Palestinian Poet Remi Kanazi!

Tuesday, February 23rd, 2016 - Tuesday, February 23rd, 2016, 2/23/16, 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM

Berkeley Fellowship of Unitarian Universalists
1924 Cedar Street

In Berkeley

The Middle East Children's Alliance (MECA) & the Arab Resource & Organizing Center (AROC) present:

An Evening with Palestinian Poet Remi Kanazi

Celebrating his new book: "Before the Next Bomb Drops: Rising Up From Brooklyn to Palestine"

Featuring Special Guest: Spoken Word Artist Sojari Bradley
MC: Sharif Zakout

Remi Kanazi's poetry presents an unflinching look at the lives of Palestinians under occupation and as refugees scattered across the globe. He captures the Palestinian people's refusal to be erased, gives voice to the ongoing struggle for liberation, and explores the meaning of international solidarity. His new book also examines racism in America, police brutality, US militarism at home & wars abroad, and Islamophobia.

"Kanazi's haunting poems are not written to be consumed. They reserve a place in one's conscience, in one's memory, and-hopefully-in one's praxis."
-Omar Barghouti, co-founder of the Boycott/Divestment/Sanctions movement

"Each verse made me sink deeper into my chair and helped unleash a cascade of relieving tears: in anger, in mourning, and in hope."
-Noura Erakat, George Mason University

Benefit for MECA and AROC

Presented by Middle East Children's Alliance.

$15 general, $10 low-income.

Tom Rigney & Flambeau

Tuesday, February 23rd, 2016 - Tuesday, February 23rd, 2016, 8:00pm

Ashkenaz
1317 San Pablo Ave., Berkeley CA 94702

In Berkeley

Tickets: $12

Tom Rigney
He may have been crowned Emperor of the 2011 Sacramento Jazz Jubilee, but violinist-fiddler-composer and singer Tom Rigney and his band Flambeau have always been royalty at Ashkenaz. When not globetrotting – last summer the band traveled from San Francisco (Yerba Buena Gardens) to Venice and Istanbul – they hold court here almost monthly, playing Rigney’s own tunes and their usual high-energy mix of Louisiana Cajun, zydeco, New Orleans R&B, and down-home blues favorites. Some songs are pulled from the recent CD/DVD recorded at the Harris Center for the Arts in Folsom, “Swamp Fever – Live at Three Stages,” whose video will be part of the upcoming PBS-TV summer music series, “Music Gone Public.” Featured songs range from “Iko Iko” to “Orange Blossom Special” and “C’est la Vie.”

What sets Rigney and Flambeau apart is Rigney’s fresh musical takes on Cajun and zydeco, and other styles he loves to play from rock to classical, creating a celebration of life through dance rhythms. Flambeau is a tight ensemble of virtuoso musicians, with guitarist Danny Caron (Charles Brown’s bandleader; he and Rigney met when both backed up Rockin’ Sidney in the ’80s), boogie-woogie keyboardist Caroline Dahl, bassist and singer Steve Parks, and drummer Brent Rampone.

NFPF Preservation Highlights with Lecture

Wednesday, February 24th, 2016 - Wednesday, February 24th, 2016, 3:10PM

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

Special admission applies, see site for details.

Lecture/screening class (3 hours)
Lecture by Jeff Lambert, Executive Director of the National Film Preservation Foundation.
Live music by Judith Rosenberg on piano.

The San Francisco–based National Film Preservation Foundation (NFPF) is dedicated to saving American films made outside the commercial sector. Since the NFPF’s inception in 1997, the organization has preserved more than 2,200 films. Executive director Jeff Lambert will offer an overview of the mission and activities of the NFPF and present a selection of films they have helped preserve, from silent-era social-issue films, documentaries, and short narratives to orphan films and artist-made independent productions.

The Breath of a Nation (Gregory La Cava, US, 1919, 6 mins, Silent, B&W, 35mm, From George Eastman Museum)

Children Who Labor (Thomas Edison Company, US, 1912, 13 mins, Silent, B&W, 35mm, From The Museum of Modern Art)

Interior New York Subway, 14th Street to 42nd Street (American Mutoscope and Biograph Company, shot by G.W. Bitzer, US, 1905, 5 mins, Silent, B&W, 35mm, From The Museum of Modern Art)

Lyman H. Howe’s Famous Ride on a Runaway Train (US, 1921, 6 mins, Silent with track, B&W, Digital)

Running Around San Francisco for an Education (C.R. Skinner, US, 1938, 0:90 mins, B&W, 35mm, BAMPFA collection)

Notes on the Port of St. Francis (Frank Stauffacher, US, 1951, 22 mins, B&W, 16mm, BAMPFA collection)

Faces and Fortunes (Goldshall Design Associates for Kimberly-Clark, US, 1960, 12:30 mins, Color, 16mm, From Chicago Film Archives)

Multiple Sidosis (Sid Laverents, US, 1977, 10 mins, Color, 35mm, From UCLA Film & Television Archive)


Part of In Focus: The Role of Film Archives at the BAMPFA.

Free gallery admission with same-day film ticket!

Curators in Conversation

Wednesday, February 24th, 2016, 6:00 pm

Berkeley Art Center
1275 Walnut St

In Berkeley

Curators in Conversation
What does it mean to think about abstraction?
with curators Natasha Boas and Larry Rinder, director of BAMPFA
Wednesday, February 24 at 6 pm
Free and open to the public

Curators in Conversation

Wednesday, February 24th, 2016 - Wednesday, February 24th, 2016, 6pm

Berkeley Art Center
1275 Walnut Street

In Berkeley

Curators in Conversation
What does it mean to think about abstraction?
with curators Natasha Boas and Larry Rinder, director of BAMPFA
Wednesday, February 24 at 6 pm
Free and open to the public

One Cut, One Life (Ed Pincus, United States, 2014)

Wednesday, February 24th, 2016 - Wednesday, February 24th, 2016, 7PM

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

Ed Pincus is best known for Diaries, in which he filmed himself and his family for five years in the 1970s, exploring how the “personal is political,” before giving up filmmaking and becoming a flower farmer. When diagnosed with a terminal illness, he again turns to film to understand the impact of his mortality on himself and his relationships, which now include filmmaker and collaborator Lucia Small. She too has a trauma to explore: two of her friends have recently died violent deaths. The film raises fascinating questions about what it means to bring a camera into a deeply personal situation.

Part of the Documentary Voices 2016 series at the BAMPFA.

Free gallery admission with same-day film ticket!

Stu Allen & Mars Hotel

Wednesday, February 24th, 2016 - Wednesday, February 24th, 2016, 8:00pm

Ashkenaz
1317 San Pablo Ave., Berkeley CA 94702

In Berkeley

$13

Stu Allen
A tradition started back in the 20th century, Ashkenaz’s Grateful Dead Night is always evolving, reaching new heights since Stu Allen & Mars Hotel launched a weekly residency in late 2011. Led by acclaimed guitarist-singer Allen (of Phil Lesh & Friends, Melvin Seals & JGB, Ghosts of Electricity), a revolving cast of incredibly talented musicians inhabits Mars Hotel, drawing from the Grateful Dead’s vast catalog to delight Deadheads and dancers of all generations. A Mars Hotel show is always an energetic evening of good vibes, good music, and good community.

