Events


THE CORPORATION: NEW WORK BY DAN NELSON

Saturday, August 26th, 2017 - Sunday, October 15th, 2017, Wed - Sun 12-7pm

THE CORPORATION
1167 65th st. Oakland, CA 94608

In Oakland

An Interdisciplinary exhibition of corporate culture and perception. Check out #thecorporationart on Instagram to follow Dan’s progress and inspiration.

The conceptual artist and author of the McSweeney’s book “All Known Metal Bands” explores the culture and aesthetics of the world of corporations and day jobs in a wide-ranging interdisciplinary show.

Based on Nelson’s experience working at a successful start-up in Emeryville from 2009-2015, the show explores the culture and aesthetics of the corporate world in a wide-ranging show with over 120 works of video, photography, sound art, text-based works, posters, sculptures, interactive pieces, and paintings.

A limited-edition 64-page book of the same name will be launched at the show’s opening, which includes photographs taken in offices and warehouses, corporate haiku written during long meetings, spam email promotions, digital collages, office humor, and more.

The book and the gallery show highlight a number of current themes in American life: corporatism, neo-liberalism, greed, boredom, chaos, futility, plastic, cardboard, dysfunctional hierarchies, and the color beige.

About: Dan Nelson is an interdisciplinary artist, musician, and author who plays with words, symbols, signals, and sounds to explore how humans communicate and create meaning. His large-scale, multifaceted work includes video, photography, sound art, text-based works, sculptures, and painting. His most well-known work is “All Known Metal Bands,” a 300-page list of 51,000 heavy metal band names published by McSweeney’s. He has been involved in the Oakland art scene since 2002, and lives and works in Oakland, California.

"NYC&T"(New York City & Tom) Exhibit

Tuesday, August 29th, 2017 - Saturday, October 21st, 2017, 11:00 am - 6:00 pm

Art Thou Gallery
1533 Solano Avenue

In Berkeley

"NYC & T" (New York City & Tom) is an artist’s homage to the “Dirty, Gritty & Dreamlike Elements All Swirled Into One” That Showcase the Spirits of New York City. This multi-media exhibition incorporates an exciting range of mixed artistic styles. These different components serve to immerse and elevate the experience of the viewer in becoming a part of the NYC cityscape.

Paintings, sculptures, and photographs featured include; "Hells Kitchen", "Rockefeller at Night", "New York Central", “Bridge”, "Girl Eating Hotdog" and "The Subway" installation. Visitors to the "NYC & T" exhibit will leave the Art Thou Gallery feeling like they have just been in the New York City culture-scape.

The works described are just a small fraction of the almost fifty art pieces displayed in the NYC & T exhibition. Entrance is FREE

A closing reception for NYC & T will be held on Saturday, October 14th from 7:00 pm to 11:00 pm

Developing and Implementing Dance Curricula-B

Tuesday, August 29th, 2017 - Tuesday, December 5th, 2017, 6-9 pm/ Tuesday Evenings

Luna Dance Institute
605 Addison Street

In Berkeley

August 29th- December 5th
Tuesday evenings, 6-9 pm, $525

Level 2 of a 4-level foundations series, continuing from DIDC-A, this course investigates the role of the teacher in creating, implementing and sequencing dance curricula aligned with National Core Arts Standards using backward and forward design and embedded assessment. Course content includes choreographic tools, principles, structures and forms; critical pedagogy, constructivism and other learning theories; deeper understanding of elements of dance and human development. Prerequisite: DIDC-A or Summer Institute

Black & White

Thursday, August 31st, 2017 - Saturday, October 28th, 2017, Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays from 12p-5p

SLATE contemporary
473 25th Street

In Oakland

Featuring SLATE artists Anastasia Faiella, Barbara Kolo, and Patricia Thomas.

Emily Weil

Friday, September 1st, 2017 - Saturday, September 30th, 2017, 12:00pm - 5:00pm

SLATE contemporary
473 25th Street, Suite A

In Oakland

A special exhibition of paintings by Emily Weil at SLATE contemporary's Hall Gallery.

ARTIST’S STATEMENT

Bay Area artist Emily Weil creates colorful large-format mixed media abstract paintings, combining acrylics and watercolors with varied materials such as charcoal, ink, pencil, and pastels. Her titles suggest exploring space and time yet being in the present. Emily’s practice trusts the process of expressive painting and is usually surprised at her results of colors, splatters, drips, and scribbles.

In Weil’s own words: “When I prep a large canvas for a painting with acrylics—or when I tack a blank sheet of Arches watercolor paper up—I welcome the nervous excitement of expressing myself with paint, charcoal, pastels, India ink, or maybe a mix of red dirt from the Berkeley hills. I do not find a large, white, gessoed canvas frightening—for me it is an opening into a part of me that needs to come out and be seen. It’s a deeply personal journey. I trust the process of expressive painting and am usually surprised at the results. I also am often frustrated and full of doubt.

“I need to paint. I need it as much as I need to breathe. I am humbled and grateful I have found myself here—to wonder where all these colors, splatters, drips and scribbles come from.”

ABOUT

Weil was born in Marin County and grew up in Mill Valley, CA. After living in Oregon for 15 years, she returned to the Bay Area to obtain a BFA in graphic design from the California College of Arts and Crafts (CCAC) in 1989. Weil operates a freelance design business, Red Eye Design, from her floating home in Alameda, CA.

