Upcoming Events


Annual Purchase Award

Monday, November 1st, 2010 - Sunday, November 1st, 2015, 9-5 Monday-Friday

Emeryville City Hall
1333 Park Blvd.

In Emeryville

The lobby of City Hall in Emeryville serves as an emerging gallery of local artworks.  Since 2005, the City has acquired one work which was selected from the Annual Emeryville Celebration of the Arts Exhibit held each October.  The juried exhibit showcases the work of the many professional artists who live and work here.  With a long tradition of artists cooperative housing, Emeryville is home to large number of artists, in fact, Emeryville may boast one of the most dense artists populations per capita in the Bay Region.  Past Purchase Award acquisitions include paintings by Canan Tolon and Michael Murphy, textile by Ana Lisa Hedstrom, light sculpture by Therese Lahaie and a ceramic wall hanging by Cuong Ta.  All the works as well as installations in and around City Hall such as Roger Berry's Solar Rose can be viewed suring normal business hours when City Hall is open to the public.  Please visit soon!


Hofmann by Hofmann

Wednesday, July 2nd, 2014 - Sunday, December 21st, 2014, 11:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
2626 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

In 1960 Hans Hofmann (1880–1966) described the just-completed painting Summer Bliss as one of his finest. At the suggestion of Erle Loran, then chair of the UC Berkeley Art Department, Hofmann offered Summer Bliss to the University in honor of professor Worth Ryder, who had passed away earlier that year. Ryder, who like Loran had studied with Hofmann years earlier in Germany, had invited Hofmann to teach at Berkeley in 1930, initiating what Hofmann later identified as his “start in America as a teacher and artist.”1

Three years later, Hofmann made another gift to the University—nearly fifty paintings representing the highest artistic achievement of his career, plus a pledge of $250,000 in support of the burgeoning University Art Museum (now BAM/PFA). At Hofmann’s request, Erle Loran was closely involved in choosing the paintings for this profoundly generous gift, selecting from among significant older works as well the strongest examples of his later practice. Although Hofmann died before the entire group was finalized, the BAM/PFA Hofmann collection, recognized as the world’s most extensive museum collection of his work, embodies the artist’s desire for it to be both excellent and comprehensive.

As we prepare to move to our new building in downtown Berkeley, it seems fitting to revisit the enduring vitality and generosity of Hofmann’s extraordinary gift. Hofmann by Hofmann focuses on the first paintings selected personally by Hofmann for BAM/PFA. Fantasia (1943), one of the earliest works, straddles a cusp between Surrealism and Abstract Expressionism while also anticipating the compositional logic and push-pull spatial dynamics of his signature color plane works of the 1950s and 1960s, such as Summer Bliss. In Nocturnal Splendor (1963) and Gloriamundi (1963), two of the later canvases, Hofmann employs contrasting colors and the arrangement of shapes into expanding and contracting forces (push-pull) to create the experience of three-dimensional space. “Space,”

Looking Intently: The James Cahill Legacy

Wednesday, July 23rd, 2014 - Sunday, December 21st, 2014, 11:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
2626 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

The late James Cahill, Professor Emeritus at UC Berkeley, was known as a brilliant scholar, exceptional teacher and writer, and extraordinary connoisseur and collector of Chinese and Japanese paintings. He began collecting in the mid-1950s as a Fulbright Scholar in Japan, where he encountered significantly undervalued Chinese paintings of the Ming and Qing periods. At the time few collectors were interested in these later paintings and fewer still understood their inherent value. But Cahill recognized their importance and so began a lifelong pursuit of fine paintings. His collection became known by his studio name, Ching Yuan Chai, given to him by his own teacher, Shimada Shujiro. As Cahill wrote, “It could be either Studio of Someone Looking into the Yuan (as I was for my dissertation) or, more prestigiously, Someone Gazing into the Abstruse.” Today paintings associated with that studio name are among the treasures that make up the core of the BAM/PFA Chinese painting collection. In fond memory of James Cahill (1926–2014), we present this selection from the collection in tribute to his tremendous generosity and commitment to Berkeley and to BAM/PFA.

Cahill, unlike some of his contemporaries as well as historic Chinese collectors, did not mark with a seal or inscription the paintings in his collection. Rather, he made his mark by donating—and encouraging others to donate—exceptionally fine paintings to BAM/PFA. This small exhibition presents just a handful of works, but they demonstrate the unparalleled range of Cahill’s collecting interests, from Summer Trees Casting Shade, a large decorative painting by Dai Jin (1388–1462), to the quietly cerebral The Zhiping Temple by Wen Zhengming (1470–1559).

Cahill frequently used the collection for teaching, engaging students in dialogue about brushwork, connoisseurship, authenticity, and condition, and looking intently at real works of art, a tradition that continues today.


Looking Intently: The James Cahill Legacy is

John Zurier / MATRIX 255

Friday, September 12th, 2014 - Sunday, December 21st, 2014, Wednesday through Sunday, 11am - 5pm

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
2626 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Berkeley-based artist John Zurier (b. 1956) paints abstract, luminous canvases with hand-mixed pigments that range from subtle, muted earth tones to vibrant, saturated hues. He uses a wide range of brushwork and surface treatments to draw attention to the varied textures of the canvas—often applying distemper (a tempera paint made with dry pigments in animal glue) in thin brushy layers—to capture qualities of light and the changing effects of the atmosphere. He builds compositions that are both simple and involved, paying close attention to all aspects of a painting’s construction, including the differences between cotton and linen surfaces, the weave of each canvas, and the individual properties of tempera versus oil paint. Informed by a wide range of references—Abstract Expressionism, Italian Renaissance painting, Minimalism, Japanese painting, and poetry—Zurier’s work transcends the mundane to enter an affective realm. “I’m very interested in how compositional formats and motifs and even incidents in a painting can trigger perceptual responses and associations,” Zurier says.

Born in Santa Monica, Zurier received both his BA and MFA from the University of California, Berkeley. For MATRIX 255, his first solo exhibition in a museum, Zurier debuts a new body of paintings and watercolors inspired by Iceland, where he has been traveling, teaching, and painting since 2011. Zurier’s abstractions evoke the ice, fog, wind, water, and light of the Icelandic landscape, while also tapping into more timeless, contemplative states. Icy pale blue tones predominate, revealing the infinite range of the hue, as each composition strikes a unique, sensitive chord.

American Wonder: Folk Art from the Collection

Wednesday, October 1st, 2014 - Sunday, December 21st, 2014, Wednesday through Sunday, 11am - 5pm

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
2626 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

American Wonder: Folk Art from the Collection captures our burgeoning nation during a time of enormous change, from the Declaration of Independence in 1776 to the onset of the Civil War in 1861. The exhibition includes approximately fifty portraits, landscapes, commemorative mourning pictures, weather vanes, and decorative sculptures from the BAM/PFA collection. This distinguished collection—one of the finest of American folk art in California—is due to the generosity of W.B. Carnochan and N.C. Edebo.

In the years just following the Revolutionary War, many newly minted Americans desired painted portraits for their homes in order to identify individuals, establish family legacy, and demonstrate personal and/or civic achievement. Artists usually chose to portray their subjects in conventional poses, with the greatest emphasis placed on individual facial features. Clothing and surroundings were often simple and stylized, but might include details that would have been understood at the time as signs of social status or phase of life.

The exhibition also includes a number of landscapes, ranging from pastoral scenes to views of industrial progress. View of Providence, Rhode Island, created in the mid-1820s by an unidentified artist, functions as a portrait; the coastal city is portrayed on the brink of transition from pioneer village to bustling center of commerce. With remarkable beauty and formal simplicity, the works of art in American Wonder evoke the vivid presentness of their subjects and makers.

Joseph Holtzman / MATRIX 256

Friday, October 17th, 2014 - Sunday, December 21st, 2014, Wednesday through Sunday, 11am - 5pm

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
2626 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Joseph Holtzman’s unusual artistic sensibility evolved from his close study of historical painting and his connoisseurship of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century decorative arts. His themes and motifs draw on these diverse sources as well as allude to family and friends, cultural personalities, historical figures, and literary characters. Balancing his wide-ranging references is an intensely sensual connection to paint and surface.

Holtzman (b. 1957) is highly attentive to the unique qualities of color and texture that can be expressed through the medium of paint on various grounds. His palette is fantastically rich and varied and he achieves remarkable chromatic and tonal effects by exploiting not only the transparency of the oil medium but also the unusual capacity of marble—his favorite surface—to absorb and reflect light. He pays as much attention to the tiniest details of the paintings as he does to their overall compositions. To contemplate Holtzman’s paintings is to become immersed—indeed, nearly lost—in a strange yet beautiful universe.

