Upcoming Events


Annual Purchase Award

Monday, November 1st, 2010 - Sunday, November 1st, 2015, 9-5 Monday-Friday

Emeryville City Hall
1333 Park Blvd.

In Emeryville

The lobby of City Hall in Emeryville serves as an emerging gallery of local artworks.  Since 2005, the City has acquired one work which was selected from the Annual Emeryville Celebration of the Arts Exhibit held each October.  The juried exhibit showcases the work of the many professional artists who live and work here.  With a long tradition of artists cooperative housing, Emeryville is home to large number of artists, in fact, Emeryville may boast one of the most dense artists populations per capita in the Bay Region.  Past Purchase Award acquisitions include paintings by Canan Tolon and Michael Murphy, textile by Ana Lisa Hedstrom, light sculpture by Therese Lahaie and a ceramic wall hanging by Cuong Ta.  All the works as well as installations in and around City Hall such as Roger Berry's Solar Rose can be viewed suring normal business hours when City Hall is open to the public.  Please visit soon!


Deities, Demons, and Teachers of Tibet, Nepal, and India

Friday, March 21st, 2014 - Sunday, September 14th, 2014, 11:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
2626 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Joyful and sensual sculptural figures of Indian deities and dancers join radiant images of enlightened beings from Tibet and Nepal in Deities, Demons, and Teachers, which presents a rotating display of works by anonymous Indian, Nepalese, and Tibetan artisans. A tenth-century sandstone figure of Ganesha, the elephant-headed deity worshipped by Hindus, Jains, and Buddhists, graces the entrance to the exhibition, a site appropriate to Ganesha’s role in removing obstacles and blessing any new endeavor. Whether viewed as a cosmic dancer or a cavorting adolescent, this image of Ganesha is confirmation of the wonder and delight to be found in the sculpture and painting of these ancient cultures.

Hindus and Buddhists both revere and celebrate female deities and often depict goddesses in idealized form with exaggerated marks of beauty. In Dancing Devi, a twelfth-century buff-sandstone sculpture from central India, the beauty of the bejeweled and crowned figure is accentuated by the larger-than-life proportions of breasts and buttocks. A more reserved but no less beautifully idealized feminine form is seen in Tara, a seventeenth-century Nepalese bronze, where the figure is surrounded by a fanciful garden of birds, musicians, and garlands.

Very early images of the Buddha are rare, so it is quite exceptional that in addition to the massive bronze fourteenth-century Tibetan Buddha in the center of the gallery, this exhibition also features a stone image of a third-century seated Buddha from the Swat Valley and a tenth- or eleventh-century bronze Standing Buddha from Western Tibet. An array of bodhisattvas and attendant deities from these regions, including a painting of the Thirteenth Karmapa (at left), believed to be a reincarnation of the Bodhisattva Avalokitesvara, fill out the gathered celestial realm of the Buddhist cosmology.


Deities, Demons, and Teachers is organized by Senior Curator for Asian Art
Julia M. White. With some exceptions, the works in this exhibition ar

Envisioning Human Rights: The Next Generation

Wednesday, April 23rd, 2014 - Sunday, September 21st, 2014, 11:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
2626 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Visual art can be a powerful tool to create awareness and change in the face of both national and international human rights abuses. BAM/PFA has a long history of art and film exhibitions addressing a broad spectrum of social justice issues, and now we have teamed up with the Human Rights Center at the UC Berkeley School of Law to celebrate their twentieth anniversary with a juried exhibition of artworks by University of California students.

Envisioning Human Rights: The Next Generation includes paintings, photographs, and prints by emerging artist/activists from across the state, addressing critical human rights issues. In conjunction with this juried exhibition, we are also presenting a selection of works from the Abu Ghraib series by world-renowned artist Fernando Botero that the artist generously donated to BAM/PFA in recognition of Berkeley’s historic role in the arena of human rights. Four paintings from the same series are also on view at Boalt Hall. A related invitational exhibition, featuring works by internationally acclaimed human rights photographers who have worked with the Human Rights Center over the past two decades, will be presented at the Boalt Law Gallery in fall 2014.


Envisioning Human Rights: The Next Generation is organized by Lucinda Barnes, chief curator and director of programs and collections at BAM/PFA, and artist Pamela Blotner, curator of the Human Rights Center’s anniversary exhibitions. Members of the BAM/PFA Student Committee have also contributed to this student-focused project, especially in the areas of outreach and curatorial process.

Forrest Bess: Seeing Things Invisible

Wednesday, June 11th, 2014 - Sunday, September 14th, 2014, 11:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
2626 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Forrest Bess (1911–1977) described himself as a visionary artist. His small but powerful abstract paintings, with their thick paint and handmade rough-hewn frames, are deeply personal. They draw on a vocabulary of simple biomorphic shapes and symbols the artist developed over the course of years from his recurring visions; when he awoke each morning, he would sketch the shapes he had seen on the inside of his eyelids in the twilight between sleep and wakefulness. While resonant with Modernist abstraction, Bess’s beautiful and mysterious pictures suggest a spirituality akin to indigenous religious icons.

For most of his career, Bess lived an isolated existence in a fishing camp outside of Bay City, Texas. He made a meager living fishing and selling bait. However, by night and during the off-season, Bess read, wrote, and painted prolifically. He taught himself to paint by copying the still lifes and landscapes of artists he admired, including Vincent van Gogh and Albert Pinkham Ryder. He was also interested in Symbolism, the exploration of universal truths, and particularly the writings of Carl Jung. Despite his isolation, Bess developed an underground following and was known to a number of other artists and art historians, including Meyer Schapiro, who collected his work. In 1949, he traveled to New York and met the prominent dealer Betty Parsons, who between 1950 and 1967 organized several solo exhibitions of his work at her gallery in New York, one of the most avant-garde of its time.

Forrest Bess: Seeing Things Invisible pairs Bess’s paintings, dating from 1946 to 1970, with an installation of archival materials curated by sculptor Robert Gober, titled The Man That Got Away, which illuminates Bess’s art and life. The exhibition of this piece at the 2012 Whitney Biennial renewed interest in the magnetic, compelling paintings of Forrest Bess, whose reputation had waned, along with his health, in the 1970s.


Forrest Bess: Seeing Things Invisible is organized by

Hofmann by Hofmann

Wednesday, July 2nd, 2014 - Sunday, December 21st, 2014, 11:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
2626 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

In 1960 Hans Hofmann (1880–1966) described the just-completed painting Summer Bliss as one of his finest. At the suggestion of Erle Loran, then chair of the UC Berkeley Art Department, Hofmann offered Summer Bliss to the University in honor of professor Worth Ryder, who had passed away earlier that year. Ryder, who like Loran had studied with Hofmann years earlier in Germany, had invited Hofmann to teach at Berkeley in 1930, initiating what Hofmann later identified as his “start in America as a teacher and artist.”1

Three years later, Hofmann made another gift to the University—nearly fifty paintings representing the highest artistic achievement of his career, plus a pledge of $250,000 in support of the burgeoning University Art Museum (now BAM/PFA). At Hofmann’s request, Erle Loran was closely involved in choosing the paintings for this profoundly generous gift, selecting from among significant older works as well the strongest examples of his later practice. Although Hofmann died before the entire group was finalized, the BAM/PFA Hofmann collection, recognized as the world’s most extensive museum collection of his work, embodies the artist’s desire for it to be both excellent and comprehensive.

As we prepare to move to our new building in downtown Berkeley, it seems fitting to revisit the enduring vitality and generosity of Hofmann’s extraordinary gift. Hofmann by Hofmann focuses on the first paintings selected personally by Hofmann for BAM/PFA. Fantasia (1943), one of the earliest works, straddles a cusp between Surrealism and Abstract Expressionism while also anticipating the compositional logic and push-pull spatial dynamics of his signature color plane works of the 1950s and 1960s, such as Summer Bliss. In Nocturnal Splendor (1963) and Gloriamundi (1963), two of the later canvases, Hofmann employs contrasting colors and the arrangement of shapes into expanding and contracting forces (push-pull) to create the experience of three-dimensional space. “Space,”

Cross Section: Recent Acquisitions

Wednesday, July 16th, 2014 - Sunday, August 31st, 2014

Mills College Art Museum
5000 MacArthur Blvd

In Oakland

Opening Reception: Wednesday, July 16 2014 | 6:00-8:00 pm

Cross Section: Recent Acquisitions showcases recently acquired pieces in dialogue with artwork from the Mills College Art Museum’s permanent collection. The exhibition celebrates the diversity of the museum’s holdings, featuring a range of media from painting and photography, to sculpture and works on paper. The exhibition draws together multiple themes and ideas through a collection of very different artworks and artists and features new acquisitions of work by Carrie Mae Weems, Judy Chicago, Mika Rottenberg, Sylvia Sleigh, Kathryn Spence, Binh Danh, Pae White, Allison Smith, Nathan Oliveira, and Joanne Leonard among others.

For more information visit mcam.mills.edu.

Looking Intently: The James Cahill Legacy

Wednesday, July 23rd, 2014 - Sunday, December 21st, 2014, 11:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
2626 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

The late James Cahill, Professor Emeritus at UC Berkeley, was known as a brilliant scholar, exceptional teacher and writer, and extraordinary connoisseur and collector of Chinese and Japanese paintings. He began collecting in the mid-1950s as a Fulbright Scholar in Japan, where he encountered significantly undervalued Chinese paintings of the Ming and Qing periods. At the time few collectors were interested in these later paintings and fewer still understood their inherent value. But Cahill recognized their importance and so began a lifelong pursuit of fine paintings. His collection became known by his studio name, Ching Yuan Chai, given to him by his own teacher, Shimada Shujiro. As Cahill wrote, “It could be either Studio of Someone Looking into the Yuan (as I was for my dissertation) or, more prestigiously, Someone Gazing into the Abstruse.” Today paintings associated with that studio name are among the treasures that make up the core of the BAM/PFA Chinese painting collection. In fond memory of James Cahill (1926–2014), we present this selection from the collection in tribute to his tremendous generosity and commitment to Berkeley and to BAM/PFA.