"Holding Up Half the Sky", a juried Art Exhibit

Friday, September 1st, 2017 - Tuesday, October 31st, 2017, Sept. 8th, 4:30 - 6:30 pm

Kaleidsocope Coffee
109 Park Place

In Richmond

Arts of Point Richmond is pleased to announce: “Holding Up Half the Sky”,
a new juried art exhibit in collaboration with Kaleidoscope Coffee.

September 1 – October 31, 2017

The theme celebrates all facets of womanhood, including women’s resilience and wisdom - characteristics especially critical in these volatile political and cultural times.

Anne Austin, curator of the San Pablo Art Gallery, juried this show, which features both light-hearted and thought-provoking artwork.

A reception is being held on Friday, September 8th and is open to the public. We hope you can come, meet the exhibiting artists and enjoy light refreshments and some of the café’s treats during your visit.

Kaleidoscope Coffee
109 Park Place, Point Richmond

Artists’ Reception
Friday, September 8, 4:30-6:30p

Developing and Implementing Dance Curricula-B

Tuesday, September 5th, 2017 - Tuesday, December 5th, 2017, 6-9 pm/ Tuesday Evenings

Luna Dance Institute
605 Addison Street

In Berkeley

Tuesday evenings, 6-9 pm, $525, Part 2

Part 2 of a 4-part foundations series, continuing from DIDC-A, this course investigates the role of the teacher in creating, implementing and sequencing dance curricula aligned with National Core Arts Standards using backward and forward design and embedded assessment. Course content includes choreographic tools, principles, structures and forms; critical pedagogy, constructivism and other learning theories; deeper understanding of elements of dance and human development. Prerequisite: DIDC-A or SI.

Developing & Implementing Dance Curricula-B (DIDC-B)

Tuesday, September 5th, 2017 - Tuesday, December 5th, 2017, 9 am-5 pm

Luna Dance Institute
605 Addison Street

In Berkeley

Investigate the role of the teacher in creating, implementing & sequencing standards-based dance curricula. Learn a process for moving students from exploration through improvisation to composition. Course content includes choreographic devices, principles of design, forms, and contemporary learning theories. Meets college/university professional standards. Prerequisite DIDC- A.

You can register here: http://portal.lunadanceinstitute.org/product/developing-implementing-dance-curricula-b/

In-Between Places: Korean American Artists in the Bay Area

Wednesday, September 13th, 2017 - Sunday, December 10th, 2017

Mills College Art Museum
5000 MacArthur Blvd, Oakland, CA 94613

In Oakland

IN-BETWEEN PLACES: KOREAN AMERICAN ARTISTS IN THE BAY AREA
MILLS COLLEGE ART MUSEUM
SEPTEMBER 13-DECEMBER 10, 2017
Opening Reception: Saturday, September 16, 6–8pm

Mills College Art Museum (MCAM) is pleased to present In-Between Places: Korean American Artists in the Bay Area featuring new work by Jung Ran Bae; Sohyung Choi; Kay Kang; Miran Lee; Youngjune Lew; Nicholas Oh; Younhee Paik; and Minji Sohn. The artists featured in In-Between Places reveal the reality and complexities of being a Korean American artist in the Bay Area—a location that has served as a gateway for Korean culture and a bridge between Korea and the West.

Since the beginning of the Korean diaspora, many Korean Americans have described their cultural identity as occupying an in-between space. Existing bi-culturally, on a median of “otherness” within a Korean and Western purview, Korean American artists often lack the affirmation of owning and belonging to a singular cultural vernacular.

This intersection of identities impacts how the work of Korean American artists is critically and popularly received. In Korea, Korean American art is often dismissed as American and or marginalized as specifically Korean in the United States. In-Between Places acknowledges the infinitely evolving and nuanced ways Korean Americans interpret and express history, culture, and art. Reflecting on the relationship of Korean American artists to artmaking in the Bay Area, the exhibition offers fresh considerations on the intricacies of cultural identity.

New works, commissioned specifically for this exhibition, embrace Korean and Western, traditional and contemporary approaches to art making. Painting, drawing, ceramics and bojagi (traditional Korean cloth wrapping) are represented alongside video, performance, and an art installation that incorporates beosun, (traditional socks worn by women). In-Between Places claims space for Korean Americans within the landscape of contemporary art and reflects

The Mystical Experience

Saturday, September 16th, 2017 - Saturday, October 7th, 2017, 6pm till late

Oakland Secret
577 5th St

In Oakland


The Mystical Experience: Free multimedia art show, opening with a night of themed music, performance, experiential art, face-painting, food, drink and more... at Oakland Secret (577 5th St Oakland), on Saturday September 16th, 6pm till late.

With performances by Oakland electro-pop band Parentz, ambient tunes with DJ Peter Go, and more acts to be announced.

A diverse group of artists have interpreted 'the mystical experience' through oil painting, embroidery, devotional drawings, blacklight painting, electronic light puppets, performance, and interactive installation.

Free, or sliding scale $5-$10 contribution encouraged to help venue and artists hold future events.

Features art by over a dozen Bay Area artists and more from further afield, including Ohio and Canada. Show curator Hayden Currie is an artist from New Zealand who lives in San Francisco.