When it became apparent that Jerry Garcia had played his final show in 1995, Stu Allen began working to keep Garcia’s music, sound, and spirit alive in the concert setting. He regularly works with Phil Lesh and has also played sets with Bob Weir and Bill Kreutzmann. Allen is perhaps most known for fronting Melvin Seals’ tribute to the Jerry Garcia Band from 2004 to 2011. He received more national acclaim in 2010 when he toured with Dark Star Orchestra. Allen shares the Grateful Dead’s commitment to making each performance a unique event, from preparation to execution. He will perform multiple shows before playing the same song twice, and even then, that song will not be realized in quite the same way.

Mars Hotel takes this idea a step further by presenting a new band at each performance. Drawing from the rich music scene of the Bay Area, Allen has assembled a broad and ever-rotating group of musicians that makes each concert a once-only experience. As far as Grateful Dead tribute bands go, this is a concept that has never been done before.

7th Street Band Showcase

Thursday, February 25th, 2016 - Thursday, February 25th, 2016, 9:00pm

Ashkenaz
1317 San Pablo Ave., Berkeley CA 94702

In Berkeley

7th Street Band
Berkeley’s 7th Street Band has made its name backing some of the greats and new voices of reggae and running its own studio. While 7th Street Band has been hitting the West Coast stages for a decade, drummer Edi Arnold and keyboardist Benjamin Goff, friends since high school, have played together since 1992. More recently they added guitarist Jason Collins of the Funkanauts and later rounded out the group with saxophonist Barry Capiaux and bass player Jan Isaac. 7th Street Band has been called one of the Bay Area’s best-kept musical secrets and has backed many top touring vocalists, including Konshens, Marlon Asher, Fantan Mojah, and Lloyd Brown. Other artists 7th Street has worked with include Army, Wadi Gad, Tuff Lion, Messenjah Selah, Earl Zero, Winstrong, and Luv Fyah.

Patrick Kirch on Marshall Islands Navigational Charts

Friday, February 26th, 2016 - Friday, February 26th, 2016, 12:15pm-1pm

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

Patrick V. Kirch is Chancellor's Professor Emeritus and the Class of 1954 Professor of Anthropology and Integrative Biology, as well as curator of Oceanic archaeology at the Hearst Museum of Anthropology. Kirch’s research focuses on the Pacific islands as a way to understand the complex dynamics between humans and their ecosystems, which he will explore through a discussion of the intricate Marshall Islands navigational charts on view.

Part of the Perspectives on the Architecture of Life series at the BAMPFA.

Lunchtime talks are included with BAMPFA admission.

Heart & Mind - Roseanna Vitro & Mark Soskin

Friday, February 26th, 2016, 8:00

California Jazz Conservatory
2087 Addison St.

In Berkeley

This Grammy-nominated orchestra of two returns to the CJC with a performance rooted in thirty years of passion and engagement across a host of diverse styles. Featuring Roseanna Vitro on vocals and Mark Soskin on piano.

Short Bio
Mark Soskin was born in Brooklyn, N.Y, and is one of the most sought after pianists on the scene today. Soskins is known for his exquisite musicianship, arranging skills, and high energy playing, as well as his capacity for different styles in a host of diverse groups. He has recorded and performed with Sonny Rollins, Joe Henderson, Randy Brecker, Stanley Turrentine, Herbie Mann, John Abercrombie, Sheila Jordan, The NY Voices, and more. Mark’s arrangements pivoted The Music of Randy Newman into a Grammy Nomination for Roseanna Vitro and their group. Their latest release is Clarity: Music of Clare Fischer. marksoskin.com

The Denver Post calls Roseanna Vitro “a creative storyteller who sings jazz like she means it, understands lyrics and knows how to caress a melody and, most of all, swings like mad.” In 2012, Vitro received her first Grammy Nomination for The Music of Randy Newman on Motema Music. She has recorded 14 critically acclaimed recordings and performed with; Kenny Werner, Fred Hersch, Kenny Baron, Elvin Jones, Joe Lovano, Gary Bartz, Al Foster, George Coleman, Fathead Newman, Arnett Cobb, Mark Soskin, Sara Caswell, Dean Johnson, Tim Horner, Eddie Gomez, and more. RoseannaVitro.com

We Will Not Grow Old Together (Maurice Pialat France, 1972)

Friday, February 26th, 2016 - Friday, February 26th, 2016, 8:15PM

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

Jean (Jean Yanne) and Catherine (Marlène Jobert) are in the sixth year of an extramarital affair. He is a film director; she is less educated, as he likes to point out. When he takes her to the south of France on a film shoot, it all falls apart. Then, comes back together. Then falls apart, as relationships, especially abusive ones, do. Pialat's mature and rigorous look at the process is unabashedly autobiographical (actor Yanne even resembles the director). And, though it was his first film with professional actors, and his first box-office success, it is edited with a very personal (dis)orientation ("the overwhelming sense of life re-edited with just the embarrassing and unpleasant bits left in," as Sight & Sound's David Thompson wrote). "This is an important feminist film by a male director. … Considering Pialat's connection to the film, it is a brutally honest self-analysis. Jean Yanne is superb as a loving and destructive man" (Melissa Biggs, French Films).

Part of the Love Exists: The Films of Maurice Pialat series at the BAMPFA.

Free gallery admission with same-day film ticket!

Songs for a New World

Friday, February 26th, 2016 - Sunday, February 28th, 2016, February 26-27, 8pm-10pm, February 28, 2pm-4pm

Masquers Playhouse
105 Park Place

In

In the world of musical theater, shows often attain cult status. Songs for a New World is one of those shows. It introduced the world to composer Jason Robert Brown (The Last 5 Years, Parade, 13, The Bridges of Madison County)-now a three-time Tony-winner-and gave the world a passel of new cabaret standards. This song cycle takes us through sixteen exciting, self-contained stories-in-song, performed by a brilliant cast of the Bay Area's finest vocal talent. All proceeds benefit the Masquers Playhouse.

Presented by Masquers Playhouse.

$25

See and Make Art Family Workshop

Saturday, February 27th, 2016 - Saturday, February 27th, 2016, 1 - 2:30 pm

Richmond Public Library
325 Civic Center Plaza

In Richmond

See and Make Art Family Workshops

Meet in the Madeline F. Whittlesey Room in the Richmond Public Library. Start with a story, continue with an art-making project, and then finish with a guided tour of the galleries at the Art Center. Free and open to kids of all ages!

Kids must be accompanied by an adult. For groups of 6 or more kids, please call us in advance at 510.620.6772. Otherwise, no registration is required.

This workshop takes place on the last Saturday of every month.

Dance Education Forum

Saturday, February 27th, 2016 - Saturday, February 27th, 2016, 1:00 pm -4:00 pm

Luna Dance Institute: Berkeley Aquatic Park Studio
605 Addison Street

In Berkeley

Dance Education Forum presented by Luna Dance Institute on February 27, 2016 1-4 pm is a community roundtable bringing together artists and educators to discuss and share the promises and pitfalls of creating, developing and sustaining high quality dance education practices. This year’s theme: Artistic Practice asks: how does your dance-making self and dance-teaching self-interact for maximum creativity? This is a free event held at our Berkeley Aquatic Park Studio. All voices are welcome. For more information and to register, contact Nia at nwomack-freeman@lunadanceinstitute.org, 510-883-1118.

