Events


Annual Purchase Award

Monday, November 1st, 2010 - Sunday, November 1st, 2015, 9-5 Monday-Friday

Emeryville City Hall
1333 Park Blvd.

In Emeryville

The lobby of City Hall in Emeryville serves as an emerging gallery of local artworks.  Since 2005, the City has acquired one work which was selected from the Annual Emeryville Celebration of the Arts Exhibit held each October.  The juried exhibit showcases the work of the many professional artists who live and work here.  With a long tradition of artists cooperative housing, Emeryville is home to large number of artists, in fact, Emeryville may boast one of the most dense artists populations per capita in the Bay Region.  Past Purchase Award acquisitions include paintings by Canan Tolon and Michael Murphy, textile by Ana Lisa Hedstrom, light sculpture by Therese Lahaie and a ceramic wall hanging by Cuong Ta.  All the works as well as installations in and around City Hall such as Roger Berry's Solar Rose can be viewed suring normal business hours when City Hall is open to the public.  Please visit soon!


Bees: Tiny Insect, Big Impact

Saturday, January 31st, 2015 - Sunday, September 20th, 2015, January 31-September 20, 2015; Wed-Thur 11-5, Fri 11-9, Sat-Sun 10-6

Oakland Museum of California
1000 Oak Street

In Oakland

A new exhibition at the Oakland Museum of California examines the wildly diverse and intricate world of one of the most important creatures to human agriculture and the natural environment. Through family-friendly experiences, hands-on activities, and media, Bees: Tiny Insect, Big Impact is the first major museum exhibition to focus on the incredible diversity of bees in California and the urgent issue of bee population declines statewide. Bees tells the story of these amazing insects, while providing visitors the opportunity to learn about the value of bees to our economy and ecosystems, and discover how simple but powerful actions can help bees to survive in a changing world. Covering topics such Bay Area beekeeping, the diversity of California native bee species, and the similarities between bees and humans, the exhibition features cutting-edge science on bee behavior and conservation, opportunities for visitors to get involved in research, and ways to make their own yards and neighborhoods more attractive to bees.

A family friendly exhibition, Bees encourages visitors of all ages to discover real bee specimens under a microscope, play games such as "Is it a bee?" to learn how species are identified, and create original animations about their vision for a future with bees. Visitors can climb inside life sized honeybee cells, learning along the way about factors that contribute to bee disappearances. The gallery features real beekeeping tools, including a cross-section of a beehive, a honey spinner and implements for honey collection, and a chance to try on real beekeeper suits in adult and child sizes. The exhibition also offers opportunities to get involved outside of the Gallery, with citizen science projects, bee hotels installed in the OMCA Gardens, and guides on building bee hotels for visitors to take home.

Presented by Oakland Museum of California.

$10-15; $6 9-17, 8 & under free, OMCA Mbrs free

Kozmik Kirtan with Evelie Posch & Kismat-Mahal Ens (KSME)

Sunday, February 15th, 2015 - Sunday, February 21st, 2016, 7:00 PM

Yoga Tree Telegraph
2807 Telegraph Avenue

In Berkeley

Kismat-Mahal Ensemble {KSME} led by Evelie Delfino Såles Posch blends intercultural/interfaith meditation, singing and a circle dance, to connect with the divine and all beings; for healing, remembering wholeness; for peace of heart-mind; to grow compassion and loving-kindness.

With many players including Cait McWhir on harmonium, voice; Lisa Wellhausen on flute; Revi Airborne on violin, voice; Suellen Primost on cello, voice.

When: 3rd Sundays ~ Feb 15 (3/15, 4/ 19, 5/17, 6/21, 7/19, 8/16, 9/20, 10/18, 11/15, 12/20, 1/17/2016, 2/21/2016 etc.). And there is kirtan EVERY Sunday with other leaders/groups.

Where: 2807 Telegraph Ave Berkeley (at Stuart St)

Sliding scale $15 to $30 suggested love donation.

Q's/info: Evelie 650-275-3884 {ASK-EVVI}


Kurt Fishback: 51 Portraits of Women Artists

Friday, June 5th, 2015 - Saturday, July 18th, 2015, Thursdays/Fridays 12-6pm, Saturdays 11am-5pm

Transmission Gallery
770 West Grand Ave.

In Oakland

Transmission Gallery is pleased to present “51 Portraits of Women Artists”, a new photography series by Kurt Fishback. Please join us for the opening reception Friday, June 5th 6-9pm.

In 1979, Kurt embarked on a body of work that he has continued through today… portraits of artists. It spawned from the desire to share artists with the public and it escalated into a prolific and resounding series. Kurt has had the pleasure of being reared and influenced in the company of many of the greatest American artists of our time (Ansel Adams, Edward Weston, Wynne Bullock among others). And his portraits have offered a glimpse of their realness that also brings to us and encapsulates in one photograph an understanding of their work. “I see all sides of the story and choose not to take sides and see all visual expression as valuable if made with eyes wide open.” – Kurt Fishback.

Kurt’s new series within this larger body of work was inspired by the glaring disparity between the representation and validity of men and women artists. The vast majority of famous and well-respected artists were men when there’s an equal amount of tremendous work pouring from the hands of women. He realized he was part of the way things were. And now, through this body of work, wants to create a sense of balance.

The show at Transmission Gallery will consist of vintage portraits of important female artists from early-on in his project (e.g. Eleanor Antin, Ruth Bernhard, Joan Brown, Edna Bullock, Judy Dater, Viola Frey) juxtaposed with his growing series of portraits of contemporary female artists in the bay area.