The mystical experience is a state of mind associated with feelings of sacredness and closeness to the divine. It can range from extrovertive (a transformative encounter with nature for example), to introvertive (pure bliss consciousness). This show aims to give participants a range of perspectives on this mind state while being a lot of fun.

Check the facebook event page for more details.


World Without Mind: The Existential Threat of Big Tech with Franklin Foer and Nicholas de Monchaux

Monday, September 25th, 2017 - Monday, September 25th, 2017, 6:30PM

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

Over the past few decades there has been a revolution in terms of who controls knowledge and information. This rapid change has put us on a path to a world without private contemplation, autonomous thought, or solitary introspection—a world without mind. Elegantly tracing the intellectual history of computer science—from Descartes and the Enlightenment to Alan Turing to Stuart Brand and the hippie origins of today’s Silicon Valley—Franklin Foer exposes the dark underpinnings of our most idealistic dreams for technology. The corporate ambitions of Google, Facebook, Apple, and Amazon, he argues, are trampling longstanding liberal values, especially intellectual property and privacy. This is a nascent stage in the total automation and homogenization of social, political, and intellectual life. By reclaiming our private authority over how we intellectually engage with the world, we have the power to stem the tide. Foer, author of the forthcoming World Without Mind: The Existential Threat of Big Tech, is joined in conversation by Nicholas de Monchaux.

Franklin Foer is a national correspondent for The Atlantic. He is the former editor of the New Republic and the author of How Soccer Explains the World: An Unlikely Theory of Globalization, which has been translated into twenty-seven languages and a winner of a National Jewish Book Award.

Nicholas de Monchaux is director of the Berkeley Center for New Media and associate professor of architecture and urban design at UC Berkeley. He is the author of Spacesuit: Fashioning Apollo, winner of the Eugene Emme award from the American Astronautical Society and shortlisted for the Art Book Prize. His work has been exhibited at the 2010 Biennial of the Americas, the 2012 Venice Architecture Biennale, and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. He is a Fellow of the American Academy in Rome, and has received additional design awards and fellowships.

Participating units at UC Berkeley: Berkeley Center for New Media; Arts, Technology

Free Consultations & Professional Library Hours

Tuesday, September 26th, 2017 - Tuesday, September 26th, 2017, 3:30-6pm

Luna Dance Institute
605 Addison Street

In Berkeley

In one-to-one personalized sessions, LDI faculty focus on your individual concerns about dance education. No issue is too big or small. FREE half-hour sessions the last Tuesday of each month, 3:30-6pm, September 26th. Contact: jperena@lunadanceinstitute.org Professional Library opens Tuesday, 9/5, 4-6pm.

Andrew Lam - At Home

Tuesday, September 26th, 2017 - Tuesday, September 26th, 2017, 6:30pm-8:30pm

Oakland Asian Cultural Center
388 Ninth Street, Ste 290

In Oakland

A Conversation with Vietnamese American Award-Winning Author

Andrew Lam is the web editor of New America Media and a regular blogger for the Huffington Post. He was also a contributor to NPR’s 'All Things Considered'. His collection of essays, Perfume Dreams: Reflections on the Vietnamese Diaspora, which contends with the problem of identity as a Vietnamese living in the US, received the PEN Open Book Award in 2006. His second book, East Eats West: Writing in Two Hemispheres, a meditation on how Asian immigration changed the West, was named Top Ten Indies by Shelf Unbound magazine. Birds of Paradise Lost, a collection of short fiction about Vietnamese newcomers struggling to remake themselves in the San Francisco Bay, was a finalist for the California Book Award and won the Josephine Miles award for fiction in 2013. Lam’s interview of Ken Burns and Lynn Novick, creators of the new documentary series The Vietnam War appears in Salon.com. Lam’s father, Lam Quang Thi, a lieutenant general in the South Vietnamese army, was interviewed in the film.

Join us for a compelling night of readings with the author followed by a Q & A session, which promises to be an engaging exploration of the human costs of immigration and the personal weight of history and memory.

Doors open at 6:15pm


Tickets in Advance $10 (Students $5)
Available on eventbrite:
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/andrew-lam-at-home-in-the-diaspora-tickets-37827935373

Tickets ($12 at the door)

388 Ninth Street, Ste 290, Oakland, CA 94607 | www.oacc.cc | For more information: 510-637-0455





Curating the Performing Arts in the Age of Performance with Shannon Jackson and Rob Bailis

Wednesday, September 27th, 2017 - Wednesday, September 27th, 2017, 12pm

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

Partly as a response to the desire for participatory models, museums and other arts organizations have begun to incorporate performance into their curatorial programming. How is this contemporary interest in performance affecting historic performing arts organizations—theaters, dance companies, symphonies, and presenting organizations? How are categories such as dance, theater, and music maintained or altered as we welcome new experiments? How are performing artists thinking about the goals and techniques of their medium? UC Berkeley's Shannon Jackson and Rob Bailis discuss issues of curation in this evolving context.

Shannon Jackson is associate vice chancellor for the arts and design, Cyrus and Michelle Hadidi Chair in the humanities, and professor in the Departments of Rhetoric, and Theater, Dance, and Performance Studies at UC Berkeley. She has received numerous awards and fellowships, including a 2015 John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship and the Arts and Humanities Outstanding Service Award. In addition, she serves on the advisory boards of several journals and arts organizations and has been a plenary speaker at a variety of distinguished venues, including, most recently, the Venice Biennale.