Black History Month - Clairdee: The Soulful Songstress

Saturday, February 27th, 2016, 8:00

California Jazz Conservatory
2087 Addison St.

In Berkeley

It might seem strange to describe a singer as hip as Clairdee as a throwback, but she’s an artist who embodies creative values that hearken back to a time when jazz and entertainment blended seamlessly together. Combining scene-stealing charisma with heartfelt humility and a sincere belief in the transformative power of music, she has honed a repertoire of standards set to state of the art arrangements that are equally smart and entertaining.

“In crowd pleasing form - a whole lot of interpretive brilliance.”
-JazzTimes

“Generous spirit and unpretentious sincerity.”
-Down Beat

“In the tradition of all great vocalists, Clairdee infuses her own unique style while always remaining true to the song itself.”
-Nancy Wilson

“Among the most skilled, appealing singers around. Fine songs, beautiful voice, great moves.”
-San Francisco Examiner

Short Bio
Clairdee has released three highly praised recordings and tours internationally playing to sold-out houses and garnering rave-reviews. In addition to her trio or quartet, she has performed with and opened for artists as diverse as Bucky Pizzarelli, Boz Scaggs, David Sanborn, Cyrus Chestnut, Ken Peplowski, Houston Person, and the late, great Etta James. clairdee.com

Macy Blackman & the Mighty Fines

Saturday, February 27th, 2016 - Saturday, February 27th, 2016, 8:00pm

Ashkenaz
1317 San Pablo Ave., Berkeley CA 94702

In Berkeley

Tickets: $17/$13 students

Swing dance lesson
Macy Blackman & the Mighty Fines
It’s time for the hottest Crescent City Soul, from New Orleans greats Dave Bartholomew, Fats Domino, and a host of other favorites, revitalized by pianist Macy Blackman and his hard-driving band the Mighty Fines. They also feature music from their new CD, “I Didn’t Want to Do It.” Originally from Delaware, Macy Blackman made his professional debut at the age of 12 and has played music most of his life, eventually moving to San Francisco. He put together the Mighty Fines in 2003. Relocated from New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina, Ken “Snakebite” Jacobs became the band’s baritone saxophonist. Nancy Wright sings and plays tenor sax, alongside drummer Jack Dorsey and bassist Bing Nathan.
http://www.macyblackman.com

Fourth Saturday Swing: Macy Blackman & the Mighty Fines

Saturday, February 27th, 2016 - Saturday, February 27th, 2016, Lesson at 8:00 pm; Show at 9:00 pm

Ashkenaz
1307 San Pablo Ave.

In Berkeley

Tickets: $17/$13 Student

Swing dance lesson at 8pm; Show at 9pm

Macy Blackman & the Mighty Fines
It’s time for the hottest Crescent City Soul, from New Orleans greats Dave Bartholomew, Fats Domino, and a host of other favorites, revitalized by pianist Macy Blackman and his hard-driving band the Mighty Fines. They also feature music from their new CD, “I Didn’t Want to Do It.” Originally from Delaware, Macy Blackman made his professional debut at the age of 12 and has played music most of his life, eventually moving to San Francisco. He put together the Mighty Fines in 2003. Relocated from New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina, Ken “Snakebite” Jacobs became the band’s baritone saxophonist. Nancy Wright sings and plays tenor sax, alongside drummer Jack Dorsey and bassist Bing Nathan.
http://www.macyblackman.com/

Sundays @ Four: Telegraph Quartet

Sunday, February 28th, 2016 - Sunday, February 28th, 2016, 2/28/16, 4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

Crowden Music Center
1475 Rose Street

In Berkeley

Don't miss the exciting young Telegraph Quartet, 2014 Grand Prize winners in the prestigious international Fischoff Chamber Music Competition!

February 28
4pm
Free "Meet-the-Artists" reception following the concert
Crowden Music Center (1474 Rose Street, Berkeley CA 94702)

Program:

Mozart Quartet in E-flat Major, K428
Kirchner String Quartet No. 1
Dvorak String Quartet in A-flat Major, Op. 105

About Telegraph Quartet:

Eric Chin, violin
Joseph Maile, violin
Pei-Ling Lin, viola
Jeremiah Shaw, cello

The members of the quartet are graduates of top conservatories and universities including the Juilliard School, the Cleveland Institute of Music, Rice University, and the San Francisco Conservatory of Music. Collectively they have performed in concert halls and music festivals across the U.S. including Carnegie Hall, Alice Tully Hall, the Kennedy Center for Performing Arts in Washington D.C., the Hartt School at University of Hartford, Music at Gretna, Art Center Chamber Music Concerts in Teaneck NJ, and internationally from Shanghai and Taiwan to Tijuana. The quartet is dedicated to educating and inspiring the next generation of musicians.

About Sundays @ Four:

Crowden presents chamber music to the public with Sundays @ Four, our series of low-cost, informal concerts featuring distinguished chamber musicians.

Artists speak about each work and share their personal observations and inspirations in these intimate concerts, then mingle with the audience in receptions after the performance.

Tickets: $25 general admission, $20 seniors/students 18+, and free for children under 18.

http://telegraphatcrowden.bpt.me/

http://www.crowden.org/concerts-and-events/sundays-four#telegraph

Presented by Crowden Music Center.

Free to $25.

MLK Oratorical Fest PK-12 - Oakland Unified School District

Sunday, February 28th, 2016 - Sunday, February 28th, 2016, 2:30 - 6:00pm FREE!

Philip Reeder Performing Arts Center
8601 MacArthur Blvd.

In Oakland

37 years ago the Founder of the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Oratorical Fest, Donald Olliver had a vision. He wanted to showcase student’s oratorical skills and he wanted to honor Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. He felt that the testing/reading score data did not truly lift up students’ comprehension and fluency skills and abilities but he knew that delivering an oration was an academic exercise that required students to read and comprehend complex text in order to analyze, synthesize, interpret, critique, and present or perform that text (creating a new form through performance) in a competition in public speaking.

Come and see Oakland's finest!

Anna Halprin with Dohee Lee: Dance the RSVP Cycle Workshop

Sunday, February 28th, 2016 - Sunday, February 28th, 2016, 2PM - 5PM

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

“The RSVP cycles designed by Lawrence Halprin is a process in generating creativity in others. We will be experiencing this process as it relates to dance.”—Anna Halprin

American dance pioneer Anna Halprin leads a workshop in collaboration with Dohee Lee on the principles of scoring, the “science that creates art.” Halprin developed this creative methodology with her husband, architect Lawrence Halprin.

All are welcome. No previous dance training necessary.

Workshops are included with BAMPFA admission.

Capacity is very limited, advance registration recommended. Registration opens February 16th. Visit bampfa.org/tickets

Meetup for EcoFaction: Totally Dead plus Madeline Tasquin

Sunday, February 28th, 2016 - Sunday, February 28th, 2016, 6:30pm

Ashkenaz
1307 San Pablo Ave.