Always working in black and white as it is “the best way to see light”, Kurt encounters every portrait through the process of collaboration. It’s this partnership and respect that trav

Developing & Implementing Dance Curricula-A Course

Saturday, June 6th, 2015 - Friday, July 10th, 2015, 9am-5pm

Luna Dance Institute
605 Addison St.

In Berkeley

Luna's entry point for all teachers of dance. The first course in a three part foundation series includes the elements of dance (both D'Houbler and Laban); structuring discrete dance lessons (National Core Arts Standards); integrating dance across subject matter; human development theory; observation and instructional methods. $525, no-prerequisite. Register at http://lunadanceinstitute.org/pl-register/.

Many Streams: New work by Martin Webb

Saturday, June 6th, 2015 - Sunday, July 12th, 2015, Wednesday - Sunday 12 - 7pm

The Compound Gallery
1167 65th Ave

In Oakland

Martin Webb captures images on night walks in his neighborhood and on road trips, looking for the common and the contrasting vernacular of both wild and urban landscapes.

Whether on foot or on the road, Webb seeks out new ways of seeing his everyday/familiar environments and absorbing new or novel places. In his studio, Webb works with this garnered source material in an open-ended, intuitive way to produce paintings, prints, and objects that are simple in form yet speak to complex relationships of materials and decay, culture and nature.

“Since I am often a figurative painter, this group of work might be defined by its conspicuous absence of people. Last year, I’d started taking photographs late at night in my neighborhood and became intrigued by the way that familiar scenes are transformed by darkness and stark artificial light. I noticed how the urban landscape makes sense when human activity is present, but takes on other qualities when the people are absent. This led to some initial paintings experimenting with these images, but they lacked a solid direction. Then quite recently I took a trip through the Eastern Sierras and went out of my way to seek out the old abandoned gold-mining towns and settlers’ cabins. Again, the absence of people struck me. The cabins remain as a record of people having been there and passed onward. The natural landscape has shown the people their folly, thrown them out, and is now reclaiming the flimsy buildings back into its self. I’m always fascinated by people’s relationship with the land and time, and in particular the way that things we regard as solid and permanent are actually temporary, in flux, and part of a continuum much larger than ourselves.”

Opening will take place from 6 to 9pm

Luna Dance Institute Summer Camps

Monday, June 22nd, 2015 - Friday, August 7th, 2015

Luna Dance Institute
605 Addison St.

In Berkeley

Luna Dance Institute is the only choreography-based dance program in the Bay Area, offering a variety of fun dance camp options for dancers of all ages. This summer, we offer half-day mini camps for 5-7 y/o, full day camps for 8-11 y/o, and teen choreography workshop intensives. Students discover, invent, perform & respond through the ART of dance. Camps offered June-August. Tuition assistance is available. Contact jperena@lunadanceinstitute.org, 510-883-1118. http://lunadanceinstitute.org/summer-dance-camps/

California Shakespeare Theater: Summer Conservatory- 4-wk Oakland

Monday, June 29th, 2015 - Friday, July 3rd, 2015, June 29-July 24, 9am-3pm

Oakland School for the Arts
530 18th St.

In Oakland

Cal Shakes' Summer Shakespeare Conservatory for ages 8-18 offers a theater experience rooted in the same passion for artistic exploration and excellence that guide our award-winning Main Stage productions. We foster self-expression and artistic discipline to engage students in the theater-making process: Participants spend the morning playing and creating in a wide variety of theater disciplines, taught by working theater professionals; afternoons are spent in rehearsals. The experience culminates in Shakespeare performances for family and friends at the end of the two- and four-week sessions.

Presented by California Shakespeare Theater.

$1350.

Max Blumenthal: The 51-Day War: Ruin & Resistance in Gaza

Wednesday, July 1st, 2015 - Wednesday, July 1st, 2015, 7/1/15, 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM

First Congregational Church of Berkeley
2345 Channing Way

In Berkeley

One year ago Israel launched air strikes on Gaza, followed by a ground invasion. The ensuing 51 days of this assault left more than 2200 people dead, the vast majority of whom were Palestinian civilians, including more than 500 children. 10,000 homes were destroyed. The United Nations has stated that 300,000 Palestinians were displaced. Max Blumenthal was in Gaza throughout this catastrophe. In this explosive masterpiece of intimate reportage, he reveals the harrowing conditions and cynical deceptions that led to this ruinous 'war' and tells many of the human stories otherwise buried.

He brings Gaza to life and details the ferocious clashes when the Israeli military occupied this desperately poor strip of land. He discloses the truth behind numerous Israeli claims and such contentious issues as the use of civilians as human shields by Israeli forces, the official targetting of Palestinian civilians and other war crimes of the Israeli armed forces. He carefully examines the military doctrine responsible. He provides exceptionally moving testimonies from residents. The ravaged population of Gaza was left out in the cold, with no relief from the international community and inadequate coverage by mainstream media. Here at last is the truth of this globally condemned war.

"Max Blumenthal has spent the last decade transforming himself into one of the most vital voices in journalism today, always speaking truth to power with fearlessness and integrity." - Reza Aslan, author of Zealot

Max Blumenthal is the author of Republican Gomorrah and Goliath. A senior writer for Alternet, his writings have also appeared in The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, The Nation, The Guardian, Salon.com, and many others.

Hosted by Philip Maldari, the veteran host of KPFA's Sunday Morning Show.