Many of Holtzman’s paintings are portraits though their subjects may only emerge for him in the process of painting: Frieda (Holtzman’s mother), Monsieur de Charlus (the dissolute aristocrat in Proust’s In Search of Lost Time), Mary Todd Lincoln (“a driven decorator,” according to Holtzman), the composer Stephen Sondheim, and Holtzman’s husband, Carl Skoggard. These subjects are evoked less through accurate depictions of their bodies and faces than through settings and related objects that, like saintly “attributes,” convey symbolic meaning.

Through his highly personal and inventive engagement with painting, Holtzman has invested new life into this versatile medium while nodding to the admired forebears of his, and our, cultural past.

Robots and Storetry

Saturday, November 1st, 2014 - Sunday, December 14th, 2014, Opening 6 to 9pm

The Compound Gallery
1167 65th Ave

In Oakland

For 25 years, Kevin Bradley has been scouring old barns and basements east of the Mississippi for these rare fonts and types from the 1800s and 1900s. He wants to bring to life the way the world communicated hundreds of years ago, only in a modern way — much like how modern folk musicians keep old songs alive, bringing them to contemporary listeners in new forms and textures. Bradley has even developed his own type of poetry called Storetry — a form of poetry/stories turned into posters. But at the most basic level, he’s a typographer — a last craftsman in a dying profession. He has a series of original images — robots, dinosaurs, Godzilla. Each of these images is made with letters, which you can see when you look up close. He’s experimenting every day with the form. “It’s a repository of the real stuff,” says Bradley.

Visual Language

Friday, November 7th, 2014 - Saturday, December 27th, 2014, 6-9

SLATE contemporary
473 25th St.

In Oakland

SLATE's latest show, Visual Language, displays artists who incorporate written text within their compositions. The show includes six local artists: Daniella Woolf, Tricia Rissmann, Lucky Rapp, Catherine Courtenaye, Blair Bradshaw, and Silvia Poloto.

Opening reception for Here: Berkeley Art Center Artists Annual Exhibition

Saturday, November 8th, 2014 - Sunday, December 14th, 2014, 5-8 pm

Berkeley Art Center
1275 Walnut St, Berkeley, CA 94709

In Berkeley

Here: Berkeley Art Center Artists Annual Exhibition

Exhibition dates: November 8 – December 14, 2014
Opening Reception: Saturday, November 8, 5-8pm

Part 1 of Berkeley Art Center’s Artists Annual includes work in all media submitted by its members. It is presented salon-style just in time for the holidays in the center’s beautiful gallery space nestled in North Berkeley’s Live Oak Park. Featuring a wide array of perspectives and varied levels of accomplishment, this exhibition celebrates the diversity and vibrancy of our cultural community. This year, members who participate in the Artists Annual part 1 will also have a special opportunity to be considered for a smaller group exhibition in part 2. Join us for the opening reception on Saturday, November 8, 5-8pm. Free and open to the public.


Here: The 2014 BAC Artists Annual

Saturday, November 15th, 2014 - Sunday, December 14th, 2014, 5-8pm

Berkeley Art Center
1275 WALNUT ST

In Berkeley

It’s that time of year again. Berkeley Art Center presents, Here: The 2014 BAC Artists Annual, an exhibition in two parts. Here: Part I is a non-juried presentation, followed by Here: Part II, curated by Aimee Friberg, director of CULT Exhibitions in San Francisco. Friberg will select outstanding artists from Part I of the exhibition who will then be invited to showcase a larger body of work in Part II. This unique exhibition experience will allow new perspectives on the broad and deep BAC artist communities.


Here: The 2014 BAC Artists Annual Part I
Opening Reception: Saturday, November 15, 5-8pm
Exhibition Dates: November 15- December 14

Holiday Sale
A Celebration of Here: BAC Artist Annual
Saturday, December 6, 11am-5pm

Meet the Director Night

Wednesday, December 10, 5-7pm | FREE

Let's Talk

Introducing Meet the Director nights at BAC: a quarterly series of informal gatherings. Still in her first year as BAC executive director, Aimee Le Duc invites members of the community to visit the center and discuss the changes happening at BAC. Free and open to the public.

I Am Cuba (Mikhail Kalatozov; Cuba/USSR, 1964)

Saturday, November 29th, 2014 - Saturday, November 29th, 2014, 5:30pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Here is an extraordinary example of “pure” cinema in the service of politics. “A true film maudit. Impossible to see in Cuba (where it was called I Am NOT Cuba), and scorned in Russia as agitprop kitsch, I Am Cuba was made in 1962 as an act of Soviet-Cuban friendship. Yevgeny Yevtushenko gets credit for the film’s poetic structure—a loose series of choreographed tableaux in praise of the revolutionary spirit. It is also a deliriously one-of-a-kind movie, wildly schizophrenic in its bizarre mix of Slavic solemnity and Latin sensuality” (Tom Luddy, Telluride Film Festival). “The most brilliant Soviet film since the 1920s. Kalatozov and cinematographer Sergei Urusevsky have . . . realized Eisenstein’s dream: an epic of the revolutionary struggle of the oppressed Latin American masses, using visual images and nearly no dialogue. (They) have used their ‘emotional camera’ to an extent which has to be seen to be believed, using handheld camera, wide-angle lenses, oddly tilted angles . . . and elaborate crane shots” (Steven P. Hill, Film Quarterly).

• Written by Yevgeny Yevtushenko, Enriqué Pineda Barnet. Photographed by Sergei Urusevsky. With Luz María Collazo, Jean Bouise, Sergio Corrieri, José Gallardo. (138 mins, In Spanish with Russian voiceover, B&W, 35mm, BAM/PFA Collection, permission Milestone)

Hail Mary (Jean-Luc Godard; France, 1985)

Saturday, November 29th, 2014 - Saturday, November 29th, 2014, 8:15pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

New 35mm Print!
"Somehow I think we need faith, or I need faith, or I’m lacking in faith. Therefore maybe I needed a story which is bigger than myself." (Godard). Condemned even before its opening, Hail Mary is ironically a beautiful cinematic hymn. "Godard evokes the serious through a comic mode, enticing solemnity with a chained camera, a steady, austere procession of beautiful paintings (images) seeking the soul in faces, reflections; a woman who must lend herself to no one, who is condemned from seeing love, her desire (in flesh), and discovers, perhaps as Vivre sa vie's Nana did in her tears, that the soul is not imprisoned in the body, but the body within a soul" (Ryan DeRosa).

• Written by Godard. Photographed by Jean-Bernard Ménoud. With Myriem Roussel, Thierry Rode, Philippe Lacoste, Juliette Binoche. (103 mins, In French with English subtitles, Color, 35mm, From Cohen Film Collection)

Lesson Study: Dance in Middle School

Tuesday, December 2nd, 2014 - Sunday, November 2nd, 2014, 4:30-6:00

Luna Dance Institute
605 Addison St.

In Berkeley

Join a cohort of peers as we address the delights and dilemmas of dance in Middle School. This is an opportunity for empathy, energizing and idea-sharing. Cash donations accepted.

Ai Weiwei’s Appeal ¥ 15,220,910.50 (Ai Weiwei; China, 2014)

Wednesday, December 3rd, 2014 - Wednesday, December 3rd, 2014, 7:00pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Ai Weiwei once said,“Everything is art. Everything is politics.” With his Appeal ¥15,220,910.50, it is clear that in China governmental politics are used to smother meaningful art. Made directly by Ai and his studio confederates, this meticulous portrait differs from the recent The Fake Case in that it is more concerned with the ham-fisted maneuvering of the Chinese judicial system than honoring this renowned dissident. The eponymous “appeal” and its large accompanying sum refer to the fabricated tax evasion charges against Ai and the imposed fine of some $2.5 million. Six separate cinematographers from Ai’s studio are credited on the film, allowing for thorough coverage of Ai’s arrest at the Beijing Airport, incarceration for eighty-one days, and subsequent Kafkaesque tangling with the Taxation Bureau. The effect of this exhaustive look at Chinese jurisprudence is that you can (vicariously) experience the mundane but incremental weight of tangling with the state. "In China we're all suspects,” says Ai Weiwei. “It's just that we don't know what the charges are." We are all Weiwei.