In Berkeley

Tickets: $5-$10 Sliding

Totally Dead
Totally Dead began when seven musicians and friends decided it would be fun to play a Grateful Dead show from the classic spring 1977 tour. They gave it a go and discovered not only that they had a blast, but the audience loved it too. Though the band grew from Grateful Dead set lists, over time they discovered the joy of creating their own original set lists. They try to incorporate songs from the late ’60s all the way up to the mid-’90s.

Totally Dead is Ned Patchett and Matt Salata on guitar and vocals, Dave Gantenbein on bass, Jaime Cintado on keyboards and vocals, Eileen Flynn Bell on vocals, and Mo Sardella and Will McCosker on drums and vocals.

Vocal Jam Session

Sunday, February 28th, 2016, 7:00

California Jazz Conservatory
2087 Addison St.

In Berkeley

The Jazzschool Community Music School Vocal Department presents a monthly jazz vocal jam session, hosted by Angharad Jones. All are welcome! Singers should bring three copies of their song for the band. Please arrive by 6:30 pm to sign up.

Lost Landscapes of Oakland, California (with Lecture)

Wednesday, March 2nd, 2016 - Wednesday, March 2nd, 2016, 3:10PM

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

Special admission applies, see site for details.

Lecture/screening class (3 hours)
Lecture by Rick Prelinger, Associate professor at UC Santa Cruz and archivist, writer, and filmmaker.

Film archivist Rick Prelinger will present an East Bay–themed version of his wildly popular Lost Landscapes series. The program will present rediscovered and rarely seen film clips of Oakland and the East Bay as documented throughout the twentieth century by amateurs, newsreel cameramen, and industrial filmmakers. The format of the presentation allows time for discussion and audience participation in the identification of local landmarks and sharing stories and historical lore. Prelinger’s experience and passion for orphaned films stems from his belief that we learn much about ourselves by studying these visual documents of our society.

Part of In Focus: The Role of Film Archives at the BAMPFA.

Free gallery admission with same-day film ticket!

Lauren Kroiz on Ad Reinhardt’s Abstract Painting

Friday, March 4th, 2016 - Friday, March 4th, 2016, 12:15pm-1pm

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

Lauren Kroiz is an assistant professor of American modern art. Her book Creative Composites: Race, Modernism, and the Stieglitz Circle brings together her interests in photography and new media, race and ethnic studies, and the relationships between abstraction and figuration. Kroiz’s talk brings her current research on Ad Reinhardt to the classic 1960–65 abstract painting from the BAMPFA collection.

Part of the Perspectives on the Architecture of Life series at the BAMPFA.

Lunchtime talks are included with BAMPFA admission.

Claude Ghez on Gustave Caillebotte’s Le Pont de l’Europe: Perspective at Play

Saturday, March 5th, 2016 - Saturday, March 5th, 2016, 12:15pm-1pm

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

Join Columbia University neuroscientist Claude Ghez for a probing exploration of how the composition of Caillebotte’s masterpiece comprises at least three different systems of linear perspective. He suggests that the artist constructed this perspectival complexity to discredit criticism of his work as excessively “photographic.” Dr. Ghez’s discussion will bring a new dimension of insight into this captivating painting, which is a highlight of Architecture of Life.

Part of the Architecture of Life series at the BAMPFA.

Free with BAMPFA gallery admission.

Lawrence Rinder: Building and Metaphor: The New BAMPFA and Architecture of Life

Saturday, March 5th, 2016 - Saturday, March 5th, 2016, 1:30PM

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

In a two-part illustrated lecture, BAMPFA Director Lawrence Rinder discusses the design of the new BAMPFA as well as his visionary opening exhibition, Architecture of Life.

Register online through UC Extension at extension.berkeley.edu or call (510) 642-4111. Please reference course number UNEX 1294-001.

Part of the Architecture of Life series at the BAMPFA.

Included with BAMPFA gallery admission. Advance registration recommended.

Pialat's Turkish Chronicles

Saturday, March 5th, 2016 - Saturday, March 5th, 2016, 6:30PM

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

In 1964, Pialat and cinematographer Willy Kurant (Masculin féminin) headed to Turkey, where they produced a series of six lyrical shorts dedicated to the country’s history and people. Subjects included the poetry of Nazim Hikmet (Maître Galip), the history of the city of Istanbul generally and its Golden Horn peninsula in particular (Byzance, Istanbul, Bosphore, and La Corne d’Or), and the wrestling competition at Pehlivan (Pehlivan).

Part of the Love Exists: The Films of Maurice Pialat series at the BAMPFA.

Free gallery admission with same-day film ticket!

The Mouth Agape (Maurice Pialat France, 1974)

Saturday, March 5th, 2016 - Saturday, March 5th, 2016, 8:15PM

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

A dutiful son (Philippe Léotard) takes his mother for radiation treatment in a Paris hospital; when she is pronounced incurable, he accompanies her back to her home in Auvergne and persuades his reluctant wife (Nathalie Baye) to join him. "Intense intimacy . . . pervaded La gueule ouverte, which dealt with a man facing up to his mother's imminent death from cancer . . . Using long takes, the film quietly discovers drama in the most banal events and achieves an awesome balance between human misery and the fleeting moments of grace that make it bearable. Deaths in the family—a time for characters to face their true feelings—were to become a recurrent motif in Pialat's films, and in La gueule ouverte the scenes depicting the mother's final hours are imbued with an awe and simplicity that border on the religious" (David Thompson, Sight & Sound).

Part of the Love Exists: The Films of Maurice Pialat series at the BAMPFA.

Free gallery admission with same-day film ticket!

Clerestory - New Lights

Sunday, March 6th, 2016 - Sunday, March 6th, 2016, 3/6/16, 4:00 PM - 5:15 PM

The David Brower Center
2150 Allston Way

In Berkeley

Clerestory closes its tenth anniversary season with a program of luminous and exciting contemporary music. Works by Eric Whitacre, Jake Heggie, and Aaron Jay Kernis will be sung alongside new songs written for Clerestory's anniversary by composers friends dear to the ensemble.

The performance will run just over an hour with no intermission.

Presented by Clerestory.

$15-25.

Red Leaves (Bazi Gete Israel, 2014)

Sunday, March 6th, 2016 - Sunday, March 6th, 2016, 5:30PM

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

Israel’s vibrant Jewish Ethiopian community is finally given screen time in Bazi Gete’s Red Leaves, which captures the uncertainty and unmooring of an elderly Ethiopian immigrant in Israel. After the death of his wife, the obstinate Meseganio Tadela finds himself bouncing from one of his children’s homes to another, unable to embrace—or fully understand—their more modern, “un-Ethiopian” ways. Proudly holding onto his roots, he soon must face up to a new generation—and an old society—that has no room for him. Inspired by King Lear, Red Leaves is a powerful vision of a community long ignored in Israeli cinema.

Part of the African Film Festival 2016 at the BAMPFA.

Free gallery admission with same-day film ticket!

The World of Apu (Satyajit Ray India, 1959) with Lecture

Wednesday, March 9th, 2016 - Wednesday, March 9th, 2016, 3:10PM

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

Special admission applies, see site for details.