Rob Bailis is associate director at Cal Performances. He is a professional clarinetist and has extensive experience in arts organization management, as previous director of ODC Theater. He has commissioned more than thirty new works in a variety of genres and has served as a panelist and program and policy consultant for foundations and arts funding organizations including MAP Fund, Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, SF Arts Commission, and the Center for Cultural Innovation, among many.

Curator’s Talk: Jordan Stein on Miyoko Ito

Wednesday, September 27th, 2017 - Wednesday, September 27th, 2017, 6 pm

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

Join guest curator Jordan Stein for an informal talk focusing on Miyoko Ito’s singular and compelling form of abstraction.

Portraits and Protests

Wednesday, September 27th, 2017 - Wednesday, September 27th, 2017, 7PM

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

Abigail Child worked as a shipper at Canyon Cinema in 1977 and 1978. For her, “It was a time to look closely at films on the rewinds, or stay late and get a preview of incoming films. After that, I became coeditor with Henry Hills of Cinemanews magazine, and ultimately an editor of [at least] one edition.” This program features works made by Canyon members between 1970 and 1981—a diary film, a self-portrait, and a portrait—along with Child’s most recent film, a dazzling collage portrait of Emma Goldman that links her twentieth-century activism to modern-day protests.




Curator's Talk: Russell Lord on Gordon Parks

Thursday, September 28th, 2017 - Thursday, September 28th, 2017, 12pm

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

Russell Lord, curator at the New Orleans Museum of Art and organizer of Gordon Parks: The Making of an Argument, offers critical insights into Parks’s first photo-essay for Life magazine.


Reading & Booksigning: Malik Gaines

Thursday, September 28th, 2017 - Thursday, September 28th, 2017, 5:30pm

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

Join New York–based writer and artist Malik Gaines for a reading from his new book, Black Performance on the Outskirts of the Left, which traces a circulation of political ideas through performances of the 1960s and beyond, following a route from the US to West Africa, Europe, and back. Chapters explore American singer and pianist Nina Simone, Ghanaian playwrights Efua Sutherland and Ama Ata Aidoo, Afro-German actor Gunther Kaufmann’s film work with Rainer Werner Fassbinder, and San Francisco’s Cockettes troupe and their collaborator Sylvester. Gaines, an assistant professor of performance studies in the Tisch School of the Arts at New York University, has performed and exhibited extensively with the group My Barbarians.

A booksigning follows the reading.

In This Our Life

Thursday, September 28th, 2017 - Thursday, September 28th, 2017, 7PM

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

In In This Our Life, Bette Davis delivers what James Baldwin refers to as a “ruthlessly accurate” portrayal of a spoiled, amoral Southern girl. Thoroughly convinced of the protection that her wealth, color, and sex afford her, she callously blames her black chauffeur for a fatal hit-and-run accident for which she herself was responsible, going so far as to try to solicit the young man to plead guilty. Baldwin regards the scene as an example of “the white descent from dignity” with which blacks in the US are often confronted: it “would seem to indicate that white people have no principles whatever.”

Dark Matter

Thursday, September 28th, 2017 - Saturday, October 21st, 2017, Thurs. & Fri. 12 - 6, Sat. 11 - 5, first fridays till 9

GearBox Gallery
770 West Grand

In Oakland

GearBox Members Jerry Mclaughlin (coldwax painting) & Gina Telcocci (sculpture) will be showing new pieces. The works of both of these artists reflect a deep engagement with the raw materials they are comprised of and the power of pure abstraction.

McLaughlin's new work is inspired by the poetry and lives of Edna St. Vincent Millay and Constantine Cavafy. His painting is informed by the urban world of concrete, asphalt, & steel, as well as by the decay, erosion, & weathering of that environment. It is both austere in it's minimalism, and intimate in it's detailed textures, which invite close examination. The powerful, rough presence of these paintings is the result of intensive working and building up of many layers of paint, pigment, and cold wax medium, along with additives such as earth, sand, & ash. The work speaks of the artist's appreciation of all that is tough, enduring, gritty and human in the city environment.

Gina Telcocci's sculptures are made of meticulously assembled combinations of materials, ranging from harvested willows, reeds, & found wood, to metal & plastic bits of detritus. Structures are created using traditional weaving techniques & assemblage, then layers are built up to enhance the forms. The resulting objects and installations combine qualities inherent in the materials themselves with the familiarity of traditional crafts, and formal abstraction. The simple shapes with their ambiguous references to creatures or things become symbolic and contemplative objects with shifting meanings, suggesting both the known and the unknown.

Factotum

Thursday, September 28th, 2017 - Saturday, October 21st, 2017, Thurs. & Fri. 12 - 6, Sat. 11 - 5, first fridays till 9

GearBox Gallery
770 West Grand

In Oakland

"Factotum" is an installation in GearBox Gallery's Inner Room by Jessica Eastburn.

Eastburn was selected by GearBox as a guest installation artist. Her paintings and cut-outs juxtapose different types of elements (cartoon, abstract, pattern, representational) into an expansive wall piece. They take the idea of information overload as a starting point. These works address technology and the deluge of information that we are presented with on a daily basis through email, website, and social media.