• Photographed by Zhao Zhao, Li Dongxu, Guo Ke, Xia Xing, Xue Yutao, Li Jie. (128 mins, In Mandarin with English subtitles, Color, Digital, From Ai Weiwei Studio)

High Tech, Low Life (Stephen T. Maing; China/US, 2012)

Thursday, December 4th, 2014 - Thursday, December 4th, 2014, 7:00pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

The Great Firewall of China is almost as formidable as the one of stone and mortar, but not quite. Here and there, the very complexity of Internet oversight allows for the unintentional dispersal of information. And there is a waiting audience for such renegade info as a counter to the state’s official cleansing of news in favor of social stability. High Tech, Low Life follows two of China’s first “citizen reporters” as they roam the country reporting on social and economic debacles that have been routinely suppressed by official outlets. Equipped with laptops, cell phones, and digital cameras, each is a one-man, mobile news station circulating the unbridled news through blogs and other postings. The two troublemakers are “Tiger Temple,” known as China’s first citizen reporter after he rashly reported on a local murder, and “Zola” who is more tabloid to T.T.’s activist bent. A folk hero of sorts, Tiger Temple, really fifty-seven-year-old Zhang Shihe, takes to the countryside on his bike, documenting rural pollution and other felonious deeds. Zhou Shuguang, aka Zola, a twenty-seven--year-old vegetable vendor, seeks celebrity as a result of his under-the-radar reporting. Regardless of motive, both indie reporters implicitly advocate free speech, a dangerous position given governmental censorship. They are hounded by security forces and at times literally escorted out of towns before trouble stirs. An optimist, Tiger Temple declared, "last year we could talk about X but not about Y. Now this year we can talk about Y, and next year we'll be able to talk about Z." That leaves only twenty-three other letters censored.

• Photographed by Maing. (87 mins, In Mandarin with English subtitles, Color, Digital, From Mud Horse Pictures)

CHOREOFUND 3

Thursday, December 4th, 2014 - Thursday, December 4th, 2014, 7pm- 9pm

Luna Dance Institute
605 Addison St.

In Berkeley

CHOREFUND is a biannual opportunity for the community to support homegrown dance-making. The event is similar to a game of chance. 30 community members contribute $40 cash each to witness 6 different choreographers give short pitches and perform excerpts of their work. The audience gets to see a variety of styles and ideas at all stages of completion, and witness the creative process in most immediate form. At the end of the night, each person votes on who takes home the entire $1200. To be a contributing audience member please email preedy@lunadanceinstitute.org or call 510-883-1118.

L@TE: Terry Riley

Friday, December 5th, 2014 - Friday, December 5th, 2014, 7:30pm

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
2626 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Five years ago, Terry Riley played at our very first L@TE event, and we are elated to have him return to close out the series. Pioneer of the minimalist aesthetic, seminal influence on the Velvet Underground and Sonic Youth, devotee of Hindustani classical music as well as jazz, Riley remains one of the most dynamic compositional voices of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. He will joined by his son, guitarist and composer Gyan Riley. Don’t miss your last chance to hear his sublime music reverberate through our vast architecture.

Galleries will remain open until 10:30 p.m. for this special event. A limited number of chairs will be available; please bring a pillow to make yourself comfortable on the gallery floor, or listen from the upper gallery balconies during the performance.

Arts of Point Richmond Arts & Crafts Holiday Faire

Saturday, December 6th, 2014 - Saturday, December 6th, 2014, 11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Pt. Richmond Community Center
139 Washington St.

In Richmond

Come to Point Richmond on Saturday, Dec. 6, and find your holiday gifts.

Arts of Point Richmond is holding its annual Holiday Arts & Crafts Faire with an International theme on Sat., Dec. 6 from 11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Local artists will be exhibiting and selling their art, a raffle will be held at 3 pm, and there will be music by Joe Bagley. Join us for this special holiday event in the Pt. Richmond Community Center, 139 Washington Ave.

While you are in Pt. Richmond., there are several arts establishments that are definitely worth visiting.

• Ali Amaro /Art, Jewelry & Objects is on 41 Washington Ave, is a gallery, design studio, and boutique.
• Next door at 39 Washington Ave. is “Emporium of Cool Stuff", an antiques consignment shop. You will find period furniture, china, silver, textiles, paintings, and all the collectible kitsch and curios the heart could desire.
• Across the street is “Maison d'Boheme”, a colorful boutique that features Indonesian and Indian-inspired custom furniture, plus bohemian home goods, and accessories.
• Next door to “Maison d'Boheme” is Steve Hurst's clock-making studio and creative space, a gallery of original wall clocks, mantel clocks, table clocks and one of a kind clocks, made from recycled items. www.stevenartclocks.com.
• On 111 W. Richmond Ave, is “Guillermina Asian Arts and Antiques”, where you will find Japanese and Asian antiques, folk arts, gifts, jewelry and art objects

If all this shopping makes you hungry, there are many restaurants, a deli, and a coffee shop on Washington Ave. and more on Richmond Ave. to choose from. Do come by and visit us.



Oakland Interfaith Gospel Choir's 29th Annual Holiday Concert

Saturday, December 6th, 2014 - Saturday, December 6th, 2014, 12/6/14, 7:00 PM - 9:30 PM

Paramount Theatre
2025 Broadway

In Oakland

The Oakland Interfaith Gospel Choir (OIGC) is warming up for its 29th Annual Holiday Concert at the historic Paramount Theatre on Saturday, December 6th. This year, OIGC will be joined by Stellar Award winner and gospel great Ms. Kim Burrell, beatbox artist Kid Beyond, the ever-growing Oakland Interfaith Community Choir, Oakland Interfaith Youth Choir, and liturgical dancers Imani Ya Watume.

The choir's series of holiday concerts, beginning with the Paramount show, have been called "a cherished holiday tradition in the Bay Area, every bit as important as The Nutcracker and A Christmas Carol." For many, it's not the holiday season until the Bay Area's favorite gospel choir performs at the Paramount.

KIM BURRELL
Grammy-nominated, NAACP, Dove, and Stellar Award recipient Kim Burrell is one of the world's most sought-after artists in the music industry today. Burrell is currently serving her fourth season as mentor for BET's Sunday Best; as host of Real Talk with Kim Burrell; writing a book entitled Let Freedom Sing; working in the studio on her sixth solo project; and as the lead actress in biopics featuring jazz and gospel artists of our time.

KID BEYOND
This pioneering singer, beatboxer and live looper has riveted hundreds of thousands of viewers around the world. A longtime teacher at Jazz Camp West and the California Jazz Conservatory, Kid Beyond combines impeccable chops with cutting-edge creativity. He has performed alongside such legendary performers as Ray Charles and James Brown.

HALF-N-HALF ASL INTERPRETATION
American Sign Language (ASL) interpreters Sherry Hicks and Michael Velez of Half-N-Half (www.half-n-half.com) will be on hand for their fourth turn providing sign translation for the show. Sherry and Michael are Children of Deaf Adults (CODA) performers that collaborate and tour around the world. This dynamic duo delights audiences with their original multimedia ASL performances combining music and storytelling.

Presented by Oakland Interfaith Gospel Choir.

$12-$42.

Flight of the Sparrows (Teimur Babluani; USSR, 1980)

Saturday, December 6th, 2014 - Saturday, December 6th, 2014, 6:00pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

The allegorical Flight of the Sparrows begins aboard a crowded third-class passenger train traveling through Soviet Georgia at night. An eccentric cast of characters passes the time chatting and occasionally arguing. Tensions erupt when a burly man wearing a leather jacket, who, against type, has a pet sparrow tucked inside the pocket closest to his chest, and another man, who is well-dressed, well-educated, and claims to have traveled the world, engage in a fistfight. The expert cinematography accentuates the close quarters of the train cabin, and then the action shifts to a totally different setting.

• Written by Babluani. Photographed by Victor Andrievsky. With Alguja Burduli, Teimuraz Bichiashvili, Rezo Esadze, Amiran Amiransvili. (60 mins, In Georgian with English subtitles, B&W, ’Scope, 35mm, From MoMA)

Un-Rapping O'Neill

Saturday, December 6th, 2014 - Saturday, December 6th, 2014, 7:00pm

East Bay Center for the Performing Arts
339 11th Street

In Richmond

Richmond High School students, in collaboration with East Bay Center for the Performing Arts, present Un-Rapping O'Neill, a modern adaptation of Pulitzer prize-winning playwright Eugene O'Neill's Long Day's Journey into Night.