Lecture/screening class (3 hours)
Lecture with Mike Pogorzelski, Director of the Academy Film Archive.

4k Digital restoration.
Part three of Satyajit Ray's much–loved Apu Trilogy, The World of Apu features Soumitra Chatterjee (Charulata, The Elephant God, Distant Thunder, etc.) as the adult Apu. Having decided to become a writer, Apu becomes, quite by accident, a husband as well. When the bridegroom at a wedding he is attending suffers a prenuptial nervous breakdown, Apu is persuaded to replace him in order to save the bride's honor. “If Ray had made nothing but Apur Sansar he would go down in film history as one of the great directors. In essence the film is a love story so fresh and spontaneous that one feels Ray created it entirely out of his own spirit, as if it were the world’s first love story” (Pauline Kael).

Part of In Focus: The Role of Film Archives at the BAMPFA.

Free gallery admission with same-day film ticket!

Primary (Albert Maysles United States, 1960)

Wednesday, March 9th, 2016 - Wednesday, March 9th, 2016, 7PM

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

Introduced by Marilyn Fabe.

A cinema-verité treatment of John F. Kennedy’s campaign against Hubert Humphrey during the 1960 primary race, Primary ranks among the most influential documentaries of the postwar period. In its Independent Film Award Citation of 1961, the committee noted that the filmmakers “have caught the scenes of real life with unprecedented authenticity, immediacy and truth . . . We see Primary as a revolutionary step and a breaking point in the recording of reality in cinema.” Fifty years later, Richard Brody wrote in the New Yorker: “If Kennedy’s election was the first political earthquake of the sixties, the filming of his campaign . . . was its cinematic counterpart.”

Part of the Documentary Voices 2016 series at the BAMPFA.

Free gallery admission with same-day film ticket!

Graduate First (Maurice Pialat France, 1979)

Friday, March 11th, 2016 - Friday, March 11th, 2016, 8:30PM

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

A typical French parent's admonition when a child wants more freedom, "graduate first," is here used ironically. Pialat's portrait of "the blank generation" of the 1970s follows several high school students as they enter the netherworld between graduation and the unemployment line. Drifters in their northern French mining town, they engage in palliative sex or desperate marriage; some head out for the anonymity of Paris. As in his previous films, Pialat looks with real insight into youthful subcultures. "Their absence of illusion, their despair, their bitterness toward society, are also those of Maurice Pialat," Jean-Baptiste Morain wrote in Film Comment. Variety called Graduate First "a tonic contrast to the recent spate of soft-hued films about youth . . . Pialat records [it all] with an acute eye for detail, gesture, and behavior and is admirably served by a cast remarkable for its naturalness and veracity. The director's omnipresent, discreet compassion never impedes his talent for social dissection."

Part of the Love Exists: The Films of Maurice Pialat series at the BAMPFA.

Free gallery admission with same-day film ticket!

Laasya 2016

Saturday, March 12th, 2016 - Saturday, March 12th, 2016, 5:00 PM

El Cerrito Performing Arts Theater
540 Ashbury Ave, El Cerrito, CA 94530

In Berkeley

Laasya is the nation’s oldest intercollegiate Indian classical dance competition. Founded by Boston University and MIT in 2010, Laasya has traveled far and wide, being hosted by various universities throughout the country. This year UC Berkeley is proud to host Laasya 2016 in the San Francisco Bay Area! Ten collegiate teams will visit in March to perform pieces they have choreographed and worked on all year, and compete for the championship title. The teams at Laasya grapple with a wide range of subjects – whether it is retelling classic Indian tales from a different perspective, exploring world cultures, or highlighting societal issues, the dancers at Laasya continue to modernize and push the boundaries of Indian Classical Dance.

Tickets for the event will be available starting in February. Check the website for the ticketing link. Pricing will be $18 for the general public, and $15 for UC Berkeley students and professors.

Run (Philippe Lacôte France, 2014)

Saturday, March 12th, 2016 - Saturday, March 12th, 2016, 8:15PM

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

A young man goes on the run after assassinating a politician, but finds he cannot out-distance his own past in this picaresque coming-of-age tale, a strong example of the rising Ivory Coast filmmaking scene and the first Ivorian feature screened at the Cannes Film Festival. Lacôte, who produced 2012’s thriller Burn It Up Djassa, polishes that film’s blend of Hollywood propulsion and Ivorian political critique, to create a landscape of simultaneous danger and wonder filled with mystic rainmakers, voluptuous competitive eaters, and blood-thirsty mercenaries. Veteran actor Isaach De Bankolé (Night on Earth, White Material) provides star presence as a political activist.

Part of the African Film Festival 2016 series at the BAMPFA.

Free gallery admission with same-day film ticket!

The House in the Woods (Maurice Pialat France, 1971)

Sunday, March 13th, 2016 - Sunday, March 13th, 2016, 1:30PM

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

A commission from French television, the seven-episode miniseries The House in the Woods is one of Maurice Pialat's best-loved works. Set during WWI, the basic plot concerns daily life in a French village as experienced by a gamekeeper and his wife who take in children left abandoned in the war. Some children grow accustomed to their new surroundings; others never lose that look of sadness at having been abandoned. At times the war is very far away; at other times, it's right outside their door. The sharp characterizations and precise narration of the early episodes eventually give way to a looser, more improvisatory style, as if once Pialat has created this world he simply allows the audience to experience it. "If I had to choose the one film that best allows the viewer to penetrate into Maurice Pialat's universe, I would unhesitatingly choose The House in the Woods. This series happily combines a profound naturalism and a strange sense of fantasy, a liberty in its tone where hidden or manifested suffering alternates with an astonishing happiness to be alive" (Joel Magny, Cahiers du Cinema).

Part of the Love Exists: The Films of Maurice Pialat series at the BAMPFA.

Free gallery admission with same-day film ticket!

The Missing Picture (Rithy Panh, Cambodia, 2013) with Lecture

Wednesday, March 16th, 2016 - Wednesday, March 16th, 2016, 3:10PM

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

Special admission applies, see site for details.

Lecture/screening class (3 hours)
Lecture by Antonella Bonfanti, Director of the Canyon Cinema Foundation.

Preceded by: 
HALL OF MIRRORS (Warren Sonbert, US, 1966).
Achingly beautiful, a film portrait of Warhol superstars René Ricard and Gerard Malanga. (7 mins, Color, 16mm, BAMPFA Collection)

THE DARK TOWER (Stan Brakhage, US, 1999).
A hand-painted, step-printed work of abstract light play by one of the towering figures of the American avant-garde. (Color, Silent, 2:30 mins, BAMPFA Collection)

A daunting task that continues to confront media makers is how to represent the unrepresentable—calamities and atrocities of unimaginable magnitude. The challenge is even greater when the media maker himself is a survivor. Such is the case for veteran filmmaker Rithy Panh, who has committed his life to probing and exposing the Cambodian genocide and its aftermath. Having toiled in labor camps as a boy and watched his entire family die, he prepares to grapple with this childhood. Using clay figures, archival footage, and live action, Panh materializes the missing pictures for us, his companion witnesses. Stunningly vivid and achingly intimate. 

Part of In Focus: The Role of Film Archives at the BAMPFA.