Il Boom

Friday, September 29th, 2017, 4pm

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

Billed as “The Unseen Film by Vittorio De Sica,” Il Boom finally receives its long overdue US theatrical release. Written by the director’s longtime collaborator Cesare Zavattini, Il Boom is a hilarious sendup that critiques Italy’s economic miracle of the early 1960s. While the Roman elite enjoy the material rewards of success, De Sica’s biting satire follows the challenges faced by loser-protagonist Giovanni, a clowning, often desperate businessman who can’t support his family’s extravagant lifestyle. Starring the great Italian actor Alberto Sordi (The White Sheik, I vitelloni, Mafioso), whose marvelous performance nails the existential dilemma he faces, Il Boom is a shining example of commedia all’italiana (comedy Italian style).


The Chase

Friday, September 29th, 2017 - Friday, September 29th, 2017, 7PM

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

In the small Texas oil town of Tarl, disquiet bubbles up like black gold from a dark underground reserve, while out in the rough countryside, Bubber Reeves (Robert Redford), an escaped convict, is making his way through the brush toward home. The rumors of his return set in motion all manner of vicious gossip in a town already heaped in hanky-panky. After all, it’s a hot summer night and the oil-rich residents are pumping their appetites. Only Sheriff Calder (Marlon Brando at his bruised best) is immune to the drunken revelry that has overtaken his domain.


Dance in TK

Saturday, September 30th, 2017 - Saturday, September 30th, 2017, 1-5pm

Luna Dance Institute
605 Addison Street

In Berkeley

September 30, 1-5pm, $125 No prerequisite
Learn how dance reinforces transitional kindergarten curricular objectives in developmentally-appropriate ways, by exploring relationships and play.

You can register here: http://portal.lunadanceinstitute.org/product/dance-in-tk/

Panel Discussion: The Art and Activism of Gordon Parks

Saturday, September 30th, 2017 - Saturday, September 30th, 2017, 1pm

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

Occasioned by the exhibition Gordon Parks: The Making of an Argument, this panel offers an appreciation of the influential photographer and a critical examination of the processes that shaped his first Life magazine photo-essay, “Harlem Gang Leader.” Moderated by Leigh Raiford, UC Berkeley associate professor of African American studies, the program features Makeda Best, curator of photography at the Harvard Art Museums; Tina Sacks, assistant professor at UC Berkeley’s School of Social Welfare; and noted documentary photographer Ken Light, Reva and David Logan Professor of Photojournalism at the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism.

Please note: We regret that Orlando Bagwell will be unable to participate as originally announced.

The General

Saturday, September 30th, 2017 - Saturday, September 30th, 2017, 4pm

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

In this masterpiece of silent comedy based on a true incident of the Civil War, Buster Keaton is a railway engineer who is rejected by the Confederate army and thought a coward by his girlfriend. When a small band of Union soldiers penetrates far behind Confederate lines to steal a locomotive, he sets off in hot pursuit, resulting in one of the most harrowing and hilarious chases ever filmed. Buster's relationship to the train is at least as touching as his love for Marian Mack, and both get rather rough treatment in this wartime setting—but a little kiss from Buster makes it better.


Serenade for Haiti

Saturday, September 30th, 2017, 615pm

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

“Music is our refuge,” says a student at the Sainte Trinité Music School in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. “With music . . . we feel we are in another world, far from troubles.” Owsley Brown’s vibrant documentary recognizes the troubles but celebrates the refuge, testifying to the role that music can play in creating community and sustaining hope under the most difficult of circumstances. Shot in Port-au-Prince over a period of years both before and after the 2010 earthquake that killed hundreds of thousands and reduced much of the city to rubble, Serenade for Haiti finds a locus of continuity at Sainte Trinité, which has been training young people in classical European and Haitian musical traditions since the 1950s. Replete with vivid images and sounds, the film focuses on interviews with students—most of them poor, some orphaned by political violence—and their teachers, many former students themselves. All speak eloquently about how the discipline of music has helped them discover their own voices and value in the world. After the quake, with the school’s stately white buildings in ruins, lessons and practice continue outdoors, maintaining a rhythm of resilience. In one teacher’s words, “The country is destroyed. All the buildings are destroyed. Music must go on. Life goes on.”


Spring in a Small Town

Saturday, September 30th, 2017 - Saturday, September 30th, 2017, 8pm

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

Named a formative influence by filmmakers like Wong Kar-wai and Zhang Yimou, voted the best Chinese film of all time in a poll of Chinese critics, and with a visual panache often compared to Ophuls, Antonioni, and Welles, Fei Mu’s 1948 gem possesses a melancholy beauty all its own. In the ruins of a bombed-out country estate, a sorrowful husband lives in the past, while his beautiful wife pines for something, anything, to change. “I don’t have the courage to die,” she whispers in the film’s mesmeric, noirish voice-over, “and he doesn’t have the courage to live.” As in many a noir, the arrival of an outsider—one known to both husband and wife—may change everything. Made a year before Mao’s People’s Republic of China was proclaimed, the film’s beauty exists both in time—many elements seem drawn from Hollywood noir and the glory years of Shanghai cinema, while its languorous tracking shots rival the best of Ophuls—and utterly out of time, with a romantic splendor and a remarkable sense of melancholy capable of surprising even the most jaded contemporary filmgoer. The fact that the film was quickly hidden away after its debut, condemned as counterrevolutionary and embodying “petit-bourgeois decadence,” merely adds to the film’s mystique; it was finally rediscovered in the 1980s.