In Un-Rapping O'Neill, students from Richmond High School unravel the themes of isolation, addiction, and forgiveness from O'Neill's masterpiece and connect these to the challenges and anxieties of communities in Richmond, CA. Director Eugenia Ives explores these connections in a production that brings new poetic energy to the classic play by weaving beat boxing, rap, and break dancing into the storytelling.

Students from East Bay Center for the Performing Arts' Young Artists Diploma Program will open the event with a short musical performance.

When: December 6th, 7pm
Where: East Bay Center for the Performing Arts, 339 11th Street, Richmond, CA 94801
Tickets: Admission is free, advance reservations are strongly advised and are available here: http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/961143.

Information: Visit www.eastbaycenter.org or call 510-221-6353

This production was made possible through the generous support of the National Park Foundation. The Foundation offers students opportunities to explore the relevance of national parks, such as Tao House, Eugene O'Neill's residency in Danville, CA.

Dance in Early Childhood & Parent/Child Relationship Based Dance

Saturday, December 6th, 2014 - Saturday, December 6th, 2014, 9:30-4:30

Luna Dance Institute
605 Addison St.

In Berkeley

This full-day workshop explores the use of dance and movement in early childhood and family settings. Learn how to enhance children's natural ability to learn through play & exploration, as well as relationship through movement. Examine how dance activities may further the creative, social, language and cognitive capacities of young children, as they illuminate developmental milestones of the very young child. Brain research and somatic systems are introduced. No pre-requisite. $150 Contact jperena@lunadanceinstitute.org to register.

Alexander String Quartet and Robert Greenberg, host and lecturer

Saturday, December 6th, 2014 - Wednesday, December 24th, 2014, December 6, 13, 20 and 24, 2014, 10 am-12 noon

St. John's Presbyterian Church, Berkeley
2727 College Avenue

In Berkeley

SATURDAY MORNINGS IN BERKELEY - MOZART IN VIENNA

Brimming with music and information and packed with history and humor, this popular series has brought together the award-winning Alexander String Quartet and music historian Robert Greenberg for more than two decades. Better than brunch and more entertaining than the morning paper, these concerts present performances of complete works surrounded by illuminating talks about the history and times of their composers. As one long-time audience member puts it, "this is the perfect start to a great weekend!"

In 1781, the 25 year-old Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart moved to Vienna, to freelance and pursue fame and fortune in the capital city of German music. A few months later, he met and played in a pickup string quartet with Joseph Haydn. Inspired by the Haydn quartets he had played, Mozart set out to compose a series of string quartets of his own, quartets that would earn Haydn's respect. In this he succeeded entirely; Mozart's six, so-called "Haydn" quartets did not just win Haydn's praise but raised the string quartet bar to an altogether new level of artistry, virtuosity, and compositional complexity.

This season will also feature Mozart's two extraordinary Piano Quartets of 1785-1786, works that virtually created the genre of "piano quartet."

Program 1: December 6
Quartet No. 14 in G Major, K. 387
Quartet No. 15 in D minor, K. 421

Program 2: December 13
Quartet No. 16 in E-flat Major, K. 428
Quartet No. 17 in B flat Major, K. 458 "Hunt"

Program 3: December 20
Quartet No. 18 in A Major, K. 464
Quartet No. 19 in C Major, K. 465 "Dissonance"

Program 4: January 24 with Sarah Cahill, piano
Piano Quartet No. 1 in G minor, K. 478
Piano Quartet No. 2 in E-flat Major, K. 493

Presented by San Francisco Performances - 35th Anniversary Season.

$45 each Saturday of the series.

The Swimmer (Irakli Kvirikadze; USSR, 1984)

Sunday, December 7th, 2014 - Sunday, December 7th, 2014, 4:00pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

The amusing and artfully crafted tale of three generations of long-distance swimmers, told from the perspective of the grandson, Anton Dumbadze. The legendary grandfather, Dumishkan Dumbadze, and his son, Dometi, were each obsessed with the idea of crossing the Black Sea from Batumi to Poti, double the distance of the English Channel! Filled with alluring glimpses of Georgian folklore, the film also presents a critique of Stalinist purges that is searingly direct. The Swimmer had a fitful history: it was shot in 1981, but postproduction was interrupted before a Georgian version could be completed; a shortened cut was released three years later. 

• Written by Kvirikadze. Photographed by Guram Tugushi. With Gudea Buzduli, Ruslan Mikabezidze, Badur Zuladze. (105 mins, In Georgian with English subtitles, Color, 35mm, BAM/PFA Collection)

Preceded by: 
Kvevri (Irakli Kirikadze, USSR, 1971)
This short transposes Pirandello’s “The Jar” to rural Georgia. Gogia buys a new jug in anticipation of the wine harvest, but his daughter accidentally breaks it, leading to comic complications.
(29 mins, Dubbed in Russian with English electronic titling, B&W, 35mm, BAM/PFA Collection)

Total running time: 134 mins


Fatal Assistance (Raoul Peck; France/Haiti/US/Belgium, 2013)

Sunday, December 7th, 2014 - Sunday, December 7th, 2014, 6:45pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

For seventy-five seconds, Haiti’s capital, Port-au-Prince, shook—when it stopped, several hundred thousand Haitians had died and a million more were left homeless. Quickly following the 2010 quake, representatives from prominent nations, along with a swarm of NGOs, rushed to this devastated island with the promise of massive humanitarian aid. An aid agency, the Interim Haiti Recovery Commission (IHRC), cochaired by Bill Clinton and Haitian Prime Minister Jean-Max Bellerive, was created to orchestrate the overall reconstruction. The promised $11 billion was seen as a hopeful trove to underwrite not just the reconstruction but the reinvention of this crippled nation. And then the spectacle of deliverance arose, with the fanfare of Hollywood celebrities like George Clooney and Angelina Jolie, the contradictory agendas of well-meaning NGOs, and the puffery of the politically inclined aid administrators. When Haitian-born documentarian Raoul Peck arrived in 2011, little had changed: hundreds of thousands remained in temporary housing like the calamitous Camp Corail-Cesselesse, fresh water was scarce, millions of cubic feet of debris still smothered the city, and a miniscule part of the promised funds had been distributed. Schooled in a style of progressive critique, Peck’s exposé gives us an irate perch from which to view the second unfolding disaster, that of the relief effort. Fatal Assistance shows how a lack of trust in the Haitians themselves turned remedies into impositions, often wrongly directed, and how misguided solutions, such as importing water rather than reopening a local bottling plant, became half measures that slowed the recovery. From the hygienic halls of the Recovery Commission to aid workers digging ditches for sanitation, this bold documentary shows us the collateral costs of doing good. Standing on shaky ground, Peck finally asks, “Who will save us from our saviors?”

• Written by Peck. Photographed by Antoine Struyf. (99 mins, In Fren

JLG/JLG: Self Portrait in December (Jean-Luc Godard; France, 1994)

Wednesday, December 10th, 2014 - Wednesday, December 10th, 2014, 7:00pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

JLG/JLG was made the year the enfant terrible turned sixty-four. Twenty-five years earlier Godard declared, "My aesthetic is that of the sniper on the roof"; today his guns are turned toward his own status as a "living legend." JLG/JLG has been described as "an inebriating dialectical diary of words, sounds, images, and landscapes . . . (a) galloping reflection on the filmmaker's rapport with art, nature, politics, philosophy, history, and most of all, cinema." (David Rooney, Variety). It's the kind of list that only Godard could attempt to assimilate, and he does so never leaving the seclusion of his Swiss lake area home. Rather, he delves into it, imbuing a photo of himself as a youth with the qualities of Proust's madeleine, youth that has a sad eye toward death.

• Written by Godard. (60 mins, In French, German, English with English subtitles, Color, 35mm, From Institut Français, permission Gaumont)

Preceded by:
Origins of the 21st Century
Jean-Luc Godard (France, 2000)
With poetic apositeness, these images (from Kubrick, Dreyer, pornography, war reportage, and the nineteenth-century Lumière brothers) act as "rosebud" and Rosetta Stone, as Godard looks at a century vanished but undead in his most concise and heartbreaking film.