Free gallery admission with same-day film ticket!

The Pearl Button (Patricio Guzmán Chile, 2015)

Wednesday, March 16th, 2016 - Wednesday, March 16th, 2016, 7PM

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

In his most recent poetic film, Guzmán continues his excavation of Chile’s hidden past, fluidly shifting between the cosmic and the particular. Like his 2010 film essay, Nostalgia for the Light, The Pearl Button beautifully weaves together strands of history and of natural history; this time Guzmán probes the significance of water in order to reflect both on the decimation of the indigenous people of Patagonia—the nomadic Kaweskar or “water people”—as a result of European colonization and on the brutality of the Pinochet regime, decades later, that dropped victims into the sea from the air.

Part of the Documentary Voices 2016 series at the BAMPFA.

Free gallery admission with same-day film ticket!

Kirikou and the Sorceress (Michel Ocelot Belgium, 1998)

Saturday, March 19th, 2016 - Saturday, March 19th, 2016, 3:30PM

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

This gorgeously animated classic recounts the tale of little Kirikou, a brave newborn toddler who takes on an evil sorceress in order to save his village. Just born but raring to help his family and friends, our toddling hero heads out on the adventure of a lifetime. Senegalese music legend Youssou N’Dour provides the soundtrack for Ocelot’s beautiful cutout animations. “Filled with lessons about morality, bravery, selflessness, and compassion, Kirikou is top-shelf family entertainment” (Chicago Tribune). “Kirikou is magic from a clear sky . . . funny, charming, wise, beautiful, and exciting” (Financial Times).

Note to parents: Female characters are drawn bare-breasted and children unclothed to reflect traditional tribal dress.

Part of the African Film Festival 2016 at the BAMPFA.

Free gallery admission with same-day film ticket!

Police (Maurice Pialat France, 1985)

Saturday, March 19th, 2016 - Saturday, March 19th, 2016, 8:15PM

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

Pialat subverts the police thriller in a story surrounding a cop whose commitment to the law is camouflaged by his capricious appetites. Mangin (Gérard Depardieu) is obsessed with cracking a Tunisian drug ring operating in Paris via Marseilles; he brutalizes suspects on the theory that "if people get hurt they deserve it in some way." The words come back at him at the film's close, after he's become emotionally involved with the girlfriend of one of the dealers. Underneath the police procedural is a picture of cynicism and loneliness (cop), betrayal and vulnerability (Arabs), frantic survivalism (the Tunisians' lawyer who swings both ways). This is Depardieu's true element; he's relaxed in the ambiguities of mean and nice, cop and criminal, and released by Pialat's improvisatory style. If he's less convincing as the cop who transcends his own mediocrity to fall in love, well, for that we would need a Jean Gabin, and there was only one of him.

Part of the Love Exists: The Films of Maurice Pialat series at the BAMPFA.

Free gallery admission with same-day film ticket!

Hiroko Tamano: Four Direction Pray, a Spring Equinox Qigong Exercise

Sunday, March 20th, 2016 - Sunday, March 20th, 2016, 11AM - 12:30PM

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

On the occasion of the spring equinox, celebrated local Butoh performer and teacher Hiroko Tamano leads a playful morning exercise in energy alignment loosely inspired by Qigong. “Qi” is known as life energy and refers to the energy circulating through the body as it connects to a more universal or environment energy system. Hiroko was a disciple of Butoh founder Tatsumi Hijikata in Tokyo. She moved to Berkeley in 1979 with her husband, Koichi, who had brought Butoh to the United States in 1976.

Workshops are included with BAMPFA admission.

Voices of Music: The Art of the Countertenor

Sunday, March 20th, 2016, 7:30pm

St. Mary Magdalen Church
2005 Berryman St

In Berkeley

Direct from London, countertenor sensation Christopher Lowrey joins us for Arias of Handel, Bach and Vivaldi. From suave and beautiful sacred music to dramatic and virtuosic opera arias, this concert will be a feast for your ears. Christopher Lowrey, countertenor Lisa Grodin, Kati Kyme, Carla Moore, Maxine Nemerovski, Farley Pearce, Elisabeth Reed, Gabrielle Wunsch, baroque strings Hanneke van Proosdij, recorder, organ, harpsichord David Tayler, archlute

Full: Voice

Wednesday, March 23rd, 2016 - Wednesday, March 23rd, 2016, 7PM - 9PM

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

An exploration of the human voice with virtuoso singers. The internationally acclaimed Pamela Z performs, working her magic with live electronic processing and sampled sound. In addition, bass vocalist Richard Mix joins us, reprising his performance of unaccompanied works by renowned composer Julian Eastman that thrilled L@TE audiences four years ago. Also filling our space with music is the Cornelius Cardew Choir, a local “Deep Listening” collective that pushes the boundaries of vocal performance practice.

Explore the exhibition galleries and discover simultaneous performances throughout the building.

Full is included with BAMPFA admission. Please note, seating is very limited.

SALTA Dance Collective: Pseudo, Anti, and Total Dance

Friday, March 25th, 2016 - Friday, March 25th, 2016, 6PM - 8PM

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

Turn BAMPFA into a dance deck / disco / shrine! SALTA hosts an evening of experimental dance and performance that will take place throughout the spaces of the new BAM/PFA building—exploring newness, crevices, and ghosts. Performers respond to the potentials of the architecture, which intertwines old and new forms. SALTA is in ongoing collaboration with other dancers, watchers, spaces, curators, and collectives, and is invested in feminisms. SALTA is BAMPFA!

SALTA is a collective of dancers that curates a free monthly mobile performance series in the East Bay. It approaches curation as an experiment in: dancers making space for dance to happen, trying new formats of presenting and thinking about performance, taking care of performers, and being open to wildcards. saltadance.info

Workshops are included with BAMPFA admission.

Le Garçu (Maurice Pialat France, 1995)

Friday, March 25th, 2016 - Friday, March 25th, 2016, 8:30PM

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

Gérard Depardieu once again shows his extraordinary range, this time as a Parisian professional in the throes of deciding whether or not to leave his wife for his mistress. At the same time, as the father of a little boy (played by the director's young son), he finds his lumbering presence and natural aggression keeping him from blending into the "landscape" of family life. "The chief victim of his own desire for solitude and insatiable need for consolation, the Pialat male is also obsessively afraid of losing what little he has left. Le Garçu is entirely devoted to this horror of loss . . . Pialat's art, which consists of successive compressions and revelations, is that of an illusionist of the real . . . [His] urge to return to the autobiographical vein arose . . . from a desire to explore the event that most deeply affected his final years: the birth of his first child" (Frédéric Bonnaud, Film Comment).

Part of the Love Exists: The Films of Maurice Pialat series at the BAMPFA.

Free gallery admission with same-day film ticket!

A Workshop & Symposium on AfroSurrealism, Comics, & Social Justice

Saturday, March 26th, 2016 - Saturday, March 26th, 2016, 1-7 p.m.