$12 advance tickets: 800-838-3006 or Pegasus (3 sites), Moe's, Walden Pond Bookstore, Diesel a Bookstore, Mrs. Dalloway's Books, SF: Modern Times, $15 door, KPFA benefit

Presented by KPFA Radio 94.1 FM.

$12 advance, $15 door.

Seed (John M. Stahl, US, 1931)

Wednesday, July 1st, 2015, 7:30pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Archival Print!

The Charles G. Norris book Seed was subtitled A Novel of Birth Control, but this adaptation makes a case for the virtues of motherhood. John Boles plays a would-be writer, Bart, whose ambition has been dampened by domestic life. A former flame (Genevieve Tobin) holds out the promise of escape from the squalling brood, and soon Bart’s wife (Lois Wilson) is left to tend their offspring on her own. An admiring LA Times reporter wrote, “Dominating the picture is the feminine reaction to life. And this is Mr. Stahl’s forte.” Bette Davis puts in a brief appearance as Bart’s daughter.

• Written by Gladys Lehman, from a story by Charles G. Norris. Photographed by Jackson Rose. With John Boles, Genevieve Tobin, Lois Wilson, ZaSu Pitts. (96 mins, B&W, 35mm, From UCLA Film & Television Archive)

$5.50 – BAM/PFA Members; UC Berkeley Students
$6.50 – UC Berkeley Faculty, Staff, and Retirees; Non-UC Berkeley Students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled Persons; Youth (17 & under)
$9.50 – General Admission

Macrocosms: Acrylics & Monotypes by Irene Nelson

Thursday, July 2nd, 2015 - Sunday, August 30th, 2015, 6:00 - 9:00PM

The Gallery @ Panorama Framing Inc.
3350 Grand Avenue

In Oakland

Macrocosms: Acrylics & Monotypes by Irene Nelson

Nelson states her works are acts of discovery, asking the continual, ‘what if?’ On her recent body of works featured in Macrocosms: Acrylics & Monotypes by Irene Nelson, she says, “I’m fascinated by the way that one move or gesture limits the field, or suggests a new direction. The process is a dance between thinking and not thinking, balancing patience with spontaneity. It is an act of faith.”

Working as a local artist and printmaker at Kala Institute in Berkeley (and with over 30 years experience working as a graphic designer in the Bay Area), Nelson considers herself a visual problem-solver. Incorporating a variety of mixed media design, etching, intaglio printing, and chine-collé into her unique design sense; Nelson subconsciously plots each resulting combination of techniques. She creates macrocosms - assemblages where viewers navigate a universe of shapes and brushstrokes punctuated with gestural etching marks and mixed media collage gathered from years of experience.

“Along the way, there are moments of surrender that resulted in the warmth and depth of the tones, subtle whites and smoky blacks—a richly expressive visual poetry uniting observation, image and process.”

As a designer, Nelson immerses herself in the creative process—working to discover imagery that has always already been there, or waiting for it to emerge—the creative process itself becomes the answer to the 'what if?' question. Her visual acuity has informed her painting and printmaking, leading her to exhibit her artwork throughout the Bay Area including San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (MOMA) Fort Mason Artist's Gallery.

Macrocosms: Acrylics & Monotypes by Irene Nelson
July 2nd – August 30th

First Thursday Artist Receptions:
July 2nd 6:00 – 9:00pm
August 6th 6:00 – 9:00pm

New Video Art from India: Other Species, Other Times (India/US/Mexico, 2001–14)

Thursday, July 2nd, 2015, 7:30pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

In a reversal of contemporary exhibition practices, this program presents single-channel video art and installations in a repertory film space, and suggests novel ways of considering bodies in movement. These bodies are neither discrete nor constant; they challenge borders and boundaries, and prefer entanglements with other species and other kinds. Varied in their consideration of the digital and in their use of performance practices, the works are primarily by artists living in Mumbai, Goa, and New Delhi.

A woman lies among pigeons in a public plaza in Logic of Birds, her body hospitable to their pecking and fluttering; man and bird merge in a play between painting and video in Man with Cockerel; an island sets the stage for bodies becoming other in Fjaka; and melting ice clocks the duration of a row in Iceboat. These performances of time and in space offer new utopias: a universe inhabited by myth and desire is the setting for the queer eco-fable Between the Waves; ancient ruins and spaceships offer a promise of time and space travel in the Forerunner; and a landscape comes to life in the liminal time between digital and analog in Night Noon.

Logic of Birds (Sonia Khurana, India, 2006, 5:44 mins, Color, Digital video, From the artist)

Man with Cockerel-2 (Ranbir Kaleka, India, 2004, 5:41 mins, Color/B&W, Digital video, From the artist)

Fjaka (Munir Kabani, Nikhil Chopra, Jana Prepeluh, India, 2014, 13:06 mins, Color, Digital video, From Chatterjee & Lal)

Iceboat (Neha Choksi, India, 2013, 13:17 mins, Color, Digital video, From Project 88)

Between the Waves: Channel 1, A Fable in Five Chapters (Tejal Shah, India, 2012, 26:14 mins, Color, Digital video, From Project 88)

Forerunner (Sahej Rahal, India, 2013, 12:13 mins, Color, Digital video, From Chatterjee & Lal)

Night Noon (Shambavi Kaul, US/Mexico, 2014, 11:38 mins, Color, Digital video, From the artist)

Total running time: c. 90 mins

La Ultima Latino Film Series

Thursday, July 2nd, 2015 - Thursday, July 2nd, 2015, July 2 @ 7:00 pm - 11:00 pm

La Pena
3105 Shattuck Ave.