The Art of Taking Risks: An Artist Talk and Book Event

Saturday, October 7th, 2017 - Saturday, October 7th, 2017, 1pm to 3pm

GearBox Gallery
770 West Grand Ave

In Oakland

GearBox Gallery presents: "The Art of Taking Risks" an artist talk and book event about the importance of taking risks in art and life.

Creativity is about taking risks and being unconventional. Come hear GearBox member artist Jerry McLaughlin, co-author of the groundbreaking book Cold Wax Medium: Techniques, Concepts & Conversations, talk about the risks he took on his unconventional path from physician to artist and author. You will be able to view Jerry’s current group of paintings on exhibit at the gallery and are invited to look through this exciting new book.

The event is FREE and refreshments will be served.

Serenade for Haiti

Sunday, October 8th, 2017, 2pm

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

“Music is our refuge,” says a student at the Sainte Trinité Music School in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. “With music . . . we feel we are in another world, far from troubles.” Owsley Brown’s vibrant documentary recognizes the troubles but celebrates the refuge, testifying to the role that music can play in creating community and sustaining hope under the most difficult of circumstances. Shot in Port-au-Prince over a period of years both before and after the 2010 earthquake that killed hundreds of thousands and reduced much of the city to rubble, Serenade for Haiti finds a locus of continuity at Sainte Trinité, which has been training young people in classical European and Haitian musical traditions since the 1950s. Replete with vivid images and sounds, the film focuses on interviews with students—most of them poor, some orphaned by political violence—and their teachers, many former students themselves. All speak eloquently about how the discipline of music has helped them discover their own voices and value in the world. After the quake, with the school’s stately white buildings in ruins, lessons and practice continue outdoors, maintaining a rhythm of resilience. In one teacher’s words, “The country is destroyed. All the buildings are destroyed. Music must go on. Life goes on.”


Il Boom

Tuesday, October 10th, 2017, 7PM

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
2155 Center Street

In Berkeley

Billed as “The Unseen Film by Vittorio De Sica,” Il Boom finally receives its long overdue US theatrical release. Written by the director’s longtime collaborator Cesare Zavattini, Il Boom is a hilarious sendup that critiques Italy’s economic miracle of the early 1960s. While the Roman elite enjoy the material rewards of success, De Sica’s biting satire follows the challenges faced by loser-protagonist Giovanni, a clowning, often desperate businessman who can’t support his family’s extravagant lifestyle. Starring the great Italian actor Alberto Sordi (The White Sheik, I vitelloni, Mafioso), whose marvelous performance nails the existential dilemma he faces, Il Boom is a shining example of commedia all’italiana (comedy Italian style).



The Art of Taking Risks

Saturday, October 14th, 2017 - Saturday, October 14th, 2017, 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

GearBox Gallery
770 West Grand

In Oakland

Includes Artist Reception & Refreshments. Creativity is about taking risks and being unconventional. Come hear GearBox member artist Jerry McLaughlin, co-author of the groundbreaking book Cold Wax Medium: Techniques, Concepts & Conversations, talk
about the risks he took on his unconventional path from physician to artist and author. You will be able to view Jerry’s current show of paintings on exhibit at the gallery and are invited to look through this exciting new book.

Panel Discussion: Picturing the Environment

Saturday, October 14th, 2017 - Saturday, October 14th, 2017, 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm

Richmond Art Center
2540 Barrett Ave Richmond, CA 94804

In Richmond

Join us for a panel of exhibiting artists whose work is in relationship to the environment.

THE CORPORATION: NEW ARTWORK BY DAN NELSON - Closing Reception and Artist Talk

Sunday, October 15th, 2017 - Sunday, October 15th, 2017, 03:00 pm - 06:00 pm

The Compound Gallery
1167 65th st. Oakland, CA 94608

In Oakland

An Interdisciplinary exhibition of corporate culture and perception. Check out #thecorporationart on Instagram to follow Dan’s progress and inspiration.

The conceptual artist and author of the McSweeney’s book “All Known Metal Bands” explores the culture and aesthetics of the world of corporations and day jobs in a wide-ranging interdisciplinary show.

Based on Nelson’s experience working at a successful start-up in Emeryville from 2009-2015, the show explores the culture and aesthetics of the corporate world in a wide-ranging show with over 120 works of video, photography, sound art, text-based works, posters, sculptures, interactive pieces, and paintings.

A limited-edition 64-page book of the same name will be launched at the show’s opening, which includes photographs taken in offices and warehouses, corporate haiku written during long meetings, spam email promotions, digital collages, office humor, and more.

The book and the gallery show highlight a number of current themes in American life: corporatism, neo-liberalism, greed, boredom, chaos, futility, plastic, cardboard, dysfunctional hierarchies, and the color beige.

About:

Dan Nelson is an interdisciplinary artist, musician, and author who plays with words, symbols, signals, and sounds to explore how humans communicate and create meaning. His large-scale, multifaceted work includes video, photography, sound art, text-based works, sculptures, and painting. His most well-known work is “All Known Metal Bands,” a 300-page list of 51,000 heavy metal band names published by McSweeney’s. He has been involved in the Oakland art scene since 2002, and lives and works in Oakland, California.