Cahill, unlike some of his contemporaries as well as historic Chinese collectors, did not mark with a seal or inscription the paintings in his collection. Rather, he made his mark by donating—and encouraging others to donate—exceptionally fine paintings to BAM/PFA. This small exhibition presents just a handful of works, but they demonstrate the unparalleled range of Cahill’s collecting interests, from Summer Trees Casting Shade, a large decorative painting by Dai Jin (1388–1462), to the quietly cerebral The Zhiping Temple by Wen Zhengming (1470–1559).

Cahill frequently used the collection for teaching, engaging students in dialogue about brushwork, connoisseurship, authenticity, and condition, and looking intently at real works of art, a tradition that continues today.


Looking Intently: The James Cahill Legacy is

MATRIX 254 / Geta Brătescu

Friday, July 25th, 2014 - Sunday, September 28th, 2014, 11:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
2626 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

MATRIX 254 features the work of Romanian artist Geta Brătescu (b. 1926), who has been living and working in Bucharest since the 1950s. Working across a wide range of media (graphic design, drawing, video, textiles, performance, installation, photography, and printmaking), Brătescu is a central figure in postwar Romanian art. Having exhibited regularly in Romania throughout her career, she has maintained a rigorous studio practice that continues into the present. Due primarily to Communist leader Nicolae Ceauşescu’s totalitarian regime (1967–89), which suppressed the work of avant-garde artists living and working in Romania, and the subsequent political isolation of the country, Brătescu’s work was little known to international audiences until fairly recently. For MATRIX 254, Brătescu’s first solo exhibition in a U.S. museum, the artist presents a focused selection of key works made between the years 1977 and 2000.

The space of Brătescu’s studio assumes a pivotal position within the artist’s oeuvre, as exemplified in an early video, The Studio (1978), where we see the artist creating work inside this intimate room. The camera (operated by fellow artist Ion Grigorescu) pans over artworks that fill the space and captures the playful, experimental approach that characterizes her practice. Related to the performances Brătescu carried out in the studio is her frequent use of role-playing and self-portraiture, as in the photograph Mrs. Oliver in her traveling costume (1985), where she dons an alter ego. Drawing and collage have also been mainstays of her practice. In the series Memorie (Memory) (1990), Brătescu presents forty unique, abstract collages, all black and deep indigo painted on paper. Made just after the Romanian Revolution in 1989, these works subtly conjure her deep reflection on this dark period of her personal and national history.


Geta Bratescu / MATRIX 254 is organized by Apsara DiQuinzio, curator of modern and contemporary art and Phyllis C. Wattis M

Acting workshop with Golden Thread

Sunday, August 3rd, 2014 - Monday, September 8th, 2014, 3:00-6:00pm

La Pena Cultural Center
3105 Shattuck Ave. Berkeley, CA 94705

In Berkeley

Drawing from plays by Middle Eastern and Middle Eastern American playwrights, this 9-week workshop will enhance the participants’ skills in improvisation, scene study and solo performance. The curriculum will begin with 3 sessions focused on improvisation, physical performance techniques, and stock charcaters rooted in Commedia dell Arte. Participants will apply those skills in the next 4 sessions towards dramatic text analysis, building a character, and physical story-telling. The participants will present their scenes at the final session which will be open to invited guests. By the end of the term, participants will have developed stronger improvisational skills, deeper understanding of dramatic character & text, and more confidence in self-expression.
No prior acting experience required.

Call for Entries: Collect! Free to Enter

Thursday, August 7th, 2014 - Friday, September 19th, 2014

Berkeley Art Center
1275 WALNUT ST

In Berkeley

Deadline September 19, 11:59pm
2D and 3D Media
Free to Enter

Collect! is our largest annual event and this year we are trying something new. Not only are we planning a silent auction, we are also creating a stunning exhibition and we want you to be a part of it. At our last Collect! event, over 300 collectors, curators, arts professionals and artists were in attendance. It is a terrific opportunity to showcase your artwork to new audiences and have a great time doing it.

The funds from this event directly support year-round programming, including our Programs for Young Artists at BAC as well as our exhibitions, lectures, workshops and public events.

Visit https://berkeley-art.squarespace.com/collect-call for more information and to apply.


Everything Must Go!

Saturday, August 9th, 2014 - Sunday, September 14th, 2014, Opening 6 - 9 pm

The Compound Gallery
1167 65th Ave

In Oakland

Everything Must Go! -from Grand Openings to Clearance Sales: Signs of Change
Examining the art of the “for sale” sign... Hand painted signs by some of the best Bay Area sign painters.
Featuring signs by Aaron Cruse, Ashley Fundora, Heather Hardison, Damon Styer, Scott Thiessen and Pickles!

Opening reception August 9 from 6 to 9pm
Gallery open Wednesday through Sunday noon to 7pm

Berlin to Broadway with Kurt Weill

Friday, August 22nd, 2014 - Saturday, September 20th, 2014, August 22, 23, 8pm to 10pm, August 29, 30, 8pm, August 31, 2pm, September 5, 6, 8pm, September 7, 2pm, September 12, 13, 8pm, September 14, 2pm September 19, 20, 8pm

Masquers Playhouse
105 Park Place

In

A remarkable musical voyage through the career of one of the greatest artists of the 20th century. Weill's musical masterpieces are presented in a glorious blend of song and story that takes us from the terror of Hitler's Germany to the glamour of the golden age of the Great White Way. From The New York Times: "Weill holds a solid place in the pantheon of 20th-century composers...a harbinger of today's boundary-crossing musicians. A genius." The show includes many of Weill's most famous and beloved compositions, "Speak Low," "Mack the Knife," "Saga of Jenny," "Surabaya Johnny," and many more.

Presented by Masquers Playhouse.

$22.

Make Space

Saturday, August 23rd, 2014 - Sunday, October 5th, 2014, Wed - Sun, 11am - 5pm

Berkeley Art Center
1275 Walnut Street

In Berkeley

Join us for the opening reception on Saturday, August 23, 5-8 PM

Berkeley Art Center is thrilled to present Make Space, a group exhibition featuring new and existing work by, Randy Dixon, Nancy Ivanhoe, Tressa Pack, Erik Parra, Dimitra Skandali. This show challenges artists to re-contextualize their art practice within the walls of the Berkeley Art Center; an art space like no other in the Bay Area.

During a time of dramatic economic and cultural shifts in the Bay Area, art spaces are closing, moving and utterly transforming in order to adapt to the changing financial and social changes of the region. However the Berkeley Art Center is a site fixed within Live Oak Park in North Berkeley. What relationship does the site of the Center, situated in a beautiful city park, have to the artwork within it? How can we consider what this art space means and how it functions within the great arts community?

Conversation with Christian Frock and Megan Wilson
Saturday, September 20, 4-6 PM
Christian Frock and Megan Wilson will come together to talk about the recent and rapid changes happening in the Bay Area’s cultural community and how it is effecting housing, work spaces and art making as a whole. Moderated by Aimee Le Duc.

Dinner at Mz. Pat’s House

Friday, August 29th, 2014, 8:00pm

la Pena Cultural Center
3105 Shattuck Ave. Berkeley, CA 94705

In Berkeley

Playwright: Jovelyn Richards

Director: Stephanie Johnson

Cabaret/Concert

La Peña Cultural Center Presents: Mz. Pat’s the first legal brothel in Berkeley since the days of the gold rush!

It’s “the other Great Depression.” There are several reasons you get to sit down to dinner at Mz. Pat’s House, a well-known brothel in Cleveland, Ohio, in the ’30s and ’40s: Somebody tried to kill you or you tried to kill somebody; you’re a homosexual; you “passing for somebody you ain’t”; “you old and nobody want you no mo’”; “you too ugly”; or you just “got a story to tell.” Come to Mz. Pat’s—a house of magic and mystery!

Storyteller Extraordinaire and International Performer: Jovelyn Richards weaves the tales of four heart gripping characters that jump to the music of jazz and blues. Stories of racism, homophobia, murder and mystery and through it all love, during the 1930’s other great depression.

August 29th and 30th

Enjoy a front row dinner experience @ Mz. Pat’s table $20.00 (food priced separate) complimentary glass of wine/beverage.

Advance tickets reg. seating $12.00 and $15.00 at the door.

Doors open at 7:30pm show times 8:00pm

"Strong Girls Rule" Screening of Maidentrip

Saturday, August 30th, 2014 - Saturday, August 30th, 2014, 3PM

Berkeley Public Library - West Branch
1125 University Avenue

In Berkeley

Berkeley Public Library presents a free three-part film discussion series called “Strong Girls Rule” celebrating women in sport and highlighting some of our exceptional local athletes. Each session will include a film screening followed by discussion and Q&A with a range of special guests. Teens are especially encouraged to attend.

The series opens on Saturday, August 30th at 2 p.m. at the West Branch, 1125 University Avenue with a craft program of nautical knot tying led by West Branch’s Teen Librarian. At 3 p.m. there will be a screening of Maidentrip (82 min.) an inspirational feature length documentary directed by Jillian Schlesinger about Laura Dekker, the youngest person to sail alone around the world. The screening will be followed by discussion and Q&A with Stephanie Evans, Commodore of Berkeley’s Cal Sailing Club. Attendees will learn more about sailing in Berkeley and Evans’ personal experiences as a woman sailor.