In Berkeley

$10 General Admission, $8 Student and senior

La Gente Del Rio
MARTIN BENCHIMOL, PAUL APARO
Argentina, 2012, 70 minfull_size_la_gente
In a small strange town strange occurrences cause a security guard to be hired hopefully to stop these events.



La Ruta De La Luna
JUAN SEBASTIAN JACOME
Panama, 2013, 75min
A road trip with an albino son with poor eyesight trying to get his father to a doctor and the ailing father trying to get the son to a bowling tournament.

Latino film fest: June 11, June 18, July 2 and July 9 in the Theater, 2 showings per date: 7pm and 9pm

Full Line up: http://laultimasf.com/listing-berkeley.php

Body Language

Friday, July 3rd, 2015 - Saturday, August 8th, 2015

slate contemporary
473 25th St

In Oakland

This exhibition presents painting and mixed-media work by artists looking for a new contemporary language to represent the figure. With a long tradition of figure painting behind us, how do Bay Area artists make this genre their own? Featuring work by Terry Furry and Philippe Jestin in the gallery, with photography by Lisa Levine in the hall.

Oakland East Bay Symphony July 3 Fireworks

Friday, July 3rd, 2015 - Friday, July 3rd, 2015, 7/3/15, 7:00 PM - 10:00 PM

Craneway Pavilion
Harbour Way South @ Ford Point

In Richmond

The Oakland East Bay Symphony, the Craneway Pavilion, located inside the historic Ford Point Building on the waterfront in Richmond, and the City of Richmond will again join forces to host a family-friendly Independence Day Celebration led by the Oakland East Bay Symphony and Music Director Michael Morgan on Friday, July 3. The evening will also include pre-performance entertainment, food and fireworks. Craneway Pavilion, located on 25 waterfront acres, delivers spectacular views of the San Francisco skyline, with floor-to-ceiling windows throughout the entire event space as well as a 20,000 square foot patio, perfect for viewing the City of Richmond's firework display. The event is free to the public and in the seven years since its inception has become one of the Bay Area's most popular and talked-about Independence Day Celebrations. Paid parking will be available beginning at 5 pm and access to the Craneway Pavilion and Wharf will begin at 6:30 pm. Concert sponsors include the City of Richmond and Chevron, Mechanics Bank is a contributing sponsor and KDFC is the media sponsor. For more information, visit www.oebs.org or www.craneway.com. In addition to the annual July 3 concert and fireworks at the Craneway, Oakland East Bay Symphony will also perform on Independence Day, Saturday, July 4, at the Alameda County Fair.

Following pre-concert live music featuring performances by top local music groups. At 8 p.m. the Oakland East Bay Symphony, conducted by Music Director Michael Morgan, will begin its set of patriotic, spirited works to celebrate America's Independence Day including The Star Spangled Banner, Bernstein's Candide Overture, selections from Gershwin's Porgy & Bess, Songs from the American Songbook, a Sousa medley, music from The Sound of Music, Frozen and others. The City of Richmond's Firework Display will launch over the water just as the Symphony closes its program.

Presented by Oakland East Bay Symphony.

Free

The Unknown (Tod Browning, US, 1927)

Friday, July 3rd, 2015, 7:00pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Live Music/Judith Rosenberg on piano


A circus performer has his arms amputated to satisfy his lover’s strange desires in Tod Browning’s shocking tale of madness and love, one of Lon Chaney’s greatest performances and still one of the strangest films that Hollywood has ever produced. On the run from the police, a disabled crook takes refuge in the circus and becomes a knife thrower, and soon falls for the charms of a scantily clad carnival girl (Joan Crawford, in an early role), who cannot stand the touch of men. A novel solution is soon discovered, but desire and love, it seems, are fickle creatures. Embraced by the Surrealists as a testament to mad love and irrational desire, The Unknown was thought lost for years until Langlois discovered a 35mm print in the Cinémathèque. (Langlois later joked that one of the reasons it took so long to find was that they had too many prints in the collection labeled “Unknown.”) 

• Written by Waldemar Young from a story by Browning. Photographed by Merritt B. Gerstad. With Lon Chaney, Joan Crawford, Norman Kerry. (66 mins, Silent, B&W, 35mm@18fps, From Warner Bros.)

$5.50 – BAM/PFA Members; UC Berkeley Students
$6.50 – UC Berkeley Faculty, Staff, and Retirees; Non-UC Berkeley Students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled Persons; Youth (17 & under)
$9.50 – General Admission


Magnificent Obsession (John M. Stahl, US, 1935)

Friday, July 3rd, 2015, 8:30pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Robert Merrick (Robert Taylor) seems to be a magnet for morbid coincidences. First he’s indirectly responsible for a great doctor’s death, then the doctor’s widow (Irene Dunne) is blinded because of him. But further chance occurrences, plus a sort of spiritual pyramid scheme, will set this callow playboy on a path toward redemption. Questions of life and death, power and payment hover over what is, at its best, a tender love story. Magnificent Obsession was remade by Douglas Sirk, but Stahl’s evenly lit world of unlikely happenings has less in common with Sirk than with some imaginary hybrid of Borzage and Buñuel. 