(13 mins, Color, Beta SP, BAM/PFA Collection)

Total running time: 73 mins

Budrus (Julia Bacha; Israel/Occupied Palestinian Territories, 2009)

Thursday, December 11th, 2014 - Thursday, December 11th, 2014, 7:00pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

As a youth, Ayed Morrar joined Fatah and was jailed for the first of five times at the age of nineteen. His incarcerations and the anguish of armed resistance had taught him a lesson. When Julia Bacha arrived to begin her ever-timely film, Morrar had become the leader of a nonviolent uprising in Budrus, a West Bank village of 1,500. When the Israeli government decides that the security wall should not just encircle the village itself but literally annex generations-old olive groves, a source of livelihood for many impoverished Palestinians, Morrar saw no solution but unwavering protest. The strength of commitment grows as more and more of the villagers find the courage to resist. But it is the refusal of Morrar’s fifteen-year-old daughter, Iltezam, to be sidelined that turns conviction to victory. When the women join the men in protest along the rocky ‘scape, their boldness is unbreakable. Soon the village’s plight is making international headlines, uniting not only members of Fatah and Hamas under the banner of nonviolence, but also bringing together Israelis, South Africans, and other activists from the global rights movement. Brazilian-born Bacha intercuts interviews with local Palestinians, international observers, and Israeli soldiers to create a complex view of these turbulent times. Like the three thousand olive trees they fought for, the people of Budrus have their roots in ancient soil, but their politics amidst the olive branches.

• Written by Bacha. Photographed by Shai Pollack. (82 mins, In Arabic, Hebrew, English with English subtitles, Color, Digital, From ro*co films)

OakTechRep presents The Living by Anthony Clarvoe

Thursday, December 11th, 2014 - Saturday, December 13th, 2014, Dec 11-13 starting at 7 pm; plus December 13th 2 pm matinee

Oakland Technical High School Auditorium
310 42d Street

In Oakland

Set during the Great Plague that tore through London in 1665, Anthony Clarvoe's The Living explores the motivations and behaviors of a group of Londoners who remained in the city even after the majority of city officials fled. The play focuses on a cast of characters ranging from doctors to clergy to average citizens to city officials as they struggle to make meaning and keep on living during a catastrophic epidemic. Originally written during the AIDS crisis, The Living remains just as relevant today as communities around the world encounter yet another epidemic. OakTechRep's production will feature original puppets designed and fabricated by the Tech Techies and manipulated by the ensemble.

Oak Tech Rep, the award-winning student theatre company of Oakland Technical High School will perform The Living December 11th-13th, with three evening performances at 7 pm and one Saturday matinee at 2pm in the Oakland Tech Auditorium, 310 42nd Street at Broadway in Oakland. General Admission Tickets are $10.00 at the door; $8.00 for OUSD Staff and Students. Due to the serious nature of the play's content, this event is recommended for middle school age and older. The production will be directed by Jessa Moreno with Technical Direction by Casey Fern and Choreography by Ena Dallas.

For more information, contact jessica.moreno@ousd.k12.ca.us or (510) 450-5400.

Presented by OakTechRep.

$8.00 to $10.00.

King Lear (Jean-Luc Godard; US/France, 1987)

Friday, December 12th, 2014 - Friday, December 12th, 2014, 9:00pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Godard’s King Lear, predictably, is not a costume drama set in pre-Christian England. Instead we follow William Shakespeare V (Peter Sellars) as he wanders through a post-Chernobyl world, “a time when movies and art no longer exist and must be reinvented,” trying to reconstruct his ancestor’s play aided and abetted by Herr Doktor Professor Pluggy, played by Jean-Luc Godard himself. The film oscillates between telling the story of its own production and reconstructing Lear as a Mafia chieftain engaged in interminable rows with his daughters in interminable hotel rooms. Brilliant, witty, infuriating, the film testifies, yet again, to Godard’s astonishing engagement with sound and image and, despite all his own protestations, to an engagement with Shakespeare’s text.

• Written by Norman Mailer. Photographed by Sophie Maintigneux. With Peter Sellars, Burgess Meredith, Molly Ringwald, Godard. (90 mins, In French, Russian, Japanese, English with English subtitles, Color, 35mm, From Park Circus)

Lowell Street | Winter Open Studios

Friday, December 12th, 2014 - Saturday, December 13th, 2014, Friday Reception: 7pm - 10pm | Saturday: 12pm - 3pm

Lowell Street Studios
5621 Lowell Street

In Emeryville

Lowell Street Studios presents


Alise Anderson
Kyle Dunn
Helen Dannelly
Qiana Ellis
Jeff Hirst
Diana O'Connor
Josh Orr
Tina Rath
Tobias Tovera
Maryam Yousif


Friday December 12th + Saturday December 13th 2014
Open Studios: Friday Reception: 7pm - 10pm | Saturday: 12pm - 3pm


You are invited to Emeryville's Lowell Street Open Studios!

Enjoy an evening of fine art at the open studios located in a newly converted storage warehouse rebuilt as creative work spaces.

The Lowell Street Open Studios will feature a no-host bar to raise funds
for the Emeryville Youth Art Program.

*This Studio event is open to the public and admission is free*

5621 Lowell Street, Emeryville, CA 94608 | 415.999.4533


Oakland Youth Chorus' 40th Anniversary Holiday Concert

Saturday, December 13th, 2014 - Saturday, December 13th, 2014, 12/13/14, 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM

First Presbyterian Church of Oakland
2619 Broadway

In Oakland

Celebrate Oakland Youth Chorus' legacy of diversity in harmony with our 40th annual Holiday Concerts.

At 3:00pm, OYC's youngest Miracle Chorus ensembles from 11 school and community sites delight the audience with their own concert full of joyful world music from Venezuela, the Dominican Republic, Israel, Italy, Maori of New Zealand, and Nepal and holiday favorites.

At 6:00pm, OYC's Chamber Singers, Concert Chorus, Middle School ensembles and 3rd-5th grade Miracle Chorus singers from Oakland and other East Bay communities shine as they premiere a commissioned work by local jazz great Marcus Shelby and sing music from around the world such as Diwali, Niska Banja, El Vito, and Kaki Lambe. This concert also features a set by the Marcus Shelby Trio.

Join the singers of Oakland Youth Chorus to celebrate the holidays and four decades of friendships, songs, community, and creating harmony through diversity in Oakland and the East Bay.

Presented by Oakland Youth Chorus.

$10-$25.

The Nutcracker-Ballet San Jose

Saturday, December 13th, 2014 - Sunday, December 28th, 2014, 1:30pm and 7:00pm

San Jose Center for Performing Arts
255 Almaden Blvd

In

Nearly 100 dancers fill the stage with classic holiday magic and season surprises in Karen Gabay's stylish, smart staging that brims with bravura dancing and just the right amount of gingerbread to put even Ebenezer Scrooge in the holiday spirit. This is the traditional "Nutcracker" to see!

The Nutcracker-Ballet San Jose

Saturday, December 13th, 2014 - Sunday, December 28th, 2014, 1:30pm and 7:00pm

San Jose Center for Performing Arts
255 Almaden Blvd

In

Nearly 100 dancers fill the stage with classic holiday magic and season surprises in Karen Gabay's stylish, smart staging that brims with bravura dancing and just the right amount of gingerbread to put even Ebenezer Scrooge in the holiday spirit. This is the traditional "Nutcracker" to see!

Individual Dates & Times: *
Dec 13, 2014: 1:30 pm (Sat)
Dec 13, 2014: 7 pm (Sat)
Dec 14, 2014: 1:30 pm (Sun)
Dec 19, 2014: 7 pm (Fri)
Dec 20, 2014: 1:30 pm (Sat)
Dec 20, 2014: 7 pm (Sat)
Dec 21, 2014: 1:30 pm (Sun)
Dec 23, 2014: 1:30 pm (Tue)
Dec 23, 2014: 7 pm (Tue)
Dec 26, 2014: 1:30 pm (Fri)
Dec 27, 2014: 1:30 pm (Sat)
Dec 28, 2014: 1:30 pm (Sun)

Saba (Mikheil Chiaureli; USSR, 1929)

Saturday, December 13th, 2014 - Saturday, December 13th, 2014, 6:30pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

This silent melodrama, essentially a morality tale about the hazards of alcohol consumption, is not without humor. The film reworks Boris Sigal’s play The Trial of Stepan Korolev, setting the action in Tbilisi rather than Leningrad and developing the storyline about the downfall of the protagonist Saba (Aleqsandre Jaliashvili) before proceeding to the courtroom. The film benefits from dynamic shot compositions, sequences of rapid editing, and compelling performances in both the lead and supporting roles. Location shooting, such as the memorable opening sequence on a tram line in Tbilisi, offers glimpses of the city’s distinctive landmarks. 