This free program is sponsored by the Friends of the Berkeley Public Library (www.berkeleylibraryfriends.org). For questions regarding this program, call 510-981-6241 or visit the library’s website: www.berkeleypubliclibrary.org

Dinner at Mz. Pat’s House

Saturday, August 30th, 2014, 8:00pm

La Pena Cultural Center
3105 Shattuck Ave. Berkeley, CA 94705

In Berkeley

Playwright: Jovelyn Richards

Director: Stephanie Johnson

Cabaret/Concert

La Peña Cultural Center Presents: Mz. Pat’s the first legal brothel in Berkeley since the days of the gold rush!

It’s “the other Great Depression.” There are several reasons you get to sit down to dinner at Mz. Pat’s House, a well-known brothel in Cleveland, Ohio, in the ’30s and ’40s: Somebody tried to kill you or you tried to kill somebody; you’re a homosexual; you “passing for somebody you ain’t”; “you old and nobody want you no mo’”; “you too ugly”; or you just “got a story to tell.” Come to Mz. Pat’s—a house of magic and mystery!

Storyteller Extraordinaire and International Performer: Jovelyn Richards weaves the tales of four heart gripping characters that jump to the music of jazz and blues. Stories of racism, homophobia, murder and mystery and through it all love, during the 1930’s other great depression.

August 29th and 30th

Enjoy a front row dinner experience @ Mz. Pat’s table $20.00 (food priced separate) complimentary glass of wine/beverage.

Advance tickets reg. seating $12.00 and $15.00 at the door.

Doors open at 7:30pm show times 8:00pm

Launch Your School Year Happy Hour

Tuesday, September 2nd, 2014 - Tuesday, September 2nd, 2014, 5-7pm

Luna Dance Institute
605 Addison Street

In Berkeley

Enjoy drinks with Luna friends! Explore our library. Check out upcoming workshops and get collegial support! Re-connect, relax & refresh as you begin your year!

Marketing for Artist and Small Businesses

Tuesday, September 2nd, 2014 - Tuesday, September 23rd, 2014, 6:30pm-9:00pm

La Peña Cultural Center
3105 Shattuck Avenue

In Berkeley

Learn, develop, and implement unique strategies: Stand out from the competition, and build your brand.

Taught by Zaque Eyn. Background in music and marketing of over 13 years, with clients such as: Michael Jackson, Anita Baker, The Family Stone, OK GO...
Combined with book, Mastering the Music Business, his accomplishments and achievements Enlighten you on a journey down innovation lane:

Marketing Master 4 Week Course
Students will create, build, and execute a professional marketing plan: learn innovation techniques for competing advantage, and how to make it all happen.

Week 1: The Foundation of Innovation
Week 2: Understanding your Demographics
Week 3: Innovative Advantage
Week 4: Branding Future

Course Total: $300

Blues Dance with Beyond Blues

Wednesday, September 3rd, 2014 - Wednesday, September 24th, 2014, 7:00 pm

La Peña Cultural Center
3105 Shattuck Avenue

In Berkeley

Instructor: Ted Maddry (415-484-3031), with rotating guest instructors | Location: Theater Space

Join Ted and Beyond Blues every Wednesday to learn the partner dance that anyone can do! Then dance the night away, no partner required. No experience necessary. Come dance with us.

Wednesdays 7-8pm, with dancing after, till late
$6-$16 sliding scale

OHM Syndicate presents: GRÜV!

Wednesday, September 3rd, 2014 - Thursday, September 4th, 2014, 8:00pm

Parliament
811 Washington St

In Oakland

GRÜV is the newest, freshest house music party in Oakland! Beats are served on THE BEST sound system in the East Bay (seriously, this custom OPUS Audio system ROCKS)!! Cool drink specials; casual vibe; smiles and good people throughout. Every 1st & 3rd Wednesday night in the heart of Old Oakland at Parliament.

Presented to you by:
OHM (Oakland House Music) Syndicate
http://www.instagram.com/GRUVoakland

The People’s Mic (In the Lounge)

Thursday, September 4th, 2014, 7:30pm

La Peña Cultural Center
3105 Shattuck Avenue

In Berkeley

People’s Mic is a monthly event that cultivates expression reflective of its surrounding communities.Open Mic We support work that promotes critical thought, joy and inspiration. Come speak your story, share your poetry or music on the mic. Whether you are a performer or in need of inspiration please contribute your energy to this movement grounded in the power of art! (Limited amount of space on performance list please arrive early to sign up!)

Paint & Pool

Friday, September 5th, 2014 - Saturday, November 1st, 2014

SLATE Contemporary
473 25th St.

In Oakland

Come see our new exhibit featuring work by Bay Area artists Andrzej Michael Karwacki, Victor Cohen Stuart, and Lola. This exhibition highlights these artists' unique approach to painting by showcasing their modern techniques of pooling, dripping, and scraping the paint onto the surface as opposed to the traditional method of using a brush on canvas.

Ho\'okahi Pu\'uwai

Friday, September 5th, 2014 - Monday, September 8th, 2014, 10:00 am - 9:00 pm

EXECUTIVE INN & SUITES OAKLAND
1755 Embarcadero

In Oakland

The Holistic Honu Wellness Center is proud to present our annual Ho’okahi Pu’uwai workshop at the Executive Inn and Suites in Oakland featuring Loea Hula, Frank Kawaikapuokalani K. Hewett and Kumu Kapa, Dalani Tanahy!
This event will be held: Friday, September 5th to Monday, September 8th.
Loea will be presenting one talk-story day (Friday) and two hula instruction days (Saturday & Sunday).
Kumu Dalani will be presenting one abbreviated class (Friday evening) and one full day (Monday). The class size is limited, please enroll early.
Classes will run 10am to 12pm and 2pm to 4pm each day. The class fee is $150 per person per day and includes lunch.
Friday evening’s class will be 5pm to 9pm. The class fee is $50 per person and includes materials.
The Executive Inn & Suites is offering us a room rate of $115. (regular price $135. - $159.) for a City view and $125. (regular price $152. - $179.) for a Water view. The rate is the same for one or two beds. Use “Group Code” GRE310GA
For those of you flying in, the Executive Inn has a free shuttle from the Oakland International Airport.
Hotel amenities include deluxe breakfast, microwaves and mini-refrigerators in the rooms. The bartender fires up the grill every night for some amazing dinners too!
Tickets can be purchased ON-LINE through Eventbrite:
For Loea’s workshops:
http://hookahi2014.eventbrite.com
For Kumu Dalani’s workshops:
https://hawaiiankapa.eventbrite.com
For further details. check our event
website: http://hookahipuuwai.com

Flower Drum Song

Friday, September 5th, 2014 - Sunday, September 14th, 2014, Fri-Sat 8 pm, Thu & Sun 7 pm

Woodminster Amphitheater in Joaquin Miller Park
3300 Joaquin Miller Road

In Oakland

"To create something new, we must first love what is old," claims Mei-Li in Tony Award-winner David Henry Hwang's new adaptation of this Rodgers and Hammerstein jewel. The sentiment is obviously shared by the author himself, who has created something dazzlingly new while honoring the original material. Mei-Li flees Mao's communist China after the murder of her father and finds herself in San Francisco's Chinatown in the mid twentieth century. This naïve young refugee is befriended by Wang, who is struggling to keep the Chinese opera tradition alive despite his son's determination to turn the old opera house into a swingin' Western-style nightclub. A unique blending of American razz-ma-tazz and stylized Chinese opera traditions creates a beautifully theatrical tapestry. The wonderful score, by turns lushly romantic and showbiz-brassy, retains all of its luster in this lovely new version of an American classic. Mei-Li's gradual assimilation is informed by her realization that the old and new can coexist when there is respect for both.

Woodminster Summer Musicals are performed outdoors in historic Woodminster Amphitheater in beautiful Joaquin Miller Park. Come early and enjoy a picnic with your family, a walk in this hillside park, and the beautiful bay views. As the sun sets, take your seats in the amphitheater and enjoy an evening of music and magic under the stars.

Performances Sep 5, 6, 12, 13 at 8 pm and Sep 7, 11, 14 at 7 pm. Tickets $28-$59, discounts for children, seniors, groups. Kids Come Free program lets a child or teen up to 16 years old attend for free with a paying adult.

Preview Sep 4 at 8 pm, all tickets $18 at the door. (No discounts or Kids Come Free)

Portfolio Review

Saturday, September 6th, 2014 - Saturday, September 6th, 2014, 10 am - 4pm

Berkeley Art Center
1275 WALNUT ST

In Berkeley


Sign up to have a 15-minute, one-on-one portfolio review with curators and gallery professionals. Current reviewers are: Chandra Cerrito, Owner,Chandra Cerrito Gallery; Ann Jastrab, Gallery Director, Rayko Photo Center; Aimee Le Duc, Executive Director, Berkeley Art Center.

Free for members with preferred scheduling
$20 for non-members

Space is limited! Reserve your slot today! visit www.berkeleyartcenter.org to register

100 Under 100

Saturday, September 6th, 2014 - Saturday, September 6th, 2014, 7Pm

Studio 23
2309B Encinal Ave

In Oakland

Studio 23 will be showcasing several local east bay area artists in the 100 Under 100 show on Saturday the 6th of September. Everything at this show is priced under one hundred dollars. There will be original work available as well as cards, gifts, t-shirts, magnets, limited edition prints & more.

Chill Jams. Red Wine. Eclectic Mix.

It's a great way to support local art on a tight budget.

Artists: Want to be a part of the show? Visit http://alamedaartists.com/submit_art.cfm to find out how!

This event is not actually in Oakland. It is in Alameda, an island between San Francisco and Oakland. Just a hop, skip, jump from both cities.