African American Museum and Library at Oakland
659 14th Street Oakland, CA 94612

In Oakland

Join us at the African American Museum and Library at Oakland (659 14th St.) on Sat., March 26,1-4 pm for workshops and panels on speculative fiction, comics, and art--and discussions about how we can use creativity to build a better world. More than a dozen local artists will be featured, and there will be a wine and cheese reception from 5-7 pm to honor the Bay's own Juliana “Jewels” Smith--the writer, cultural worker, organizer, and educator and creator of (H)afrocentric: the Comic. For more information, call (510) 637-0200.

Julia Bryan-Wilson on Ruth Asawa's Wire Sculptures and Louise Bourgeois's Hanging Bronzes

Friday, April 1st, 2016 - Friday, April 1st, 2016, 12:15pm-1pm

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

Julia Bryan-Wilson is associate professor of modern and contemporary art and author of the upcoming Art in the Making: From the Studio to Crowdsourcing (with Glenn Adamson). Her research interests include feminist and queer art, textile handicraft, and questions of materiality—all germane to different aspects of the work of artists Ruth Asawa and Louise Bourgeois.

Part of Perspectives on the Architecture of Life series at the BAMPFA.

Lunchtime talks are included with BAMPFA admission.

Kiki's Delivery Service (Hayao Miyazaki Japan, 1998)

Saturday, April 2nd, 2016 - Saturday, April 2nd, 2016, 3:30PM

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

When a witch turns thirteen, she must leave home for a year of training, so young Kiki takes off with her mother's broom, her father's radio, and her own black cat, the sardonic Jiji. Unskilled in sorcery, she supports herself as best she can, delivering parcels by broom. Kiki's journey takes place in a gorgeously realized alternate Europe where quaint cobbled streets teem with 1930s–style cars and dirigible voyages appear on live television. Beguiling us into this familiar-strange world, Miyazaki intersperses episodes of exhilarating adventure with more contemplative moments than most contemporary kids' films allow. Soaring flight scenes eloquently express the expansive sensations of newfound independence. With help from women of several generations—a kindly baker, a grandmotherly customer, a free-spirited young painter—Kiki grapples with the same insecurities that trouble all adolescents, and learns that even when the magic of childhood fades, there are new enchantments to discover.

English Language Version.

Part of the Movie Matinees for All Ages series at the BAMPFA.

Free gallery admission with same-day film ticket!

A Hen in the Wind (Yasujiro Ozu Japan, 1948) with Lecture

Wednesday, April 6th, 2016 - Wednesday, April 6th, 2016, 3:10PM

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

Special admission applies, see site for details.

Lecture/screening class (3 hours).
Lecture by Susan Oxtoby, BAMPFA Senior curator. Response by filmmaker Nathanial Dorsky.

"Ozu brilliantly and honestly confronts the postwar moment" (Joan Mellon) in this tragedy of a destitute woman, Tokiko (Kinuyo Tanaka), awaiting her husband's demobilization. When her son becomes ill, she takes the advice of a meddlesome neighbor and prostitutes herself to pay the hospital bill. Upon his return, the husband is irate; it is only when he visits a prostitute himself that he begins to understand what his wife has gone through. Ozu evinces an almost Mizoguchean focus on the oppressed woman before taking up the context that would become his treasured domain: the deterioration of the Japanese family, and the resilience of its individual members, under the onslaught of modern life. 

Part of In Focus: Japanese Film Classics at the BAMPFA.

Free gallery admission with same-day film ticket!

Susan Billy: The Pomo Basket

Sunday, April 10th, 2016 - Sunday, April 10th, 2016, 12:15pm-1pm

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

Susan Billy, a tribal member of the Hopland Band of Pomo Indians, a founding member of the California Indian Basketweaver’s Association, and one of few remaining artists practicing traditional Pomo basket weaving, offers insights into this native art form. Susan will share examples of baskets from her personal collection, explaining the traditional process and answering your questions, and she will speak about the Pomo baskets on view in Architecture of Life.

Part of the Architecture of Life series at the BAMPFA.

Gallery talks are included with BAMPFA admission.

Equinox Flower (Yasujiro Ozu, Japan, 1958)

Wednesday, April 13th, 2016 - Wednesday, April 13th, 2016, 3:10PM

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

Special admission applies, see site for details.

Lecture/screening class (3 hours).
Lecture by Marilyn Fabe.

Equinox Flower is about a successful businessman and his attempts to cope with a daughter (Kinuyo Tanaka) who defies an arranged marriage and runs off with a pianist. Ozu's sympathy is never with one character over another; therefore ours cannot be either. Perhaps this is what makes his films, for all their designed tranquility, wrenching. Russell Merritt writes, "Ozu was one of the great precisionists (and) the exactness of Equinox Flower (his first color film) is apparent everywhere . . . His fastidiousness is not just an assertion about the resources of the movies. It is also an idea about life." Nathaniel Dorsky notes, "Often the most intimate and poignant dialogue between two characters in an Ozu film is that between two women. In Equinox Flower, Ozu offers a progression of shots and cuts during a discussion between two women which dismantles time and space. There is no temporal reality; as a viewer you begin to float, you start to cry."

Part of In Focus: Japanese Film Classics at the BAMPFA.

Free gallery admission with same-day film ticket!

Suitcase of Love and Shame (Jane Gillooly, United States, 2013)

Wednesday, April 13th, 2016 - Wednesday, April 13th, 2016, 7PM

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

Filmmaker Jane Gillooly purchased a suitcase on eBay filled with a collection of reel-to-reel tapes, dating to the early 1960s, of audio letters sent back and forth between a Midwestern married man and his lover. Using this new technology, they recorded the intimate details of their affair, from the office to the bedroom, the mundane to the erotic. Armed with these compelling exchanges but no corresponding photographs, Gillooly set about reconstructing their story using minimal, evocative images. As we eavesdrop on secrets from fifty years ago, for Gillooly, “a lot of what you’re seeing is your own imagination.”

Part of the Documentary Voices 2016 series at the BAMPFA.

Free gallery admission with same-day film ticket!

Meara O'Reilly: Alternative Music Notation and Perception

Thursday, April 14th, 2016 - Thursday, April 14th, 2016, 6PM - 8PM

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

Join LA-based sound artist and educator Meara O’Reilly for a workshop and presentation on alternative modes of music notation. Together we will consider the visual language of music composition as a blueprint for how we communicate the organization of sound. What elements of music are missing when we try to write it down? How does that written document differ from how we actually perceive the finished product?

"Traditional Western music notation is very good at visualizing certain basic aspects of music, for example using vertical height to signify pitch. Rhythm is traditionally notated horizontally, from left to right, over time. However, when a repeating rhythmic pattern is instead represented as points on a circle, it immediately allows us to see aspects of its overall symmetry and evenness that we couldn't before. Just as you can easily differentiate a triangle from a square, you can also see these qualities in a rhythm. We can then make subtle compositional choices that play out in unexpected ways, or apply different systems to creating the patterns in the first place.

What is written for musicians to play and what we actually hear can often differ, both subtly and drastically. Many new patterns can be discovered simply by looking at the parts of a piece of music in a different way.

In this session we will explore how both what we hear and compose can be shaped by the notation that we use to document it.” —Meara O’Reilly


Workshops are included with BAMPFA admission.