• Written by Sarah Y. Mason, Victor Heerman, George O’Neil, based on the novel by Lloyd C. Douglas. Photographed by John J. Mescall. With Irene Dunne, Robert Taylor, Charles Butterworth, Betty Furness. (110 mins, B&W, 35mm, From Universal)

$5.50 – BAM/PFA Members; UC Berkeley Students
$6.50 – UC Berkeley Faculty, Staff, and Retirees; Non-UC Berkeley Students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled Persons; Youth (17 & under)
$9.50 – General Admission

Josh Shpak Band

Friday, July 3rd, 2015 - Friday, July 3rd, 2015, 9:00 pm - 10:00 pm

La Pena
3105 Shattuck Ave.

In Berkeley

$5 Adv/Stu/Snr. $7 Door

OPENER:

The Logan Kane Quintet is:
Logan Kane – Bass
Edward Evans – Trumpet
Eric Nakinishi – Alto
Justin Rock – Guitar
Michael Mitchell – Drums

HEADLINER:
Josh Shpak Band

JOSH SHPAK BAND

For his group, the Josh Shpak Band, rising trumpeter/composer Josh Shpak has collected a quintet of some of the brightest young talents in music today, creating a group steeped in the history of jazz, that – following in the footsteps of pioneers like Miles Davis, Herbie Hancock and Pat Metheny – creates a sonic palette more accessible to the young listeners of the modern era. ¡°I have often found that the main reason people of my generation steer away from jazz is not that the music is too complex, too angular, too tense¡¦it¡¯s because the very sounds that the musicians are using sound old, or outdated to them,¡± says Shpak. ¡°I¡¯d like to bring my music to these people in a way that makes their own favorite artists (whether they be Radiohead, Kendrick Lamar or The Beatles), be as relevant a part of our culture¡¯s musical history as John Coltrane¡±.

That¡¯s a high statement for someone so young, but as a protégé of jazz trumpet/flugelhorn legend, Clark Terry, this statement comes from a place of deep respect for the past. ¡°Every great musician in history has been completely present in his or her own time period, while using their knowledge of the tradition to drive their creative forces¡±.

The Boston/New York-based Josh Shpak Band has in its mission a deep commitment to collaboration, and has performed (along with others) with special guests sax giant George Garzone, guitar-innovator Nir Felder, Grammy-nominated pianist/arranger/educator Shelly Berg and bandleader/trumpeter/EVI master John Daversa.

The Josh Shpak Band¡¯s first EP, ¡°Astatic¡±, is being released in June of 2015. This collection of originals and arrangements by Shpak features guests ranging from a string quartet to Israeli harmonica virtuoso, Roni Eytan.

Gabriel Navia in concert

Friday, July 3rd, 2015 - Friday, July 3rd, 2015, Gabriel Navia in concert

La Pena
3105 Shattuck Ave.

In Berkeley

Advance tickets: $10 plus fee
Students / Kids / Seniors : $8 plus fee
Door: $15 plus fee

ABRIEL NAVIA •ALI PARIS • COLIN DOUGLAS

Live concert in the Bay Area
La Peña Cultural Center
A very special evening featuring world class musicians, Gabriel Navia, Ali Paris and Colin Douglas, the trio teams up with marvelous virtuosity radiating from different musical cultures from Bolivian, Arab and Spanish melodies to Cuban and Urban beats and through skillful combination and thrilling improvisation, master original and traditional works on Guitar, Qanun and Drums.
Some of the songs from ¡°MAR¡± the album by Gabriel Navia will be performed in the concert.
A show that will take from a high state of pure enjoyment while closing your eyes during spacy almost meditational moments to finding yourself almost jumping and moving to wild grooves this trio can create.
Gabriel Navia – Guitar
Ali Paris – Qanun
Colin Douglas – Drums
Live at La Peña Cultural Center
Friday July 3rd
8pm – 10pm .

Andrei Rublev (Andrei Tarkovsky, USSR, 1966)

Saturday, July 4th, 2015, 7:00pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Best Arthouse Film of All Time—The Guardian

Based on the life of the fifteenth-century Russian icon painter, Andrei Rublev uses history to confront the present, investigating not only humanity’s seemingly endless capacity for cruelty, but the responsibility of an artist to either fight it or record it. “I do not understand historical films which have no relevance to the present,” Tarkovsky wrote. “For me the most important thing is to use historical material to express Man’s ideas and to create contemporary characters.” The monk and painter Andrei Rublev, wandering through medieval barbarism and brutality, plays out the dilemmas facing every artist, every human, caught in a world spinning violently out of control. A grandly designed spectacle, as otherwordly and austere as Rublev’s own canvases (J. Hoberman called it “a superproduction gone ideologically berserk”), Andrei Rublev is an intense exploration of the need for faith—whether in God, in humanity, in nation, or in art—to make sense of life.

• Written by Andrei Konchalovsky, Tarkovsky. Photographed by Vadim Youssov. With Anatoli Solonitzine, Ivan Lapikov, Nikolai Grinko, Nikolai Sergeyev. (185 mins, In Russian with English subtitles, B&W/Color, ’Scope, 35mm, From Kino Lorber)

$5.50 – BAM/PFA Members; UC Berkeley Students
$6.50 – UC Berkeley Faculty, Staff, and Retirees; Non-UC Berkeley Students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled Persons; Youth (17 & under)
$9.50 – General Admission

It’s a Gift (Norman Z. McLeod, US, 1934)

Sunday, July 5th, 2015, 4:30pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Harold Bissonette is trying to shave, performing a complicated and dangerous dance around his obliviously preening daughter in front of the bathroom mirror. "You want me to cut my throat?" he mutters. Family life could drive him to it. This New Jersey shopkeeper is the quintessential Fieldsian paterfamilias, on the razor's edge between meek compliance and antisocial behavior. Persecuted by a harridan wife, irascible and incompetent customers, and the ever-terrifying Baby LeRoy, all Mr. Bissonette can do is dream of packing up the flivver and making for California—a dream that eventually comes true, but not exactly as expected, and not before our unfortunate hero has been made to run a gauntlet of hilarious set pieces. Though Fields's famous misanthropy is less vehement here than in some of his other films, his view of human society is reflected in Mr. Bissonette's version of bliss: a tall glass of gin, a little orange, and sweet solitude.