ART BREAK DAY

Saturday, September 6th, 2014 - Friday, September 5th, 2014, 9:00am-5:00pm

Street Corner
Shattuck and Vine

In Berkeley

Take an "Art Break" with your community!

Art Break Day takes place ANNUALLY on the FIRST FRIDAY in September. Art Sites are set up in cities around the world and everyone is invited to sit down, take a break, and make art for FREE!
an infographic showing the number of people and sites served by Art Break Day created by Art is Moving

We believe a healthy, vibrant, and well balanced society is one in which everyone regularly participates in the arts. We created Art Break Day to make art accessible to a wider audience and to connect communities through art. Art Break Day is about everyone. We promote the notion that everyone is an artist and can and should create art by making it available in as many locations as possible at one time and offering an open invitation for participation. Not only is everyone given the opportunity to be an artist and create art on Art Break Day, they become a part of the social sculpture that is Art Break Day. Each art space is a blank canvas awaiting human interaction. As each participant chooses to sit down, interact with the space and one another, he acts as a brush stroke on a canvas, changing the composition of the art space, the public space, and adding to the social sculpture's composition. As artworks are created and participants install them where they choose the public space and surrounding environment witness the change. This participation in and observation of artistic creation produces a society that benefits from a culture integrated in art.

Luna Dance Institute Open House

Saturday, September 6th, 2014 - Saturday, September 6th, 2014, 9am-11am

Luna Dance Institute
605 Addison St.

In Berkeley

Dance, play & have fun with your child at Luna Dance Institute's free event! Our fall open house features free creative dance and improvisation classes for all ages. Join us at 9am for dance story time in our professional library followed by free dance classes for young children up to teens. End the morning with a family dance party. Check out our beautiful dance studio located only minutes away from the Berkeley Aquatic Park and Fourth Street shopping center. Fun for all ages!

Lounge Rumba (at La Peña’s LOUNGE every 1st & 3rd Sunday)

Sunday, September 7th, 2014, 3:00pm

La Peña Cultural Center
3105 Shattuck Avenue

In Berkeley

The Sunday Lounge Rumba has been going on at La Peña for the past 12 years and we want to see it continue. We highly encourage participants to donate to ensure that we keep this community participatory event alive!

Come enjoy the Afro-Cuban folkloric drums, dances, and songs of rumba. Rumba is the word used for a group of related, community-oriented, music and dance styles in Cuba. Rumba developed in rural Cuba, with strong influences from African drumming and Spanish poetry and singing.

Donations Encouraged.

Acting workshop with Golden Thread

Sunday, September 7th, 2014 - Sunday, September 28th, 2014, 3:00pm - 6:00pm

La Peña Cultural Center
3105 Shattuck Avenue

In Berkeley

Drawing from plays by Middle Eastern and Middle Eastern American playwrights, this 9-week workshop will enhance the participants’ skills in improvisation, scene study and solo performance. The curriculum will begin with 3 sessions focused on improvisation, physical performance techniques, and stock charcaters rooted in Commedia dell Arte. Participants will apply those skills in the next 4 sessions towards dramatic text analysis, building a character, and physical story-telling. The participants will present their scenes at the final session which will be open to invited guests. By the end of the term, participants will have developed stronger improvisational skills, deeper understanding of dramatic character & text, and more confidence in self-expression.
No prior acting experience required.

Must be 18 or older to participate.
$300

Working with Parents Lesson Study

Tuesday, September 9th, 2014 - Tuesday, September 9th, 2014, 4:30-6PM

Luna Dance Institute
605 Addison Street

In Berkeley

What happens when parents have expectations about how their children "should" be dancing? How can teachers include parents in supporting students' dance learning? Share successes, challenges and lessons-learned from engaging with parents in school and studio settings. Problem-solve and envision with other experts in the field. Cash donations accepted.

John Zurier / MATRIX 255

Friday, September 12th, 2014 - Sunday, December 21st, 2014, Wednesday through Sunday, 11am - 5pm

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
2626 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Berkeley-based artist John Zurier (b. 1956) paints abstract, luminous canvases with hand-mixed pigments that range from subtle, muted earth tones to vibrant, saturated hues. He uses a wide range of brushwork and surface treatments to draw attention to the varied textures of the canvas—often applying distemper (a tempera paint made with dry pigments in animal glue) in thin brushy layers—to capture qualities of light and the changing effects of the atmosphere. He builds compositions that are both simple and involved, paying close attention to all aspects of a painting’s construction, including the differences between cotton and linen surfaces, the weave of each canvas, and the individual properties of tempera versus oil paint. Informed by a wide range of references—Abstract Expressionism, Italian Renaissance painting, Minimalism, Japanese painting, and poetry—Zurier’s work transcends the mundane to enter an affective realm. “I’m very interested in how compositional formats and motifs and even incidents in a painting can trigger perceptual responses and associations,” Zurier says.

Born in Santa Monica, Zurier received both his BA and MFA from the University of California, Berkeley. For MATRIX 255, his first solo exhibition in a museum, Zurier debuts a new body of paintings and watercolors inspired by Iceland, where he has been traveling, teaching, and painting since 2011. Zurier’s abstractions evoke the ice, fog, wind, water, and light of the Icelandic landscape, while also tapping into more timeless, contemplative states. Icy pale blue tones predominate, revealing the infinite range of the hue, as each composition strikes a unique, sensitive chord.

2014 Northern California Renaissance Faire

Saturday, September 13th, 2014 - Sunday, October 12th, 2014, 10:00 a.m. - 6 p.m.

Casa de Fruta
10021 Pacheco Pass Hwy

In

Travel back to a time where the arts flourished, people thirsted for knowledge and the awakening of the mind reigned supreme.

The Northern California Renaissance Faire, happening every weekend from September 13th through October 12th at Casa de Fruta, invites all to experience its traditional Village of Willingtown. Attendees will be transported to the era of Queen Elizabeth I as they watch exotic performances and take part in music and dance from traditional Morris and English Country, to Celtic and Gypsy Tribal.

The Faire is filled with many delightful pleasures and artisan treasures for young and old alike. Visit the Marketplace to see all the master artisans who offer the latest designs and finest hand work in blown glass, keen blades, leather-work, woodwork, jewelry and much more.

Activities, period-themed rides and performances are offered to entertain any and all age groups. Feast your eyes upon pleasures such as face painting, hair-braiding, comedy shows and fortune tellers. You might even be challenged to test your accuracy with a bow and arrow or axe throwing game.

Keep an eye out for courageous knights strapped into their heavy suits of armor as they fight for the Queen’s favor during battles of skill and might. Full contact jousting tournaments are performed twice a day in the World Tournament of Champions arena.

Let your creativity run wild by immersing yourself in Renaissance society. Dress the part by renting a costume inside the gates of The Belrose and throw out as many Huzzahs and Aye’s as you can. The Belrose offers authentic Renaissance garments to complement all taste styles and spanning the social status. You can become anyone you want from prim and proper princesses to swashbuckling pirates to colorful gypsies or royalty.

Jovial peasants, men in tights, and gleeful maidens roam the streets while you sip an ale or cider.

CPR/First Aid Workshop

Saturday, September 13th, 2014 - Saturday, September 13th, 2014, 9:30 AM - 12:30 PM

Luna Dance Institute
605 Addison Street

In Berkeley

This half-day workshop will provide the basic skills to teach safely in any setting. No pre-requisite. $110.

She and Mr. Jones: A Bornday Celebration

Sunday, September 14th, 2014 - Sunday, September 14th, 2014, 2PM - 4PM

Downtown Berkeley BART Plaza
Shattuck Ave.

In Berkeley

September 14th marks the birthday of two contemporary musical legends: Amy Winehouse and Nasir Jones, better known as Nas. Winehouse and Jones revolutionized their respective genres of R&B and Hip-Hop and, as destiny would have it, came together to collaborate in Ms. Winehouse's final years. To celebrate the late Amy Winehouse and Nas, an ensemble of local vocalists, emcees, musicians and poets will be performing a tribute medley.

Performances by:
510traVES
Jus Tess
Karen Less
Mike Fish
Watzreal
Malika Ubaka
J. Slice IX
Skinny
a.K.aye
Hazel Rose

Accompanied by:
Multiple Organisms and DJ Wisecrack the Scribe

Andrew Masullo Gallery Talk: Forrest Bess

Sunday, September 14th, 2014 - Sunday, September 14th, 2014, 3:00pm

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
2626 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Artist Andrew Masullo offers his personal insights into the work of Forrest Bess, who has long been one of his inspirations. Masullo’s own art has been described as ”pure painting” in the New York Times; thirty-four of his paintings were included in the 2012 Whitney Biennial.

Forrest Bess: Seeing Things Invisible pairs Bess’s paintings, dating from 1946 to 1970, with an installation of archival materials curated by sculptor Robert Gober, titled The Man That Got Away, which illuminates Bess’s art and life. The exhibition of this piece at the 2012 Whitney Biennial renewed interest in the magnetic, compelling paintings of Forrest Bess, whose reputation had waned, along with his health, in the 1970s.

Included with BAM/PFA Gallery Admission.
$10.00 – General Admission
$7.00 – Non-UC Berkeley students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled persons; Young adults (13-17)
Free for BAM/PFA members; UC Berkeley Students, faculty, staff, and retirees; Children (12 & under)

Batey Boricua (In the Lounge)

Sunday, September 14th, 2014, 3:00pm

La Peña Cultural Center
3105 Shattuck Avenue

In Berkeley

The Bomba y Plena Workshop presents Batey Boricua! Come jam with us to some bombazo-eventBomba, Plena y Mas como siempre! Invite your family, bring your children and tell your friends. Don’t miss it! No se lo pierdan!