• Written by Arsen Aravski, Shalva Alkhazishvili, based on the play The Trial of Stepan Korolev by Boris Sigal. Photographed by Anton Polikevich. With Aleqsandre Jaliashvili, Veriko Andjaparidze, L. Januashvili, Eka Chavchavadze. (100 mins, Silent with Russian intertitles and simultaneous English translation, B&W, 35mm, BAM/PFA Collection)

Nouvelle Vague (Jean-Luc Godard; Switzerland/France, 1990)

Saturday, December 13th, 2014 - Saturday, December 13th, 2014, 8:30pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Godard's Nouvelle Vague is a meditation on beauty, silence, and the inadequacy of language to register the richness of experience. From breathtaking images and odd juxtapositions of sound and silence he creates an obscure, yet luminously beautiful film. The plot, as usual for Godard, is slim. A rich, beautiful businesswoman (Domiziana Giordano) accidentally injures a hitchhiker (Alain Delon) and takes him home to her vast country estate. They enter into a complex relationship, fueled by sexual desire, divided by gender antagonism and class differences. Godard does not ignore the paradox that the seamless beauty of this cosseted world is won at the expense of the many, but his aphoristic soundtrack imagines a utopian future in which the division between rich and poor will seem only a quaint moment in history. For Godard there is a timeless world apart from politics: the lush and random mélange that comprises the material world.—SF International Film Festival '91

• Written by Godard. Photographed by William Lubtchansky. With Alain Delon, Domiziana Giordano. (90 mins, In French with English subtitles, Color, 35mm, From Institut Français, permission Vega Film)

Oakland East Bay Symphony Presents 'Let Us Break Bread Together'

Sunday, December 14th, 2014 - Sunday, December 14th, 2014, 12/14/14, 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

The Paramount Theatre
2025 Broadway

In Oakland

The Oakland East Bay Symphony, Music Director Michael Morgan and guests will ring in the holidays with this popular and delightfully untraditional concert. The beloved, often sold out annual multi-chorus extravaganza broke the holiday concert mold 22 years ago and features gospel music, holiday favorites and audience sing-alongs that invoke the multi-faceted spirits of the season.

This year's concert will feature a musical tribute to legendary folk singer/songwriter and activist Pete Seeger, who passed away earlier this year at the age of 94. The choruses and Symphony will perform works associated with Seeger with the audience invited to sing along. Guest artists include Oakland Symphony Chorus, Oakland Interfaith Gospel Choir, Mt. Eden High School Choir, Piedmont East Bay Children's Choir, and Linda Tillery & the Cultural Heritage Choir. The concert will be given Sunday, December 14, at 4 pm at the Paramount Theatre in Oakland. Tickets are priced $15-$55 and may be purchased at www.oebs.org.

Presented by Oakland East Bay Symphony.

$15-$55.

Closing Tea and Artist Talk: Robots and Storetry

Sunday, December 14th, 2014 - Sunday, December 14th, 2014, 3 - 6 pm

The Compound Gallery
1167 65th Ave

In Oakland

Closing Tea and Artist Talk for Robots and Storetry by Kevin Bradley. Numi Tea and snacks will be served. Talk begins at 4 pm.

For 25 years, Kevin Bradley has been scouring old barns and basements east of the Mississippi for these rare fonts and types from the 1800s and 1900s. He wants to bring to life the way the world communicated hundreds of years ago, only in a modern way — much like how modern folk musicians keep old songs alive, bringing them to contemporary listeners in new forms and textures. Bradley has even developed his own type of poetry called Storetry — a form of poetry/stories turned into posters. But at the most basic level, he’s a typographer — a last craftsman in a dying profession. He has a series of original images — robots, dinosaurs, Godzilla. Each of these images is made with letters, which you can see when you look up close. He’s experimenting every day with the form. “It’s a repository of the real stuff,” says Bradley.

Paradise Lost (Davit Rondeli; USSR, 1938)

Sunday, December 14th, 2014 - Sunday, December 14th, 2014, 4:00pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Director and screenwriter Davit Rondeli‘s “most lasting contribution to Georgian cinema is the comedy Paradise Lost, a hilarious satire loosely adapted from Davit Kldiashvili’s classical stories about the parasitic lifestyle of impoverished nobility. Misconstrued by some officials as ‘anti-Georgian,’ the film’s production was repeatedly interrupted; however, Rondeli in the end won critical recognition for his superb capturing of characters and situations. Paradise Lost is still called the best Georgian comedy of the 1930s” (Peter Rollberg, Historical Dictionary of Russian and Soviet Cinema).

• Written by Giorgi Mdivani, Rondeli. Photographed by Boris Buravlyov. With Dudukhana Tserodze, Bato Kraveishvili, Arkadi Khintibidze, Sh. Bejuashvili. (85 mins, In Georgian with English electronic titling, B&W, 35mm, From Gosfilmofond)

KITKA Women's Vocal Ensemble: Wintersongs by Candlelight

Friday, December 19th, 2014 - Friday, December 19th, 2014, 12/19/14, 8:00 PM - 10:00 PM

St. Paul's Episcopal Church
114 Montecito Ave.

In Oakland

"A refreshing spin on traditional seasonal choral music... A thoroughly marvelous concert!" - National Public Radio

Few things evoke the magic of the winter holidays as the transcendent splendor of the human voice raised in song. Kitka has researched and discovered a treasure-trove of seasonal music from a wide variety of Eastern European ethnic and spiritual traditions. "Wintersongs" showcases material ranging from rousing Slavic folk carols to lush, meditative Eastern Orthodox sacred choral works... from mesmerizing pre-Christian incantations for the longest nights of the year to Hebrew chants for Chanukah to original new pieces inspired by the beauty and mystery of wintertime.

Kitka engages in a unique repertoire development process. Each member of the ensemble works closely with native master folk singers and ethnomusicologists, listens to rare archival recordings of traditional Balkan, Baltic, Caucasian, and Slavic singers and choral ensembles, or traces the seasonal musical legacies of her own ethnic heritage.

Kitka, which means "bouquet" in Bulgarian and Macedonian, began as a grassroots group of singers from diverse ethnic and musical backgrounds who shared a passion for the stunning dissonances, asymmetric rhythms, intricate ornamentation, and resonant strength of traditional Eastern European women's vocal music. Since its informal beginnings, the group has evolved into an internationally-recognized professional ensemble known for its artistry, versatility, and mastery of the demanding techniques of Balkan and Slavic vocal styling. Through a busy itinerary of live and broadcast performances, recording, educational programs, master artist residencies, commissioning programs, and adventuresome collaborations, Kitka has exposed millions to the haunting beauty of their unique repertoire.

Presented by KITKA Women's Vocal Ensemble.

$15-$40.

Let's Go! A FREE Farewell Revel @ BAM/PFA

Sunday, December 21st, 2014 - Sunday, December 21st, 2014, 11am - 5pm

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
2626 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

A Full Day of Free Events at BAM/PFA

Come celebrate our final day of programs in this unique building, and send us off in style to our next home.

• Dance Battles by the Brilliant TURFinc

• Vibrant Vocals from All-Women Ensemble Kitka

• Performance by Groundbreaking Artist Dohee Lee

• Inspired Sound Art by Chris Kallmyer

• Art-Making for Kids of All Ages with Veronica Graham

• Performance of Ligeti’s Poème Symphonique for 100 Metronomes led by Sarah Cahill

Free Gifts for BAM/PFA Members
+ Special Surprises!

Followed by a parade to our new downtown location

KITKA Women's Vocal Ensemble: Wintersongs Community Sing

Sunday, December 21st, 2014 - Sunday, December 21st, 2014, 12/21/14, 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM

Nile Hall in Historic Preservation Park
668 13th Street

In Oakland

"A refreshing spin on traditional seasonal choral music... thoroughly marvelous!" - National Public Radio

Join Kitka in a celebratory circle of song! Experience the magic of raising your voice to create lush Eastern European seasonal harmonies as they were originally intended to be sung - by many voices in community! Kitka singers will lead the group in some fun "open voice" warm-ups, and will teach a varied selection of favorite tunes from their Wintersongs repertoire. Kitka's Community Sings are designed to be very inclusive. Singers of all ages are welcome and no experience is necessary.

Few things evoke the magic of the winter holidays as the transcendent splendor of the human voice raised in song. Kitka has researched and discovered a treasure-trove of seasonal music from a wide variety of Eastern European ethnic and spiritual traditions. "Wintersongs" showcases material ranging from rousing Slavic folk carols to lush, meditative Eastern Orthodox sacred choral works... from mesmerizing pre-Christian incantations for the longest nights of the year to Hebrew chants for Chanukah to original new pieces inspired by the beauty and mystery of wintertime.