• Written by Jack Cunningham, based on a story by J. P. McEvoy, Charles Bogle (W. C. Fields). Photographed by Henry Sharp. With W. C. Fields, Baby LeRoy, Kathleen Howard, Jean Rouverol. (73 mins, B&W, 35mm, From Universal)

Preceded by:

The Dentist (Leslie Pearce, US, 1932)
Leaving bent clubs and shattered teeth in his wake, Fields rages against the forces of convention.
(20 mins, B&W, 35mm, From Cohen Media)

Total running time: 93 mins

$5.50 – BAM/PFA Members; UC Berkeley Students
$6.50 – UC Berkeley Faculty, Staff, and Retirees; Non-UC Berkeley Students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled Persons; Youth (17 & under)
$9.50 – General Admission

Back Street (John M. Stahl, US, 1932)

Sunday, July 5th, 2015, 6:30pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Stahl adapts Fannie Hurst’s bestselling novel into a surprisingly clear-eyed and devastating story about what happens when a woman has nothing but a man, and not much of him. Bright, sought-after Ray Schmidt (Irene Dunne), “the toniest girl in Cincinnati,” falls for Walter (John Boles), but chance prevents them from pursuing their romance—until years later, after he’s married someone else. The ironies in Ray’s decades-long loyalty to her lost-and-found lover are keenly evident, as when she advises a neighbor against carrying on with a married man, then runs right back into Walter’s arms. Yet, unlike many of the characters, Stahl seems to withhold judgment in favor of calm observation. As Tom Milne wrote in Time Out, “Stahl counters the danger of sentimentality by maintaining an even, beautifully controlled monotone (very moving in its quietude) that establishes a discreet distance between his camera and the excesses of the plot. One thinks, oddly, of Ozu and Dreyer.”

• Written by Gladys Lehman, based on the novel by Fannie Hurst. Photographed by Karl Freund. With Irene Dunne, John Boles, George Meeker, ZaSu Pitts. (93 mins, B&W, 35mm, From Universal)

$5.50 – BAM/PFA Members; UC Berkeley Students
$6.50 – UC Berkeley Faculty, Staff, and Retirees; Non-UC Berkeley Students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled Persons; Youth (17 & under)
$9.50 – General Admission

Venezuelans Without Borders

Monday, July 6th, 2015 - Sunday, July 5th, 2015, 1:30 pm - 4:00 pm

La Pena
3105 Shattuck Ave.

In Berkeley

De parte Venezolanos Sin Fronteras.
Próximo Evento¡¦.
Día: 5 de Julio de 2015
Lugar: Centro Cultural La Peña
Dirección: 3105 Shattuck Ave. Berkeley, CA 9470
Hora: 1:30pm – 4:00pm
En ese evento disfrutaremos de:
Presentaciones Musicales (Detalles en unos dias)
Subasta
Venta de Accesorios Venezolanos, tales como: franelas, calcomanias, bufandas, bolsas y banderas
Comida y bebidas en La Peña
__________
On behalf of Venezuelans Without Borders.
Next Event¡¦
July 5th 2015
La Peña Cultural Center
3105 Shattuck Ave. Berkeley, CA 94705
1:30 – 4:00pm
Performance with Venezuelan folk music – TBA
Shirts, stickers, scarf, jewelry, bags and flags available
Food and drinks @ La Peña¡¯s restaurant
Silent auction

Family Dance Training Institute

Monday, July 6th, 2015 - Friday, July 10th, 2015, 9am-5pm

Luna Dance Institute
605 Addison St.

In Berkeley

Join Luna faculty for an exciting and informative 4-day intensive workshop on teaching family dance.The Family Dance Institute provides time and space to learn how to build dynamic relationship-strengthening dance programs in your community! Social justice workers, early education teachers, therapists, dance teachers and parents will all benefit. $525. Register at http://lunadanceinstitute.org/pl-register/.

SmArtGallery Opening

Wednesday, July 8th, 2015 - Wednesday, July 8th, 2015, 4:30 PM to 9:00 PM

Sofitel San Francisco Bay
223 Twin Dolphin Drive, Redwood City, A 94065

In

Sofitel San Francisco Bay is finding a fresh way to engage with guests and the local art community as the it becomes the first Sofitel location worldwide to feature an interactive and digital art gallery onsite. Locals, hotel patrons and aesthetes are invited to indulge in a special grand opening reception on Wednesday, July 8 from 4:30 – 6PM as Sofitel San Francisco Bay’s lounge transforms into a multi-sensory art gallery. This unique art exhibit is made possible thanks to a partnership between Sofitel San Francisco Bay and Daylighted, a San Francisco-based fine art consultancy and services company. Light bites, refreshments and live entertainment will be provided throughout the event.