Suggested Donation: $5

BARBARA DANE: A Wild Woman Sings the Blues

Sunday, September 14th, 2014, 8:00pm

La Peña Cultural Center
3105 Shattuck Avenue

In Berkeley

BARBARA DANE: A Wild Woman Sings the Blues

An evening with living legend Barbara Dane & producer Ian Ruskin
This event, celebrating the release of the 2014 radio documentary A Wild Woman Sings the Blues, will feature a couple of songs by Barbara, about 30 minutes of excerpts from the program and a Q&A with Barbara and the producer Ian Ruskin.
Barbara Dane: folk singer, blues singer, jazz singer, social activist, wife, mother, world traveler, feminist, record producer, chronic truant, maverick and general troublemaker. She sang with all the greats, from Pete Seeger to Lightning Hopkins to the Chambers Brothers to Louis Armstrong and more, and travelled the world as an independent woman and musician. The radio documentary A Wild Woman Sings the Blues takes the listener on a journey through this amazing life, from a childhood in Detroit to an eighty-fifth birthday concert at Freight & Salvage in Berkeley. Join us to pay tribute to the legendary Barbara Dane!

http://theharrybridgesproject.org/wwdoc.html
http://www.barbaradane.net/Home.html

Pop-Up Film Festival: Short Films & Big ideas for Sustainable Food and Farming

Wednesday, September 17th, 2014, 6:30pm

La Peña Cultural Center
3105 Shattuck Avenue

In Berkeley

RFMC-Screening-Invite-_-rooftop-editable RFMC-Screening-Invite-_-rooftop-editable-page-0Watch Short Films on Sustainable Food and Farming with Food First!

From oregano farmers in Mexico to seed savers in Canada, beekeepers protecting our food supply to a new generation of farmers, join Food First for a screening of the top ten finalists from the 2014 Real Food Media Contest. The shorts will highlight the diverse stories of the sustainable food and farming movement. Stay after the screening to discuss ideas, strategies, and solutions sparked from the films with Food First!

The contest is the first-ever national competition to celebrate short films about sustainable food and farming. The Real Food Media Project is a collaboration among some of the nation’s leading food and farming organizations joining together to help spread the story of our food with creative movies, this contest, a web-based action center, and grassroots events.

SNEAK PEEK INTO A FEW OF THE SHORT FILMS WE’LL BE SCREENING:
Hands in the Orchestra

Go behind the scenes in San Francisco restaurant kitchens in this rocking short about the hands who feed us. Kevin Longa, Director, Producer, Editor

Our Land: Solution to Pollution

Community members, farmers, and the EPA come together to create thriving farms out of empty lots in this example of citizen-led problem-solving. Severine Fleming, Director, Producer // Jordan Kinley, Editor, Camera

The Gift

Canadian Dan Jason is a pioneer in seed farming who shares his vision of the bounty of nature in this poetically shot short. Jean Marc Abela, Director, Camera, Editor // Senn Annis Producer, Assistant Editor // Matthew Tomlinson, Music

This event is brought to you by Food First as part of our monthly series at La Peña Cultural Center. Every third Wednesday, you’re invited to join

Bay Area Skeptics – An Overview of Human Evolution (In the Lounge)

Thursday, September 18th, 2014, 7:30pm

La Peña Cultural Center
3105 Shattuck Avenue

In Berkeley

This BAS features Dr. Henry Gilbert, Assoc. Professor of Anthropology at CSU East Bay.

Diane Ackerman: The Human Age: The World Shaped By Us

Thursday, September 18th, 2014 - Thursday, September 18th, 2014, 9/18/14, 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM

St. John's Presbyterian Church
2727 College Avenue

In Berkeley

KPFA Radio 94.1FM presents:

Hosted by Vijaya Nagarajan

$12 advance tickets: 800-838-3006 or independent bookstores, $15 door, KPFA benefit www.kpfa.org/events
Co-Sponsored by St. John's Presbyterian Church

"Our relationship with nature has changed...radically, irreversibly, but by no means all for the bad. Our new epoch is laced with invention. Our mistakes are legion, but our talent is immeasurable." - Diane Ackerman

"Diane Ackerman's vivid writing, inexhaustible stock of insights, and unquenchable optimism have established her as a national treasure and as one of our greatest authors...If you haven't read her previous books, you're now about to become addicted to Diane Ackerman."
- Jared Diamond, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Guns, Germs, and Steel

Our finest literary interpreter of science and nature, Ackerman is justly celebrated for her unique insight into the natural world and our place (for better and worse) in it. In this landmark book, she confronts the unprecedented fact that the human race is now the single dominant force of change on the planet. Humans have "subdued 75% of the land surface, concocted a wizardry of industrial and medical marvels, strung lights all across the darkness. We now collect the DNA of vanishing species in a "frozen ark," equip orangutans with iPads, create wearable technologies and synthetic species that might one day outsmart us.

Diane Ackerman has been the finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for Nonfiction. She is the author of The Zookeeper's Wife, A Natural History of the Senses, An Alchemy of Mind, Jaguar of Sweet Laughter, Dawn Light, and One Hundred Names for Love, among many other exceptional books.

Professor Vijaya Nagarajan teaches courses on Hinduism, Religion and Environment, Spiritual Autobiography, and Community Internships. Her other research projects include: On the Languages of the Commons; Tree Temples, Mangroves and Temple Forests.

Presented by KPFA Radio 94.1 FM.

$12 advance, $15 door.

2014 Pleasanton Harvest Festival

Friday, September 19th, 2014 - Sunday, September 21st, 2014, 10am - 6pm

Alameda County Fairgrounds
4501 Pleasanton Ave

In

The Pleasanton Harvest Festival, one of the top rated craft shows in the country, will return to the Alameda County Fairgrounds September 19-21, 2014. The event will offer over 24,000 American handmade arts and crafts. Attendees can shop original art, jewelry, clothing, specialty foods, home decor and more.

Throughout the weekend there are live musical performances, strolling entertainers, a hands on KidZone, delicious foods and fabulous prize giveaways. Once at the show, attendees can enter to win an ipad mini which will be awarded the last day of the event.

Plus, anyone who brings a non-perishable food donation to support the Alameda County Community Food Bank will receive $2 off one general or senior admission.

Don\'t miss a full day of shopping, entertainment and good old fashioned family fun at the Pleasanton Harvest Festival.

L@TE: Pharaohs: Oasiics

Friday, September 19th, 2014 - Friday, September 19th, 2014, 7:30pm

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
2626 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Since 2008, Los Angeles–based Pharaohs (Sam Cooper, Alejandro Cohen, and their collaborators) have journeyed from sound-bending investigations to unstoppable dance-floor dominance. Get loose and bust a move to drum machine and live percussion, synthesizer and saxophone, dub delay and surf guitar.
Programmed by Andy Cabic.

$7.00 General Admission.
Free for BAM/PFA Members and UC Berkeley students, faculty, and staff.

Conversation with Christian Frock and Megan Wilson

Saturday, September 20th, 2014 - Saturday, September 20th, 2014, 4 - 6 p.m.

Berkeley Art Center
1275 Walnut St.

In Berkeley

Christian Frock, art writer and curator, and artist Megan Wilson will discuss public space, gentrification and the rapidly changing art scene in the Bay Area.

Christian L. Frock is an independent writer and curator whose practice interrogates the intersection of art, daily life and popular culture through a consideration of art in public spaces. Her curatorial enterprise, Invisible Venue, collaborates with artists to present art in unexpected settings. She recently began a series of articles: Priced Out: San Francisco's Changing Values and Artist Exodus.

Megan Wilson's installations and public projects use the aesthetics and methodologies of popular culture to comment on socio-economic issues such as capitalism, displacement, homelessness, corporate corruption and gentrification. Her recent focus has been on the dislocation of artists and arts non profits in San Francisco. Read her article: The Gentrification of Our Livelihoods: Everything Must Go...

FREE: donations appreciated

Conversation with Christian Frock and Megan Wilson

Saturday, September 20th, 2014 - Saturday, September 20th, 2014, 4 - 6pm

Berkeley Art Center
1275 Walnut Street

In Berkeley

Christian Frock, art writer and curator, and artist Megan Wilson will discuss public space, gentrification, and the rapidly changing art scene in the Bay Area.

Conversation with Christian Frock and Megan Wilson

Saturday, September 20th, 2014, 4-6pm

Berkeley Art Center
1275 WALNUT ST

In Berkeley

Christian Frock and Megan Wilson will come together to talk about the recent and rapid changes happening in the Bay Area’s cultural community and how it is effecting housing, work spaces and art making as a whole. Moderated by Aimee Le Duc

Christian L. Frock is an independent writer and curator based in the Bay Area. Frock's practice interrogates the intersection of art, daily life and popular culture through a consideration of art in public spaces. Invisible Venue, the curatorial enterprise founded and directed by Frock since 2005, collaborates with artists to present art in unexpected settings. Megan Wilson is a visual artist based out of San Francisco. Wilson’s large-scale installations and public projects utilize a broad range of pop culture methodologies and aesthetics as a point of entry and engagement for the issues she addresses conceptually.

Part of the Conversations@BAC lecture series

Dwinelle Hall Breakers Break-Dancing Workshop

Saturday, September 20th, 2014, 4:00-6:00pm

La Peña Cultural Center
3105 Shattuck Avenue

In Berkeley

$5 at the door.

Workshop Details: Created within house parties during the 1970s in New York City, Breakin has since then evolved into a global phenomenon. This 2 hour workshop will introduce students to fundamental techniques of the dance style (toprock, 6-step, basic freezes) as well as explore the socio-economic context from which the dance was born and how it serves as a tool for self-discovery, artistic expression, personal empowerment, and community building.