The Compound Gallery
1167 65th st. Oakland, CA 94608
www.thecompoundgallery.com
info@thecompoundgallery.com
Hours: Wed-Sun 12-7pm
(Toll Free) 844-278-7447
https://www.facebook.com/compoundgallery/


Dwelling In-Between: Korean Americans in the Bay Area

Saturday, October 21st, 2017 - Saturday, October 21st, 2017, 2-5pm

David Brower Center in Berkeley
2150 Allston Way, Suite 100

In Berkeley

Saturday, October 21, 2017
Dwelling In-Between: Korean Americans in the Bay Area
2:00-5:00PM, David Brower Center in Berkeley

Korean American visual artists, writers, and scholars share their praxis and reflections on the Korean diaspora about the transnational connections of Korean American cultural production. Featuring presentations by In-Between Places curator Linda Inson Choy, Jung Ran Bae (artist), Laura Kang (UC Irvine), Myung Mi Kim (poet), Rosemarie Nahm (Angel Island Immigration Station Foundation); and Minji Sohn (artist).

PARATORE PIANO DUO

Saturday, October 21st, 2017 - Saturday, October 21st, 2017, 7:30pm

Valley Center for Performing Arts/Holy Names University
3500 MOUNTAIN BLVD

In Oakland

Anthony and Joseph Paratore: "The best 2-man orchestra in the world"--.Mullheim, Germany.

Program: Frederick Chopin-Sonata in b-flat minor, Op. 35;
Rimsky-Korsakoff- Sheherazade Op. 45;;
Maurice Ravel -Rapsodie Espagnole;
George Gershwin- Rhapsody in Blue.

First Person Plural | Movie Screening and Director's Talk

Wednesday, October 25th, 2017 - Wednesday, October 25th, 2017, 6:30-8:30 pm

Mills College Danforth Lecture Hall
5000 MacArthur Blvd 94613

In Oakland

Wednesday, October 25, 2017
First Person Plural | Movie Screening and Director's Talk
6:30–8:30 PM, Mills College Danforth Lecture Hall

In 1966, Deann Borshay Liem was adopted by an American family and was sent from Korea to her new home. Growing up in California, the memory of her birth family was nearly obliterated until recurring dreams lead Deann to discover the truth: her Korean mother was very much alive. Bravely uniting her biological and adoptive families, Deann's heartfelt journey makes First Person Plural a poignant essay on family, loss, and the reconciling of two identities.

2017 Pleasanton Harvest Festival

Friday, October 27th, 2017 - Sunday, October 29th, 2017, 10am-5pm

Alameda County Fairgrounds
4501 Pleasanton Avenue

In

The Pleasanton Harvest Festival, known as the largest indoor arts and crafts show on the West Coast, has announced new dates for their 2017 show, happening October 27-29 at the Alameda County Fairgrounds.

But don’t be spooked! These new Halloween weekend dates will still showcase the festival’s same top quality artisans, craftspeople, food purveyors, musicians and more.

The Harvest Festival Original Art and Craft Show offers a unique shopping experience which mixes live entertainment, music, and delicious festival foods with some of the best handmade gifts around. Attendees can shop for thousands of American handmade, embellished arts and crafts, including original art, jewelry, clothing, ceramics, photography, specialty foods and much more. Guests can stroll hundreds of indoor and outdoor booths, meet artists face-to-face, and get their purchases personalized.

Kids will enjoy the hands-on KidZone area, while guests of all ages can take in exciting live entertainment from comedic jugglers Scotty and Trink and the local musical group Retroactive Dance Band.

The Pleasanton Harvest Festival will also help to fight hunger in the community by hosting a food drive at the show. Anyone who brings a canned food donation or a non-perishable food donation for the Alameda County Community Food Bank will save $2 off an adult or senior admission.

For tickets and additional information, visit http://www.harvestfestival.com

MODERNA

Thursday, November 2nd, 2017 - Saturday, January 6th, 2018, 12:00pm - 5:00pm

SLATE contemporary
473 25th Street, Suite A

In Oakland

An exhibition featuring three SLATE artists Maya Kabat, Lola, and Maura Segal.

ANN HOBSON PILOT, Harp/TAI MURRAY, Violin

Saturday, November 11th, 2017 - Saturday, November 11th, 2017, 7:30 pm

Valley Center for the Performing Arts/Holy Names University
3500 Mountain Blvd

In Oakland

Ann Hobson Pilot served as principal harpist for the Boston Symphony for almost 40 years. She continues her career as a renowned soloist and chamber musician, performing regularly throughout the country.
Program:
Vieuxtemps: Reverie-Adagio for Violin and Harp
Carlos Salzedo: Scintillation for solo harp
Bernard Andres: Zerbina-Divertissement for violin and harp
Nathan Milstein-Paganiniana
Andy Scott: Paquito (violin and harp)
Ravel/Michael Maganuco: Pavane pour une infant defunte (violin and harp)
Zequinha de Abreu/Maganuco: Tico-Tico No Fuba (violin and harp)
Ralph Vaughan Williams: Six Studies in English Folksong (violin and harp)
Piazzolla/Maganuco: Valsisimo, Oblivion and Escualo (violin and harp)

Voices of Music: Virtuoso Concerto Holiday Celebration

Sunday, December 3rd, 2017, 7:30pm

St. Mary Magdalen
2005 Berryman

In Berkeley

Celebrate the holidays with us. We are bringing you another exuberant evening featuring Bach’s Brandenburg Concerto No 6, as well as virtuoso concertos by Geminiani, Sarro and Vivaldi. Ever hear a concerto by Domenico Natale Sarro? Join us for an evening with your favorite well-known concerti and also be delighted by music that is new to you.