Chelsea Specht on Karl Blossfeldt’s Botanical Photographs

Friday, April 15th, 2016 - Friday, April 15th, 2016, 12:15pm-1pm

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

Chelsea Specht is an associate professor in the Departments of Plant and Microbial Biology and Integrative Biology, as well as the curator of monocots for the Jepson and University Herbaria. Her research group has developed around the central theme of understanding the evolution of form and function in plants. Specht will add a scientific perspective to Karl Blossfeldt’s photographs of plant forms taken at the turn of the twentieth century.

Part of the Perspectives on the Architecture of Life series at the BAMPFA.

Lunchtime talks are free with BAMPFA admission.

The Life of Oharu (Kenji Mizoguchi Japan, 1952)

Wednesday, April 20th, 2016 - Wednesday, April 20th, 2016, 3:10PM

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

Special admission applies, see site for details.

Lecture/screening class (3 hours).
Lecture by Alan Tansman, Director of the Doreen B. Townsend Center for the Humanities at UC Berkeley.

Mizoguchi considered The Life of Oharu his masterpiece, and critics have placed it among the greatest films of all time. Based on a seventeenth-century novel by Saikaku, The Woman Who Loved Love, it chronicles the decline of a beautiful court lady who is exiled, along with her family, for having loved a page. Sold by her father as a courtesan, she is gradually stripped of social respectability until she is reduced to prostitution and beggary. Mizoguchi was said to have aestheticized women’s suffering (his heroines lack the disillusionment of Naruse’s, the serenity of Ozu’s). The same cannot be said for the great actress Kinuyo Tanaka, Mizoguchi’s muse, however. Through all of Oharu’s degradations and transformations, Tanaka is the wick in the candle, keeping an epic tale of a woman being punished for her sexuality—right up until the last “incident in my lost life”—painfully on topic.

Part of In Focus: Japanese Film Classics at the BAMPFA.

Free gallery admission with same-day film ticket!

Full: Invent

Thursday, April 21st, 2016 - Thursday, April 21st, 2016, 7PM - 9PM

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

An encounter with homemade and experimental instruments. Composer and instrument builder Paul Dresher brings his “omnivorous sensibility” (San Francisco Chronicle) to bear on works for his Quadrachord, joined by innovative percussionist Joel Davel on his Marimba Lumina. In addition, Edward Schocker performs on his own updated version of the glass harmonica, and multi-instrumentalist Laura Inserra creates a rich tapestry for the ears with instruments from around the world.

Plus explore the exhibition galleries and discover simultaneous performances throughout the building.

Full is included with BAMPFA admission. Please note, seating is very limited.

Sugata Ray on Ganesh Haloi's Gauches

Friday, April 22nd, 2016 - Friday, April 22nd, 2016, 12:15pm-1pm

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

Sugata Ray is assistant professor of South Asian art and architecture. His research focuses on the intersections between early modern and colonial artistic practices and transterritorial ecologies, climate histories, and the natural environment in South Asia. These interests inflect Ray’s exploration of the work of twentieth-century Indian artist Haloi, whose abstractions resonate with intimations of landscapes and historic artistic sites, including the Buddhist murals of Ajanta.

Part of the Perspectives on the Architecture of Life series at the BAMPFA.

Lunchtime talks are included with BAMPFA admission.

Yojimbo (Akira Kurosawa Japan, 1961)

Wednesday, April 27th, 2016 - Wednesday, April 27th, 2016, 3:10PM

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

Special admission applies, see site for details.

Lecture/screening class (3 hours).
Lecture by Susan Oxtoby, BAMPFA Senior film curator.

In one of his best-known roles, Toshiro Mifune plays the boisterous, bullying, amoral ronin(masterless samurai) who calls himself simply Sanjuro (“Thirty Years Old”). When Sanjuro wanders into a town terrorized by an ongoing war between two factions, he decides to make a fistful of ryo—and have a little fun—by cleaning up the place. Hiring himself first to one group, then the other, he eventually encourages them to kill each other off. Alluding to Japan’s own “gold rush” in the passing from feudal to capitalist society, Yojimbo was inspired by the American Western and combines its best elements—a remarkable authenticity, finely drawn characters, brilliant comedy, superb editing, and exquisite widescreen cinematography (by Kazuo Miyagawa). Kurosawa makes extensive and surprising use of the telephoto lens, so that the most violent swordfights take on a rare intimacy, and the heroic/antiheroic figure of Sanjuro seems to expand absurdly to epic proportions.

Part of In Focus: Japanese Film Classics at the BAMPFA.

Free gallery admission with same-day film ticket!

Thomas Laqueur on Gustave Caillebotte's Le Pont de L'Europe

Friday, April 29th, 2016 - Friday, April 29th, 2016, 12:15pm-1pm

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

Thomas Laqueur teaches European cultural history at UC Berkeley; his latest book is The Work of the Dead: A Cultural History of Mortal Remains. Laqueur is beginning work on a book about what dogs represent in Western art and he has many intriguing things to say about the eye-catching dog in the foreground of Gustave Caillebotte’s 1876 masterpiece, Le Pont de l’Europe.

Part of the Perspectives on the Architecture of Life series at BAMPFA.

Lunchtime talks are free with BAMPFA admission.

When A Woman Ascends the Stairs (Mikio Naruse Japan, 1960) with Lecture

Wednesday, May 4th, 2016 - Wednesday, May 4th, 2016, 3:10PM

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

Special admission applies, see site for details.

Lecture/screening class (3 hours).
Lecture by Professor Miryam Sas.

Hideko Takamine portrays the consummate Naruse heroine: high-minded, determined, and out of her element in a sordid world. Here it is the back-street bars of Tokyo's Ginza district, which Naruse re-creates in all its busy detail and nighttime poetry. Keiko is a mama-san, or bar hostess, a modern, lower-scale incarnation of the geisha. A widow at thirty, and exploited by her selfish family, she realizes that she must either remarry or strike out on her own in the face of furious competition from othermama-sans. A devastating courtship with a longtime customer only reveals the true vulnerability of Keiko's position. As she prepares to climb the stairs to her customers once again, in a haunting final scene, she expresses the sad litany of her life: "Then it gets dark . . . I hate to climb the stairs. But once I'm up, I trust to luck."

Part of In Focus: Japanese Film Classics at the BAMPFA.

Free gallery admission with same-day film ticket!

Branded to Kill (Seijun Suzuki, Japan, 1967) with Lecture

Wednesday, May 11th, 2016 - Wednesday, May 11th, 2016, 3:10PM

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

Special admission applies, see site for details.

Lecture/screening class (3 hours).
Lecture by Tom Vic, Curator of film at the Freer and Sackler Galleries, Smithsonian Institution.

This fractured film noir is the final provocation that got Seijun Suzuki fired from Nikkatsu Studios, simultaneously making him a counterculture hero and putting him out of work for a decade. An anarchic send-up of B movie clichés, it stars Jo Shishido as an assassin who gets turned on by the smell of cooking rice, and whose failed attempt to kill a victim (a butterfly lands on his gun) turns him into a target himself. Perhaps Suzuki’s most famous film, it has been cited as an influence by filmmakers such as Quentin Tarantino, Jim Jarmusch, Park Chan-wook, and John Woo.

Part of In Focus: The Role of Film Archives at the BAMPFA.

Free gallery admission with same-day film ticket!



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