About DHB: Dwinelle Hall Breakers is a CAL campus organization founded in 2012 promoting community building through grassroots Hip-Hop values; peace, love, unity, and having fun. Prior to it’s official recognition as a student club it had already built a 20 year legacy throughout the Bay Area/Worldwide b-boy/b-girl community in providing an all-inclusive space welcoming dancers to cultivate their art forms and advance their skills. Members of the club have fostered a global community with various countries such as Brazil, China, Taiwan, Korea, Thailand, Vietnam, Germany, France, Denmark, Philippines, Argentina, Cambodia, and Colombia as well as throughout the United States. The members of DHB share their passion for dance via workshops, performances, events, and facilitating the bboy/bgirl decal on campus, a student-to-student taught course that is offered throughout each semester.

Stand Up Sit Down

Saturday, September 20th, 2014, 8:00pm

La Peña Cultural Center
3105 Shattuck Avenue

In Berkeley

“Stand Up Sit Down” is a live stand-up comedy and sit-down interview show hosted by socio-political comedians, Karinda Dobbins and Dhaya Lakshminarayanan. Imagine if renegade comedians locked Wolf Blitzer in a broom closet and then ran CNN’s “Situation Room.” You would have the Stand Up Sit Down” show. Hosts Dobbins and Lakshminarayanan will join fellow comics on stage to cover weighty topics with a light touch. The show will culminate in a humorous discussion between the hosts and a subversive interview guest, who might be an activist, entrepreneur, artist, politician, professor, or superhero.

$12 Adv, $15 Door

Berkeley Symphony and Friends Chamber Music Series

Sunday, September 21st, 2014 - Sunday, September 21st, 2014, 5-7pm

Piedmont Center for the Arts
801 Magnolia Avenue, Piedmont, CA 94611

In

The Piedmont Center for the Arts will host a series of four chamber music concerts featuring Berkeley Symphony musicians and their guests. Stuart Canin, violin; Bonnie Hampton, cello; Sarah Cahill, piano. Presenting works by Thomas Adès, Beethoven, and Schubert.

Sugar in the Salt: Eli Conley, Koralie “K Sugar” Hill, and Maia Papaya

Sunday, September 21st, 2014, 8:00pm-10:00pm

La Peña Cultural Center
3105 Shattuck Avenue

In Berkeley

La Peña welcomes our friends songwriters Eli Conley, Koralie Hill (The Skinny String Band) and Maia Papaya (Hip for Squares) as they debut their new indie folk trio, Sugar in the Salt. Opening the show will be Lost Angeles acoustic duo The Velopheliacs, on tour celebrating the release of their debut album, Hinterlands.

Sugar in the Salt is a newly formed indie folk trio featuring songwriters Eli Conley (guitar, vocals), Koralie “K Sugar” Hill (accordion, banjo, fiddle, vocals) and Maia “Papaya” Wiitala (upright bass, guitar, vocals). With their luscious three-part harmonies and swelling strings, these three friends serve up songs that will touch your salty heart and sugar up your funny bone.

Members of Sugar in the Salt have graced stages across the Bay Area including the Freight and Salvage, Cafe du Nord, and the San Francisco Trans March, not to mention countless livings rooms and protest rallies. Now they are joining forces as a queer folk band that just wants to have fun!

When Sugar in the Salt gets together to play, you can always count on a sweet time!

Make Space: Opening Reception

Tuesday, September 23rd, 2014 - Saturday, August 23rd, 2014, 5pm-8pm

Berkeley Art Center
1275 Walnut St., Berkeley, CA 94118

In Berkeley

Berkeley Art Center is thrilled to present Make Space, a group exhibition featuring new and existing work by, Randy Dixon, Nancy Ivanhoe, Tressa Pack, Erik Parra, Dimitra Skandali. This show challenges artists to re-contextualize their art practice within the walls of the Berkeley Art Center; an art space like no other in the Bay Area.

During a time of dramatic economic and cultural shifts in the Bay Area, art spaces are closing, moving and utterly transforming in order to adapt to the changing financial and social changes of the region. However the Berkeley Art Center is a site fixed within Live Oak Park in North Berkeley. What relationship does the site of the Center, situated in a beautiful city park, have to the artwork within it? How can we consider what this art space means and how it functions within the great arts community?

Randy Dixon’s sculptures of unrealized and unrealizable houses and buildings use the language of architecture to lure us into considering how the space around us is constructed. Dimitra Skandali and Nancy Ivanhoe, in addition to showing their own singular sculptures and installations, will be collaborating on a series of line drawings, drawn directly onto the walls, grounds and floors of BAC, that will follow the lines and shadows created by the trees in Live Oak Park beginning at the front entrance of the building and moving throughout the gallery and out to the sculpture garden. Tressa Pack’s photographs of photography equipment set up to light and frame an empty space creates an eerie value system for the ‘spacelessness’ filling up the rest of her compositions. Erik Parra will show new paintings of landscape and domestic interiors situated inside an installation of a room that could easily exist inside his paintings.

BAC executive director, Aimee Le Duc notes, “The artists in Make Space are confronting architecture as both subject and object. They will incorporate Berkeley Art Center into their installations and work – including

Discussion Forum: Mississippi Freedom Summer

Wednesday, September 24th, 2014, 6:30pm

La Peña Cultural Center
3105 Shattuck Avenue

In Berkeley

Join us for a discussion forum – Mississippi Freedom Summer.

TMI Storytelling (In the Lounge)

Thursday, September 25th, 2014, 7:30pm

La Peña Cultural Center
3105 Shattuck Avenue

In Berkeley

Known as the host of her own ground-breaking comedy-sketch show, Bay Area comedian storytelling series Gina Gold presents TMI Storytelling: Raw Stories, Real Spit, a monthly storytelling series.

Raw stories and real spit rule the mic during “TMI Storytelling”, an unpolished monthly show on funny, provocative topics. Bay Area comedian Gina Gold presents this comedic series which features a rotating cast of storytellers giving a unadulterated, often hard-core look at life. You’ll hear tales of heartbreak and woe, peppered with humorous asides and serious commentary from a different lineup each show. As host, Gold will keep the heartfelt and brutally honest show flowing.

$10.00 in advance

$13.00 at the door

For more info: http://tmistorytelling.com/

RE@DS: Lucy Corin & Alix Lambert

Friday, September 26th, 2014 - Friday, September 26th, 2014, 5:30pm

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
2626 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Readings by Lucy Corin and Alix Lambert.

Lucy Corin is the author of the short story collections One Hundred Apocalypses and Other Apocalypses (McSweeney's Books) and The Entire Predicament (Tin House Books) and the novel Everyday Psychokillers: A History for Girls (FC2). Her stories have appeared in American Short Fiction, Conjunctions, Ploughshares, Tin House Magazine, and elsewhere. She’s been a fellow at Breadloaf and Sewanee, and spent 2012–13 at the American Academy in Rome as the John Guare Fellow in Literature.

Alix Lambert directed and produced the feature-length documentaries The Mark of Cain, Bayou Blue, and Mentor. She is cocreator and codirector of Crime: The Animated Series, and creator, writer, director of the Ambiance Man series (starring Fred Armisen), both for MOCAtv. As an artist Lambert has exhibited her work to international critical acclaim. She is the author of four books: Mastering The Melon, The Silencing, Russian Prison Tattoos, and Crime. Lambert cofounded and is coartistic director of The Brooklyn International Theater Company.

RE@DS is included with L@TE admission.
$7.00 General Admission.
Free for BAM/PFA Members and UC Berkeley students, faculty, and staff.


L@TE: William Winant Percussion Group

Friday, September 26th, 2014 - Friday, September 26th, 2014, 7:30pm

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
2626 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Master percussionist William Winant and his cohorts return to L@TE with a program of pioneering percussion music. Don’t miss this chance to hear Steve Reich’s groundbreaking, thunderous work Drumming (Parts One and Two), along with other works by Reich, Lou Harrison, Johanna Beyer, and James Tenney, in the reverberant volume of BAM/PFA.
Programmed by Sarah Cahill.

$7.00 General Admission.
Free for BAM/PFA Members and UC Berkeley students, faculty, and staff.

Renee Bott: Printing With Diebenkorn

Sunday, September 28th, 2014 - Sunday, September 28th, 2014, 1:30 - 3pm

Richmond Art Center
2540 Barrett Ave

In Richmond

Join Renee Bott, co-founder of Paulson-Bott Press, for accounts of masterly pursuits in the printmaking studio as she shares stories of working with Richard Diebenkorn when she at Crown Point Press.

Mexican Tardeada (In the Lounge)

Sunday, September 28th, 2014, 3:00pm

La Peña Cultural Center
3105 Shattuck Avenue

In Berkeley

A monthly Sunday afternoon Mexican music jam in the café lounge. The Tardeadas are informal family-oriented gathering of musicians and Mexican music aficionados. Bring your Tejano/Norteño acordeon, guitar, bass, bajo, or percussion y aquí nos vemos!

Free/Donations requested

American Wonder: Folk Art from the Collection

Wednesday, October 1st, 2014 - Sunday, December 21st, 2014, Wednesday through Sunday, 11am - 5pm

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
2626 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

American Wonder: Folk Art from the Collection captures our burgeoning nation during a time of enormous change, from the Declaration of Independence in 1776 to the onset of the Civil War in 1861. The exhibition includes approximately fifty portraits, landscapes, commemorative mourning pictures, weather vanes, and decorative sculptures from the BAM/PFA collection. This distinguished collection—one of the finest of American folk art in California—is due to the generosity of W.B. Carnochan and N.C. Edebo.