As part of the festivities, guests are encouraged to circulate among the seven, ultra-HD, color-corrected SmArtGallery monitors – all 55 inches in size and showcasing carefully curated artworks selected from Daylighted’s deep network of local artists. This innovative technology also allows for the hotel to continually refresh and fine tune its décor with unprecedented flexibility. Featured art will include works from talented emerging and mid-career artists including abstract painter am Stöhr, award winning photographer Hal Eastman and mixed-media artist Derek James Lynch.

"I am delighted to exhibit my artwork with Daylighted. I think their approach — putting art in nontraditional places is an exciting development for me and other artists who are looking to connect with new audiences," says featured artist am Stöhr.

Though this event is free and open to the public, space is limited. Immediately following the art gallery reception, guests are invited to grab a handcrafted cocktail from the hotel’s Bay Bar and heighten their auditory senses with Sofitel’s weekly jazz concert with famed saxophonist Michael O’Neill from 6 to 9PM.


Nana (Jean Renoir, France, 1926)

Wednesday, July 8th, 2015, 7:30pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Imported Print!
Live Music/Judith Rosenberg on piano

Renoir's first full-length vehicle for his wife, Catherine Hessling, was later called by Renoir "my first film worth talking about." It is Emile Zola filtered through "a study of French gesture as reflected in the paintings of my father and the other artists of his generation," and through Erich von Stroheim's Foolish Wives, with its fascination with the fantastic in the real. Hessling, as the Second Empire actress turned courtesan, is a virtual spinning top, a dancing and miming vortex who draws men to destruction and finally is herself destroyed. Nana was a financial disaster for Renoir, but today it is considered one of the first modern French films. In Renoir's own oeuvre, it looks very far forward—through the "bitch" in La Chienne to the humanity of Elena and Her Men and French Cancan. Marveling at Hessling’s performance and Renoir’s direction, Langlois simply wrote, “He let her live in front of the camera . . . but one cannot be Auguste Renoir’s son and get away with just that; the film was full of images that continually evoke Manet, Degas, and Renoir.”

• Written by Pierre Lestringuez, based on the novel by Emile Zola. Photographed by Edmund Corwin, Jean Bachelet. With Catherine Hessling, Jean Angelo, Werner Krauss, Valeska Gert. (150 mins, Silent, B&W, 35mm, From La Cinémathèque française)

$5.50 – BAM/PFA Members; UC Berkeley Students
$6.50 – UC Berkeley Faculty, Staff, and Retirees; Non-UC Berkeley Students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled Persons; Youth (17 & under)
$9.50 – General Admission

The Steamroller and the Violin (Andrei Tarkovsky, USSR, 1961)

Thursday, July 9th, 2015, 7:30pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

A frail young violinist and a gruff steamroller operator strike up an unlikely friendship in Tarkovsky’s skillful diploma film from the Soviet film academy, VGIK. A student film in name only, The Steamroller and the Violin holds the seeds of Tarkovsky’s future career, both in its theme of artistic survival and, more importantly, in its credits: it was here that Tarkovsky met his future cameraman and composer. It was cowritten with Andrei Konchalovsky, who would himself become a great Soviet filmmaker.

• Written by Tarkovsky and Andrei Konchalovsky from a story by S. Bakhmetyeva. Photographed by Vadim Yusov. With Igor Fomchenko, Vladimir Zamanskiy, Marina Adzhubei. (46 mins, In Russian with English subtitles, B&W, DVD, From Facets)

Followed By:

Voyage in Time (Italy, 1983)
Two great artists unite in this visual diary of Tarkovsky and screenwriter Tonino Guerra’s travels across Lecce, Tuscany, and the Amalfi Coast while location scouting for Nostalghia (screening 7.18.15).
(62 mins, In Italian and Russian with English subtitles, Color, DVD, From Facets)

Total running time: 108 mins

$5.50 – BAM/PFA Members; UC Berkeley Students
$6.50 – UC Berkeley Faculty, Staff, and Retirees; Non-UC Berkeley Students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled Persons; Youth (17 & under)
$9.50 – General Admission

Mary Poppins

Thursday, July 9th, 2015 - Sunday, July 19th, 2015, 8:00 pm

Woodminster Amphitheater
Joaquin Miller Park, 3300 Joaquin Miller Road

In Oakland

One of the most popular Disney movies of all time is capturing hearts in a whole new way: as a practically perfect musical! The jack-of-all trades, Bert, introduces us to England in 1910 and the troubled Banks family. Using a combination of magic and common sense, the magical nanny, Mary Poppins, must teach the family how to value each other again. Wonderful, familiar songs including "Chim-Chim Cher-ee," "A Spoonful of Sugar," and "Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious."

Performed by a cast of 46 and a live professional orchestra, outdoors, under the stars, in historic Woodminster Amphitheater in Oakland's beautiful hillside Joaquin Miller Park. Come early and enjoy a picnic with your family, a walk in this hillside park, and the beautiful bay views. As the sun sets, take your seats in the amphitheater and enjoy an evening of music and magic under the stars.

July 9 is a Preview, the final dress rehearsal, and all tickets are $18 at the door, open seating, no discounts or promos. Regular performances are July 10, 11, 12, 16, 17, 18, 19. Tickets are $28-$59 (reserved seats) with discounts available for children, seniors, and groups. Kids Come Free program allows an adult paying full price to bring a child or teen (up to 16) to any regular performance for free. (No Kids Come Free for the Preview.)