Kitka, which means "bouquet" in Bulgarian and Macedonian, began as a grassroots group of singers from diverse ethnic and musical backgrounds who shared a passion for the stunning dissonances, asymmetric rhythms, intricate ornamentation, and resonant strength of traditional Eastern European women's vocal music. Since its informal beginnings, the group has evolved into an internationally-recognized professional ensemble known for its artistry, versatility, and mastery of the demanding techniques of Balkan and Slavic vocal styling. Through a busy itinerary of live performances, recording, educational programs, master artist residencies, commissioning programs, and adventuresome collaborations, Kitka has exposed millions to the haunting beauty of their unique repertoire.

Presented by KITKA Women's Vocal Ensemble.

Freewill Donation, Advance Reservation Recommended

Main Stage Concert: The Classics (Berkeley)

Wednesday, December 31st, 2014 - Wednesday, December 31st, 2014, 12/31/14, 8:00 PM - 10:00 PM

First Congregational Church
2345 Channing Way

In Berkeley

Benjamin Simon, conductor
Stephen Waarts, violin

W. A. Mozart - Overture to Cosi fan Tutte, K. 588
Sergei Prokofiev - Symphony No. 1 in D major, "Classical," Op. 25
Felix Mendelssohn - Violin Concerto in E minor, Op. 64

In the finest classical style, we raise our curtain with Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's brilliant overture to the 1790 comedy Cosi fan Tutte. Sergei Prokofiev's incandescent Classical Symphony gives the old form a modern twist, and Felix Mendelssohn, who adored Mozart above all others, brewed his own blend of sweetness and sophistication. The world's most beloved violin concerto will be performed by the Bay Area's rising superstar Stephen Waarts, our 2009 Debut Artist, who recently won first prize in the International Menuhin Competition.

Great music worth listening to. Classical masterpieces, unusual gems, and modern works offer a feast for your ears at every concert, while Maestro Simon's engaging onstage talks help you connect more powerfully with the music. Concerts are generally 90 to 120 minutes in length, with an intermission.

Admission is free to all concertgoers! Supporting members receive priority seating and priority entrance 60 minutes before concert time -- please bring your membership card with you. Non-members may enter 45 minutes before concert time.

Presented by San Francisco Chamber Orchestra.

$0 (Admission-Free!).

Free Dance at Luna’s Open House

Saturday, January 10th, 2015 - Saturday, January 10th, 2015, 9am-11am

Luna Dance Institute
605 Addison St.

In Berkeley

Dance, play & have fun with your child at Luna Dance Institute's free event! Our winter open house features creative dance and improvisation classes for all ages. Join us at 9am for dance story time in our professional library followed by free dance classes for young children up to teens. End the morning with a family dance party. Check out our beautiful dance studio located only minutes away from the Berkeley Aquatic Park and Fourth Street shopping center. Full schedule available online.

Saturday 1/10/15 from 9am-11am. FREE. 605 Addison St., Berkeley, CA 94710. Contact Jochelle Perena jperena@lunadanceinstitute.org, 510-883-1118, lunadanceinstitute.org.

19th Annual The Art of Living Black

Saturday, January 10th, 2015 - Friday, February 27th, 2015, Tue-Sat, 10am – 5pm; Sun 12 – 5pm

Richmond Art Center
2540 Barrett Ave

In Richmond

The Richmond Art Center is proud to host the only annual, non-juried exhibition in the Bay Area to exclusively feature regional artists of African descent. Works by over 50 local artists in a wide variety of media, including painting, drawing, photography, jewelry and metal arts, ceramics and much more. This exhibition will feature works by the 2014 Jan Hart-Schuyers Award winners: Asual Aswad, Yolanda Holley, Atiba Sylvia Thomas and Lawrence Buford.

Richmond Art Center Faculty Show

Saturday, January 10th, 2015 - Saturday, March 7th, 2015, Tue-Sat, 10am – 5pm; Sun 12 – 5pm

Richmond Art Center
2540 Barrett Ave

In Richmond

The Richmond Art Center has a long and rich history of inspiring students of all ages. This exhibition celebrates the unique and diverse work of the Art Center’s faculty—a talented group of professional artist-instructors who inspire creativity in students of all ages. Featured media include ceramics, weaving, fiber arts, screen printing, painting, drawing, printmaking and more.

Yisrael K. Feldsott: Annunciating Obscurities

Saturday, January 10th, 2015 - Saturday, March 7th, 2015, Tue-Sat, 10am – 5pm; Sun 12 – 5pm

Richmond Art Center
2540 Barrett Ave

In Richmond

Featuring works from the 1970s to the present that showcase the artist’s exploration of the formal potentials of disparate materials to portray the gamut of the human experience. Feldsott's work is influenced by his time immersed in the traditions of indigenous communities in Central and South America, where he became a shaman and championed environmental issues.

Berkeley Symphony: Sanctuary

Thursday, January 15th, 2015 - Thursday, January 15th, 2015, 8-10pm

Zellerbach Hall
101 Zellerbach Hall #4800, Berkeley, CA 94720

In Berkeley

Commissioned by the City of Birmingham Orchestra, Asyla was given its premiere in 1997, under the baton of Sir Simon Rattle. As is typical of Adès, the title implies both a place of rest and a home for the mentally unstable, capturing the subversive tone of the piece. Berkeley Symphony is honored to introduce Bay Area audiences to this important work. One of the best-loved works in the classical music repertoire, Tchaikovsky’s “Pathétique” Symphony premiered in October of 1843, conducted by the composer, only nine days prior to his death. Its rich melodies and passionate romanticism remain profoundly moving and provide a welcome escape from 21st century realism.

Very First Concert: Bang On A Pan (Berkeley)

Monday, January 19th, 2015 - Monday, January 19th, 2015, Monday, Jan 19, 11 a.m. & 12:00 p.m.

Crowden School
1475 Rose St

In Berkeley

The oldest musical instrument is the rock. Not even cavemen could resist the urge to tap stones together and start getting their groove on! Meet three of the San Francisco Chamber Orchestra's team of top percussionists, those versatile musicians that can be found at the back of the orchestra, handling everything from a bass drum and cymbals to a thundersheet and crotales.

The SFCO's concert series for babies, toddlers, and children was created by Music Director Ben Simon in 2007. These "mini concerts" feature a simple musical concept, short selections of classical repertoire, tumbling mats as an alternative to chairs, hands-on musical activities, and lively back-and-forth dialogue between the performers and the audience.

Consistently popular, these concerts are characterized as much by the young listeners' lively response to the rhythmic games and activities in which they engage as they are by the rapt attention paid to the Orchestra's performance.

Admission is free, but donations are gladly accepted. The San Francisco Chamber Orchestra's Very First Concert series is a fully professional production, produced in collaboration with the Crowden school of Berkeley. Seating is first come, first served.

Monday, January 19 - Concert begins at 11:00 a.m. & 12:00 p.m. (Repeat Performances)
The Crowden School, 1475 Rose St, Berkeley

Renowned for its brilliant programming and top-quality musicians, the San Francisco Chamber Orchestra is drawing capacity crowds and national attention for its unique admission-free policy. Committed to cultivating new audiences for classical music, the SFCO has earned its place among the best Bay Area ensembles. The Orchestra performs four Main Stage Concert programs each season, plus a wide variety of educational outreach programs, including three Family Concert programs and two Very First Concert programs for their youngest listeners.

Presented by San Francisco Chamber Orchestra.

$0 (Free).

THE GREAT POETS From Shakespeare to Dryden

Sunday, January 25th, 2015, 7:30pm

St. Mary Magdalen Church
2005 Berryman Street

In Berkeley

Anna Dennis, soprano
Music of Dowland, Johnson, Ferrabosco, Lanier, Danyel, Lawes & Purcell
Direct from London, soprano Anna Dennis joins Voices of Music for an evening of 17th-century Poetry and Music

Thursday January 22, 8pm
Throckmorton Theatre
142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley

Friday January 23, 8pm
All Saints Episcopal Church
555 Waverley Street, Palo Alto

Saturday January 24, 8pm
St. Mark's Lutheran Church
1111 O'Farrell Street, San Francisco

Sunday January 25, 7:30pm Berkeley St. Mary Magdalen
St. Mary Magdalen Church
2005 Berryman Street, Berkeley

Artist Talk: The Art of Living Black

Saturday, February 7th, 2015 - Saturday, February 7th, 2015, 12 - 1:30 pm

Richmond Art Center
2540 Barrett Ave

In Richmond

Listen to a panel of regional artists of African descent as they discuss their influences and wide-ranging artwork in the 19th annual The Art of Living Black exhibition. This exhibition features over 50 local artists and runs through February 27, 2015

Richmond Art Center Opening Reception

Saturday, February 7th, 2015 - Saturday, February 7th, 2015, 2 - 5 pm

Richmond Art Center
2540 Barrett Ave

In Richmond

Enjoy the work of emerging and established Bay Area artists at this reception for new exhibitions. See artwork by 50 local artists of African American descent in the 19th Annual The Art of Living Black; works by the Art Center’s talented professional artist-instructors; and the mixed-media work of Yisrael Feldsott which explores of the formal potentials of disparate materials to portray the gamut of the human experience.