In the years just following the Revolutionary War, many newly minted Americans desired painted portraits for their homes in order to identify individuals, establish family legacy, and demonstrate personal and/or civic achievement. Artists usually chose to portray their subjects in conventional poses, with the greatest emphasis placed on individual facial features. Clothing and surroundings were often simple and stylized, but might include details that would have been understood at the time as signs of social status or phase of life.

The exhibition also includes a number of landscapes, ranging from pastoral scenes to views of industrial progress. View of Providence, Rhode Island, created in the mid-1820s by an unidentified artist, functions as a portrait; the coastal city is portrayed on the brink of transition from pioneer village to bustling center of commerce. With remarkable beauty and formal simplicity, the works of art in American Wonder evoke the vivid presentness of their subjects and makers.

American Wonder Folk Art Curator's Gallery Talk

Thursday, October 2nd, 2014 - Thursday, October 2nd, 2014, 12:15pm

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
2626 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Exhibition organizer Lucinda Barnes, chief curator and director of programs and collections, leads an informative tour of American Wonder: Folk Art from the Collection.

American Wonder: Folk Art from the Collection captures our burgeoning nation during a time of enormous change, from the Declaration of Independence in 1776 to the onset of the Civil War in 1861. The exhibition includes approximately fifty portraits, landscapes, commemorative mourning pictures, weather vanes, and decorative sculptures from the BAM/PFA collection. This distinguished collection—one of the finest of American folk art in California—is due to the generosity of W.B. Carnochan and N.C. Edebo.

The exhibition also includes a number of landscapes, ranging from pastoral scenes to views of industrial progress. View of Providence, Rhode Island, created in the mid-1820s by an unidentified artist, functions as a portrait; the coastal city is portrayed on the brink of transition from pioneer village to bustling center of commerce. With remarkable beauty and formal simplicity, the works of art in American Wonder evoke the vivid presentness of their subjects and makers.

Included with BAM/PFA Gallery Admission.
$10.00 – General Admission
$7.00 – Non-UC Berkeley students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled persons; Young adults (13-17)
Free for BAM/PFA members; UC Berkeley Students, faculty, staff, and retirees; Children (12 & under)

Berkeley Symphony: Enigma

Thursday, October 2nd, 2014 - Thursday, October 2nd, 2014, 7-9pm

Zellerbach Hall
101 Zellerbach Hall #4800, Berkeley, CA 94720

In Berkeley

The new season opens with the world premiere performance of Oscar Bettison’s Sea Shaped, commissioned by Berkeley Symphony. Born in the UK, Bettison is best known for his willingness to work within and outside the confines of concert music. Violinist Jennifer Koh returns to Berkeley to perform the Sibelius Violin Concerto with the Orchestra. A favorite with Berkeley audiences, Ms. Koh is recognized for her intense, commanding performances, delivered with dazzling virtuosity and technical assurance. The evening ends with Edward Elgar’s stirring Enigma Variations. Premiered in 1899, Elgar dedicated the piece to “my friends pictured within”, each variation being an affectionate portrayal of one of his circle of close acquaintances.

Bliss Carnochan Gallery Talk: American Wonder Folk Art

Sunday, October 5th, 2014 - Sunday, October 5th, 2014, 3:00pm

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
2626 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Bliss Carnochan, who collected the works on view in American Wonder with Nancy Edebo between 1966 and 1975, shares his passion for and knowledge of American folk art in this informal gallery talk. Carnochan, Richard W. Lyman Professor of Humanities, Emeritus at Stanford University, will discuss selected portraits, landscapes, sculptures, and commemorative mourning pictures, and address the complex status of folk art per se and as a field for collecting.

Carnochan’s own interest in folk art began in the 1950s when he saw reproduced in a Boston newspaper a compelling family portrait by the New England artist Erastus Salisbury Field, then just acquired by the Boston Museum of Fine Arts.

American Wonder: Folk Art from the Collection captures our burgeoning nation during a time of enormous change, from the Declaration of Independence in 1776 to the onset of the Civil War in 1861. The exhibition includes approximately fifty portraits, landscapes, commemorative mourning pictures, weather vanes, and decorative sculptures from the BAM/PFA collection. This distinguished collection—one of the finest of American folk art in California—is due to the generosity of W.B. Carnochan and N.C. Edebo.

The exhibition also includes a number of landscapes, ranging from pastoral scenes to views of industrial progress. View of Providence, Rhode Island, created in the mid-1820s by an unidentified artist, functions as a portrait; the coastal city is portrayed on the brink of transition from pioneer village to bustling center of commerce. With remarkable beauty and formal simplicity, the works of art in American Wonder evoke the vivid presentness of their subjects and makers.

Included with BAM/PFA Gallery Admission.
$10.00 – General Admission
$7.00 – Non-UC Berkeley students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled persons; Young adults (13-17)
Free for BAM/PFA members; UC Berkeley Students, faculty, staff, and retirees; Children (12 & under)

TAI MURRAY, Violinist

Saturday, October 11th, 2014 - Saturday, October 11th, 2014, 7:30pm

Regents Theatre, Holy Names University
3500 Mountain Blvd

In Oakland

Appreciated for her elegance and effortless ability, Tai Murray creates a special bond with listeners through her mature phrasing and subtle sweetness. Her programming reveals musical intelligence. Her sound reflects sophisticated bowing and a perfect choice of vibrato.

Program--

Schubert: Rondo D. 895
Arvo Part: Spiegel im Spiegel; Fratres
Debussy: Violin Sonata in G Minor
Corigliano: Violin Sonata (1963)

RE@DS: Gabrielle Calvocoressi & Maggie Nelson

Friday, October 17th, 2014 - Friday, October 17th, 2014, 5:30pm

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
2626 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Readings by Gabrielle Calvocoressi and Maggie Nelson.

Gabrielle Calvocoressi is the author of The Last Time I Saw Amelia Earhart and Apocalyptic Swing. Her poems have been featured in The New York Times, Boston Review, The Washington Post, on Garrison Keillor's Poet's Almanac, and in numerous journals. Her awards and fellowships include The Paris Review's Bernard F. Conners Prize, a Rona Jaffe Woman Writers Award, a Stegner Fellowship and Jones Lectureship from Stanford University, a Civitella di Ranieri fellowship, and a Lannan Foundation Residency Fellowship. She is the senior poetry editor for The Los Angeles Review of Books. She is on the faculty of the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, where she is the Walker Percy Fellow in Poetry.

Maggie Nelson is a poet, scholar, critic, and creative nonfiction writer. Her books of nonfiction include The Art of Cruelty: A Reckoning; Bluets; Women, the New York School, and Other True Abstractions; and The Red Parts: A Memoir. Her books of poetry include Something Bright, Then Holes; Jane: A Murder; The Latest Winter; and Shiner. Her book The Argonauts is forthcoming from Graywolf Press in May 2015. Her awards include an Innovative Literature Fellowship from Creative Capital, an NEA Fellowship, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and an Arts Writers grant from the Andy Warhol Foundation. She is on the faculty of the School of Critical Studies at CalArts.

RE@DS is included with L@TE admission.
$7.00 General Admission.
Free for BAM/PFA Members and UC Berkeley students, faculty, and staff.


Joseph Holtzman / MATRIX 256: Artist's Talk

Friday, October 17th, 2014 - Friday, October 17th, 2014, 6:30pm

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
2626 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Artist Joseph Holtzman discusses his strikingly original paintings in this overview of his work.

Joseph Holtzman’s unusual artistic sensibility evolved from his close study of historical painting and his connoisseurship of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century decorative arts. His themes and motifs draw on these diverse sources as well as allude to family and friends, cultural personalities, historical figures, and literary characters. Balancing his wide-ranging references is an intensely sensual connection to paint and surface.

Holtzman (b. 1957) is highly attentive to the unique qualities of color and texture that can be expressed through the medium of paint on various grounds. His palette is fantastically rich and varied and he achieves remarkable chromatic and tonal effects by exploiting not only the transparency of the oil medium but also the unusual capacity of marble—his favorite surface—to absorb and reflect light. He pays as much attention to the tiniest details of the paintings as he does to their overall compositions. To contemplate Holtzman’s paintings is to become immersed—indeed, nearly lost—in a strange yet beautiful universe.

Included with BAM/PFA Gallery Admission.
$10.00 – General Admission
$7.00 – Non-UC Berkeley students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled persons; Young adults (13-17)
Free for BAM/PFA members; UC Berkeley Students, faculty, staff, and retirees; Children (12 & under)

L@TE: Andy Cabic and Devendra Banhart

Friday, October 17th, 2014 - Friday, October 17th, 2014, 7:30pm

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
2626 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Longtime friends and musical collaborators Andy Cabic (Vetiver) and Devendra Banhart grab a couple of guitars and turn our atrium gallery into an intimate performance space. These two singer-songwriters formed the vanguard of an experimental and folk-influenced aesthetic that emerged in the Bay Area around the turn of the millennium. They will perform both individually and together, in a casual mix of older and newer material from their deep catalogs.
Programmed by Andy Cabic.

$7.00 General Admission.
Free for BAM/PFA Members and UC Berkeley students, faculty, and staff.

Joseph Holtzman / MATRIX 256

Friday, October 17th, 2014 - Sunday, December 21st, 2014, Wednesday through Sunday, 11am - 5pm

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
2626 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Joseph Holtzman’s unusual artistic sensibility evolved from his close study of historical painting and his connoisseurship of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century decorative arts. His themes and motifs draw on these diverse sources as well as allude to family and friends, cultural personalities, historical figures, and literary characters. Balancing his wide-ranging references is an intensely sensual connection to paint and surface.