Elizabeth Blumenstock, Maria Caswell, Lisa Grodin, Katherine Heater, Kati Kyme, Carla Moore, Farley Pearce, Hanneke van Proosdij, Elisabeth Reed, William Skeen, David Tayler and Tanya Tomkins.

5th Annual Juried Art Show at the Piedmont Center for the Arts

Saturday, January 13th, 2018 - Sunday, February 11th, 2018, 12 noon - 3:00 pm

Piedmont Center for the Arts
801 Magnolia Avenue, Piedmont

In Oakland

The 5th Annual Juried Art Show presented by The Piedmont Center for the Arts is a juried art exhibition selected from submissions highlighting a large variety of contemporary 2-dimenional works by Bay Area artists. Featuring original art created within the past two years, 35 pieces will be selected by guest jurors Carin Adams, Oakland Museum of California, Associate Curator, Art and Material Culture and Jenny Gheith, Assistant Curator of Painting and Sculpture, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

TELEGRAPH STRING QUARTET

Saturday, January 20th, 2018 - Saturday, January 20th, 2018, 7:30 pm

Valley Ctr. Performing Arts/Holy Names University
3500 Mountain Blvd

In Oakland

Eric Chen and Joseph Maile, Violins; Pei-ling Lin,Viola; Jeremiah Shaw, Cello.

Program:
Wolf: Italian Serenade; Beethoven: Quartet in A Major, Op. 18, No.5; Arnold Schoenberg: String Quartet No. 1.

Voices of Music: An Evening in Paris: Music for the King’s Chamber and the Parisian Salons

Sunday, January 21st, 2018, 7:30pm

St. Mary Magdalen
2005 Berryman

In Berkeley

Music by Couperin, Marais and Telemann. Carla Moore, Hanneke van Proosdij, Elisabeth Reed, William Skeen, Derek Tam and David Tayler

STEWART GOODYEAR, Pianist

Saturday, February 24th, 2018 - Saturday, February 24th, 2018, 7:30pm

Valley Ctr. Performing Arts/Holy Names University
3500 Mountain Blvd

In Oakland

Mr. Goodyear has been proclaimed, "a phenomenon" by the Los Angeles Times and "one of the best pianists of his generation" by The Philadelphia Inquirer.

Program:

Beethoven: Sonata No. 30 in E Major, Op. 109; Ravel: Pavane pour une infant defunte; Ravel: Alborada del gracioso; Mussorgsky: Pictures at an Exhibition.

Voices of Music: Leonardo da Vinci: A Musical Odyssey

Sunday, March 4th, 2018, 7:30pm

St. Mary Magdalen
2005 Berryman

In Berkeley

Voices of Music presents “Leonardo da Vinci: A Musical Odyssey," which explores the music that Leonardo da Vinci would have heard in the cities in which he lived. There is no surviving music that Leonardo da Vinci played or composed, but through the writing of Giorgio Vasari and contemporaneous accounts we know that Leonardo was an acclaimed virtuoso on the lira da braccio, a type of bowed string instrument, and that he loved to accompany himself as he sang improvised poetry. Proficiency in music was highly valued in his time alongside the study of art and architecture. Da Vinci’s life coincides with a burst of activity in music, including the invention of music printing by Ottaviano Petrucci in Venice as well as the patronage in the 1480s of Lorenzo de’ Medici in Florence. Our research for this project includes a variety of musical forms, including frottole, sung poetry, music from the Medici and Sforza courts, the circle of Isabella d’Este, and the Parisian chansons from da Vinci’s final years in France. Join us for our story which will take you on a journey through Leonardo’s musical world, illustrating the synergy between science and art along the way.

Featuring Lawrence Rosenwald, poet and story teller; Stefanie True, soprano; Deborah Rentz-Moore mezzo soprano; Shira Kammen, lira da braccio and many others.

RASTRELLI CELLO QUARTET

Saturday, April 7th, 2018 - Saturday, April 7th, 2018, 7:30 pm

Valley Ctr. Performing Arts/Holy Names University
3500 Mountain Blvd

In Oakland

Kira Kraftzoff; Micha Degtjareff; Kirill Timofeev; Sergio Drapkin

"Riveting..entertaining...These four musicians could sound like a classical symphony one moment and play ragtime, jazz or klezmer the next..." -Ontario, Canada

Program: David Popper: Tarantella; Bela Bartok: Six Hungarian Dances; Edvard Grieg: Two excerpts from "peer Gynt"; Brahms: Six Hungarian Dances; Paul Desmond: Take Five; Tchaikovsky: Andante Cantabile from String Quartet No. 1; Tchaikovsky: Melody, Op. 42, No. 3; Karl Davidoff: By Fontain; Beatles Song Book.




© 2017 510 Arts