See & Make Art

Saturday, February 7th, 2015 - Saturday, February 7th, 2015, 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM

Richmond Art Center
2540 Barrett Ave

In Richmond

Join us for our free, first Saturday bilingual art tours! Come and enjoy a guided tour of the Richmond Art Center's four galleries and a hands-on art making activity! Open to all ages. Families welcome.

Please meet the group in the Madeline F. Whittlesey Community Room at the Richmond Public Library, Main Branch (325 Civic Center Plaza) and we’ll walk as a group over to the Art Center.

Berkeley Symphony and Friends Chamber Music Series

Sunday, February 8th, 2015 - Sunday, February 8th, 2015, 5-7pm

Piedmont Center for the Arts
801 Magnolia Avenue, Piedmont, CA 94611

In

The Piedmont Center for the Arts will host a series of four chamber music concerts featuring Berkeley Symphony musicians and their guests. Artists: René Mandel, violin; Peter Wyrick, cello; Markus Pawlik, piano. Presenting works by Mozart and Tchaikovsky.

Artist Talk: The Art of Living Black

Saturday, February 14th, 2015 - Saturday, February 14th, 2015, 12 - 1:30 pm

Richmond Art Center
2540 Barrett Ave

In Richmond

Listen to a panel of regional artists of African descent as they discuss their influences and wide-ranging artwork in the 19th annual The Art of Living Black exhibition. This exhibition features over 50 local artists and runs through February 27, 2015

Jazz Art

Saturday, February 21st, 2015 - Saturday, February 21st, 2015, 1 - 3 pm

Richmond Art Center
2540 Barrett Ave

In Richmond

Listen to acclaimed musicians, India Cooke and Don Robinson, and let their music inspire you to make art. This hands-on art-making event is perfect for everyone in your family to get in the groove and express themselves by drawing, painting or collaging. Materials are provided by the Art Center, but feel free to bring your own. All ages. Children under 12 must be accompanied by an adult.

Berkeley Symphony: Imagination

Thursday, February 26th, 2015 - Thursday, February 26th, 2015, 8-10pm

Zellerbach Hall
101 Zellerbach Hall #4800, Berkeley, CA 94720

In Berkeley

Maurice Ravel’s delightful Mother Goose Suite opens the program. A series of illustrations of French fairy tales was the inspiration behind this piece, which started out as a piano duet, then was expanded to a ballet, from which this orchestra suite was derived. Jake Heggie’s Camille Claudel: Into the Fire was premiered to great acclaim as a song cycle for mezzo-soprano and string quartet in San Francisco in 2012. Berkeley Symphony commissioned Mr. Heggie to write the orchestral version, which receives its world premiere with the enchanting Sasha Cooke as soloist. This performance closes with Brahms’ powerful Fourth Symphony, completed only a year after the premiere of his Third Symphony.

The Art of Living Black: Open Studio

Saturday, March 7th, 2015 - Saturday, March 7th, 2015, 11 am - 5 pm

Richmond Art Center
2540 Barrett Ave

In Richmond

This one-day art fair and gallery sale is a unique opportunity to meet The Art of Living Black artists and purchase their work. View works by sculptors, painters, jewelry makers, mixed media artists, photographers, ceramic artists and so much more.

See & Make Art

Saturday, March 7th, 2015 - Saturday, March 7th, 2015, 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM

Richmond Art Center
2540 Barrett Ave

In Richmond

Join us for our free, first Saturday bilingual art tours! Come and enjoy a guided tour of the Richmond Art Center's four galleries and a hands-on art making activity! Open to all ages. Families welcome.

Please meet the group in the Madeline F. Whittlesey Community Room at the Richmond Public Library, Main Branch (325 Civic Center Plaza) and we’ll walk as a group over to the Art Center.

Steffani Stabat Mater

Sunday, March 22nd, 2015, 7:30pm

St. Mary Magdalen Church
2005 Berryman Street

In Berkeley

An all-star cast performs Agostino Steffani’s baroque masterpiece, Stabat Mater, and the Carissimi oratorio Vanitas, Vanitatum.

Jennifer Ellis Kampani & Céline Ricci, sopranos
Clifton Massey, countertenor
Paul Elliott & Christopher LeCluyse, tenors
John Bischoff, bass
Elizabeth Blumenstock & Kati Kyme, baroque violin
Lisa Grodin, baroque viola
Adaiha MacAdam-Somer, baroque cello
Farley Pearce, violone
David Tayler, theorbo
Hanneke van Proosdij, organ

Thursday, March 19, 2015, 8 pm
All Saints Episcopal Church
555 Waverley Street, Palo Alto

Friday, March 20, 2015, 8 pm
St. Stephen's Episcopal Church
3 Bayview Avenue, Belvedere

Saturday, March 21, 2015, 8 pm
St. Mark's Lutheran Church
1111 O'Farrell Street, San Francisco

Berkeley Symphony: I'm a Performer Family Concert

Saturday, April 11th, 2015 - Saturday, April 11th, 2015, 10am and 11:30am

Malcom X Middle School
1731 Prince Street

In Berkeley

Rosin your bow and polish your horn! Get ready for this one-of-a-kind opportunity to perform alongside professional orchestra musicians! An annual tradition at Berkeley Symphony, “I’m a Performer!” family concerts are open to all music lovers, instrumentalists and singers alike. Together, you and the orchestra will perform popular tunes, including “Ode to Joy” and our signature tune, “I Am a Fine Musician.” Concerts are FREE.

Berkeley Symphony and Friends Chamber Music Series

Sunday, April 12th, 2015 - Sunday, April 12th, 2015, 5-7pm

Piedmont Center for the Arts
801 Magnolia Avenue, Piedmont, CA 94611

In

The Piedmont Center for the Arts will host a series of four chamber music concerts featuring Berkeley Symphony musicians and their guests. Artists: Dan Flanagan, violin; Elizabeth Prior, viola; Jonah Kim, cello; Miles Graber, piano. Presenting works by Ravel and Fauré. Tickets are $25.

Berkeley Symphony: Homage

Thursday, April 30th, 2015 - Thursday, April 30th, 2015, 8-10pm

Zellerbach Hall
101 Zellerbach Hall #4800, Berkeley, CA 94720

In Berkeley

First produced in 1991, John Adams’ opera The Death of Klinghoffer is based on the hijacking of the passenger liner Achille Lauro by the Palestine Liberation Front in 1995, and the resulting murder of Jewish-American passenger Leon Klinghoffer. Mozart’s Requiem was composed in Vienna in 1791, during the last year of the composer’s life. Though considered one of Mozart’s most popular and respected works, the question remains as to how much of the music he actually completed before his death and how much was later composed by others. The Orchestra is joined by soloists from the Adler Fellowship Program of the San Francisco Opera Center and the choruses from the University of California, Berkeley.

Under Construction

Saturday, May 2nd, 2015 - Saturday, May 2nd, 2015, 3pm

Osher Studio
2055 Center Street

In Berkeley

Working in collaboration with EarShot: the National Orchestral Composition Discovery Network, and its partner organizations – the American Composers Forum, League of American Orchestras, New Music USA and the American Composers Orchestra – Berkeley Symphony will expand its Under Construction New Music Series/Composers Program. Participating composers receive artistic and career guidance from Music Director Joana Carneiro and mentor composers, as well as from the orchestra musicians. Tickets are $10.

Under Construction II

Sunday, May 3rd, 2015 - Sunday, May 3rd, 2015, 7-9pm

Osher Studio
2055 Center Street

In Berkeley

Working in collaboration with EarShot: the National Orchestral Composition Discovery Network, and its partner organizations – the American Composers Forum, League of American Orchestras, New Music USA and the American Composers Orchestra – Berkeley Symphony will expand its Under Construction New Music Series/Composers Program. Participating composers receive artistic and career guidance from Music Director Joana Carneiro and mentor composers, as well as from the orchestra musicians.



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