Holtzman (b. 1957) is highly attentive to the unique qualities of color and texture that can be expressed through the medium of paint on various grounds. His palette is fantastically rich and varied and he achieves remarkable chromatic and tonal effects by exploiting not only the transparency of the oil medium but also the unusual capacity of marble—his favorite surface—to absorb and reflect light. He pays as much attention to the tiniest details of the paintings as he does to their overall compositions. To contemplate Holtzman’s paintings is to become immersed—indeed, nearly lost—in a strange yet beautiful universe.

Many of Holtzman’s paintings are portraits though their subjects may only emerge for him in the process of painting: Frieda (Holtzman’s mother), Monsieur de Charlus (the dissolute aristocrat in Proust’s In Search of Lost Time), Mary Todd Lincoln (“a driven decorator,” according to Holtzman), the composer Stephen Sondheim, and Holtzman’s husband, Carl Skoggard. These subjects are evoked less through accurate depictions of their bodies and faces than through settings and related objects that, like saintly “attributes,” convey symbolic meaning.

Through his highly personal and inventive engagement with painting, Holtzman has invested new life into this versatile medium while nodding to the admired forebears of his, and our, cultural past.

RE@DS: Brian Teare & Rocket Caleshu

Friday, October 24th, 2014 - Friday, October 24th, 2014, 5:30pm

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
2626 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Readings by Brian Teare and Rocket Caleshu.

A former Stegner Fellow at Stanford University, Brian Teare is the recipient of poetry fellowships from the MacDowell Colony, Headlands Center for the Arts, and the American Antiquarian Society. He’s the author of four critically acclaimed books: The Room Where I Was Born, Sight Map, the Lambda Award–winning Pleasure, and Companion Grasses, one of Slate’s best poetry books of 2013 and a finalist for the Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award. An assistant professor at Temple University, he lives in Philadelphia where he makes books by hand for his micropress, Albion Books.

Rocket Caleshu, born in San Francisco in 1984, is an M.F.A. candidate in creative writing in the Critical Studies Department at the California Institute of the Arts. Rocket is also a letterpress printer and book artist, and received an A.B. from Brown University in Africana Studies.

RE@DS is included with L@TE admission.
$7.00 General Admission.
Free for BAM/PFA Members and UC Berkeley students, faculty, and staff.


L@TE: Splinter Reeds

Friday, October 24th, 2014 - Friday, October 24th, 2014, 7:30pm

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
2626 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

This all-star quintet of Bay Area musicians breathes new life into contemporary music for woodwinds and blows audiences away. Not your grandmother’s woodwind quintet, Splinter Reeds adds bass clarinet and saxophone to the mix to create a more robust and dynamic sound. They premiere a new work by composer Marc Mellits, among other music written specifically for the ensemble.
Programmed by Sarah Cahill.

$7.00 General Admission.
Free for BAM/PFA Members and UC Berkeley students, faculty, and staff.

JEANNE STARK, Pianist

Saturday, October 25th, 2014 - Saturday, October 25th, 2014, 4:00pm

First Presbyterian Church, Berkeley
2407 Dana Street

In Berkeley

Program: The first half is all about water...

Ravel: Jeux d'eau(Playing water)
Debussy: Jardins Sous La Pluie(Gardens in the Rain)(Estampes, No.3)
Debussy: Reflets dans l'eau(Reflections in the Water)(Images, Book1, No.1)
Debussy: La cathedrale engloutie(The Sunken Cathedral)(Preludes, Book 1, No. 10)

Beethoven: Sonata No. 30 in E Major, Op. 109

Berkeley Symphony: Meet the Symphony Family Concert

Saturday, November 1st, 2014 - Saturday, November 1st, 2014, 10am and 11:30am

Malcom X Elementary School
1731 Prince Street

In Berkeley

Don’t miss these entertaining and interactive concerts introducing the various musical instruments of the orchestra. Delight in the wild antics of conductor Ming Luke and his special guest(s) as they engage and enlighten young audience members to the world of music. Fun for all ages! Concert is FREE!

Berkeley Symphony and Friends Chamber Music Series

Sunday, November 9th, 2014 - Sunday, November 9th, 2014, 5-7pm

Piedmont Center for the Arts
801 Magnolia Avenue, Piedmont, CA 94611

In

The Piedmont Center for the Arts will host a series of four chamber music concerts featuring Berkeley Symphony musicians and their guests. Artists: Franklyn D'Antonio, violin; Roman Fukshansky, clarinet; Eric Gaenslen, cello; Miles Graber, piano. Presenting works by John Adams, Bartók, and Brahms. Tickets are $25.

Berkeley Symphony: Sanctuary

Thursday, January 15th, 2015 - Thursday, January 15th, 2015, 8-10pm

Zellerbach Hall
101 Zellerbach Hall #4800, Berkeley, CA 94720

In Berkeley

Commissioned by the City of Birmingham Orchestra, Asyla was given its premiere in 1997, under the baton of Sir Simon Rattle. As is typical of Adès, the title implies both a place of rest and a home for the mentally unstable, capturing the subversive tone of the piece. Berkeley Symphony is honored to introduce Bay Area audiences to this important work. One of the best-loved works in the classical music repertoire, Tchaikovsky’s “Pathétique” Symphony premiered in October of 1843, conducted by the composer, only nine days prior to his death. Its rich melodies and passionate romanticism remain profoundly moving and provide a welcome escape from 21st century realism.

Berkeley Symphony and Friends Chamber Music Series

Sunday, February 8th, 2015 - Sunday, February 8th, 2015, 5-7pm

Piedmont Center for the Arts
801 Magnolia Avenue, Piedmont, CA 94611

In

The Piedmont Center for the Arts will host a series of four chamber music concerts featuring Berkeley Symphony musicians and their guests. Artists: René Mandel, violin; Peter Wyrick, cello; Markus Pawlik, piano. Presenting works by Mozart and Tchaikovsky.

Berkeley Symphony: Imagination

Thursday, February 26th, 2015 - Thursday, February 26th, 2015, 8-10pm

Zellerbach Hall
101 Zellerbach Hall #4800, Berkeley, CA 94720

In Berkeley

Maurice Ravel’s delightful Mother Goose Suite opens the program. A series of illustrations of French fairy tales was the inspiration behind this piece, which started out as a piano duet, then was expanded to a ballet, from which this orchestra suite was derived. Jake Heggie’s Camille Claudel: Into the Fire was premiered to great acclaim as a song cycle for mezzo-soprano and string quartet in San Francisco in 2012. Berkeley Symphony commissioned Mr. Heggie to write the orchestral version, which receives its world premiere with the enchanting Sasha Cooke as soloist. This performance closes with Brahms’ powerful Fourth Symphony, completed only a year after the premiere of his Third Symphony.

Berkeley Symphony: I'm a Performer Family Concert

Saturday, April 11th, 2015 - Saturday, April 11th, 2015, 10am and 11:30am

Malcom X Middle School
1731 Prince Street

In Berkeley

Rosin your bow and polish your horn! Get ready for this one-of-a-kind opportunity to perform alongside professional orchestra musicians! An annual tradition at Berkeley Symphony, “I’m a Performer!” family concerts are open to all music lovers, instrumentalists and singers alike. Together, you and the orchestra will perform popular tunes, including “Ode to Joy” and our signature tune, “I Am a Fine Musician.” Concerts are FREE.

Berkeley Symphony and Friends Chamber Music Series

Sunday, April 12th, 2015 - Sunday, April 12th, 2015, 5-7pm

Piedmont Center for the Arts
801 Magnolia Avenue, Piedmont, CA 94611

In

The Piedmont Center for the Arts will host a series of four chamber music concerts featuring Berkeley Symphony musicians and their guests. Artists: Dan Flanagan, violin; Elizabeth Prior, viola; Jonah Kim, cello; Miles Graber, piano. Presenting works by Ravel and Fauré. Tickets are $25.

Berkeley Symphony: Homage

Thursday, April 30th, 2015 - Thursday, April 30th, 2015, 8-10pm

Zellerbach Hall
101 Zellerbach Hall #4800, Berkeley, CA 94720

In Berkeley

First produced in 1991, John Adams’ opera The Death of Klinghoffer is based on the hijacking of the passenger liner Achille Lauro by the Palestine Liberation Front in 1995, and the resulting murder of Jewish-American passenger Leon Klinghoffer. Mozart’s Requiem was composed in Vienna in 1791, during the last year of the composer’s life. Though considered one of Mozart’s most popular and respected works, the question remains as to how much of the music he actually completed before his death and how much was later composed by others. The Orchestra is joined by soloists from the Adler Fellowship Program of the San Francisco Opera Center and the choruses from the University of California, Berkeley.

Under Construction

Saturday, May 2nd, 2015 - Saturday, May 2nd, 2015, 3pm

Osher Studio
2055 Center Street

In Berkeley

Working in collaboration with EarShot: the National Orchestral Composition Discovery Network, and its partner organizations – the American Composers Forum, League of American Orchestras, New Music USA and the American Composers Orchestra – Berkeley Symphony will expand its Under Construction New Music Series/Composers Program. Participating composers receive artistic and career guidance from Music Director Joana Carneiro and mentor composers, as well as from the orchestra musicians. Tickets are $10.

Under Construction II

Sunday, May 3rd, 2015 - Sunday, May 3rd, 2015, 7-9pm

Osher Studio
2055 Center Street

In Berkeley

Working in collaboration with EarShot: the National Orchestral Composition Discovery Network, and its partner organizations – the American Composers Forum, League of American Orchestras, New Music USA and the American Composers Orchestra – Berkeley Symphony will expand its Under Construction New Music Series/Composers Program. Participating composers receive artistic and career guidance from Music Director Joana Carneiro and mentor composers, as well as from the orchestra musicians.



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