Nazarin (Luis Buñuel, Mexico, 1958)

Friday, July 10th, 2015, 7:00pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Certainly one of the most beautifully photographed of all Luis Buñuel’s films, Nazarín captures the harsh Mexican landscape for a tale of a turn-of-the-century wandering cleric who has shed his priest’s garments in hopes of comforting the poor, free from the Church’s chastising shadow. He is accompanied by two desperate women and an assortment of life’s outcasts. His is a Christlike effort, to wring charity out of a peasantry locked into the absurd cruelty of their environment, but also locked into the very material reality of being human. Like Preston Sturges’s Sullivan in his Travels, Nazarín’s experience among the wretched teaches him the nature of escape. Fellow Surrealist Ado Kyrou wrote of this film, “Nazarín is a dazzling explosion in which form and substance, thought and action, are fused in the multi-tongued fires of the necessary.”

• Written by Buñuel, Julio Alejandro, from the novel by Benito Pérez Galdós. Photographed by Gabriel Figueroa. With Francisco Rabal, Marga López, Rita Macedo, Jesús Fernández. (91 mins, In Spanish with English subtitles, B&W, 35mm, From Filmoteca de la UNAM, permission Televisa)

$5.50 – BAM/PFA Members; UC Berkeley Students
$6.50 – UC Berkeley Faculty, Staff, and Retirees; Non-UC Berkeley Students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled Persons; Youth (17 & under)
$9.50 – General Admission

The Foxes of Harrow (John M. Stahl, US, 1947)

Friday, July 10th, 2015, 8:50pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Studio Print!

In antebellum New Orleans, Irish gambler Stephen Fox (Rex Harrison) wins a plantation and a beautiful, aristocratic wife (Maureen O’Hara), but can he master them? With its tale of tumultuous romance in an opulent, overheated Old South, The Foxes of Harrow was seen as an answer to Gone with the Wind. But Foxes draws a darker picture of the Southern culture of power and property, suggesting disturbing parallels between marriage and slavery. The script was loosely based on a novel by Frank Yerby, the first African American author to sell a book to a Hollywood studio. 

• Written by Wanda Tuchock, based on the novel by Frank Yerby. Photographed by Joseph LaShelle. With Rex Harrison, Maureen O’Hara, Richard Haydn, Victor McLaglen. (117 mins, B&W, 35mm, From 20th Century Fox Library, permission Criterion Pictures)

$5.50 – BAM/PFA Members; UC Berkeley Students
$6.50 – UC Berkeley Faculty, Staff, and Retirees; Non-UC Berkeley Students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled Persons; Youth (17 & under)
$9.50 – General Admission

Family Free Day

Saturday, July 11th, 2015 - Saturday, July 11th, 2015, 1-4PM

Richmond Museum of History
400 Nevin ave

In Richmond

Visit the Richmond Museum of History FREE on Saturday July 11, 2015 in celebration of two new temporary exhibits.

Richmond Day at Panama Pacific International Exposition
The RMH is commemorating the 100th anniversary of PPIE with an exhibit of artifacts from the permanent collection. The modest display, located in the southwest corner of the permanent gallery, includes souvenirs, ribbons, postcards, and photographs from the San Francisco 1915 expo. Several objects relate directly to Richmond Day at the expo, which took place August 7, 1915 to mark the 10th anniversary of the incorporation of the City of Richmond.

Music in Richmond
The exhibit about music in the Richmond is a visual survey of artifacts, photographs, and documents all relating to making music in Richmond through time. We reached deep into the museum’s permanent collection to amass a group of materials to stimulate thought and delight the eyes. Commonly held musical preferences will reflect the composition of a community and musical tastes in Richmond have changed as our community has changed. The exhibit will survey music from the late 19th century, to the early 20th Century and the formation of the Richmond Musicians Union 424 in 1907, through the World War II Home Front, the Post War North Richmond Blues Clubs and the Richmond Auditorium. We are excited that the exhibit will feature information about musical performances from the more recent past including the 70s, 80s and 90s and today

Prix de beauté (Augusto Genina, France, 1930)

Saturday, July 11th, 2015, 6:30pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Imported Print!
Live Music/ Judith Rosenberg on piano

(Miss Europa 1930)
Living humbly in Rochester, New York, the great silent-era actress Louise Brooks was rediscovered and thrust back into the spotlight in 1955 by Langlois and George Eastman House curator James Card. In 1958 Langlois invited her to Paris for a retrospective of her works, and her legend was solidified. “You have created a new Louise Brooks, entirely yours,” Brooks wrote to Langlois in 1959. Featuring Brooks in her last major role (at age twenty-four), Prix de beauté has a history as illustrious and troubled as its star's. Based on a treatment by G.W. Pabst, it was scripted as a silent by its intended director, René Clair. But Clair left the project when he was forced to rework the script for the addition of sound, and direction was taken over by Augusto Genina, who, with master cinematographer Rudolph Maté, brought an air of actuality to this tale of a Parisian typist who wins a beauty contest and a movie contract, only to face the violent disapproval of her husband. The simple plot becomes a potent vehicle for reflections on the mechanics of celebrity and the power of the photograph. Melodrama and real life ironically converge in the breathtaking ending, with the tragically mortal heroine juxtaposed against her own immortal filmic image—the image of Brooks, a timeless star whose meteoric career was already beginning its rapid decline. 

• Photographed by Rudolph Maté. With Louise Brooks, Georges Charlia, Jean Bradin, Augusto Bandini. (108 mins, Silent, French intertitles translated live, B&W, 35mm, From La Cinémathèque française)

$5.50 – BAM/PFA Members; UC Berkeley Students
$6.50 – UC Berkeley Faculty, Staff, and Retirees; Non-UC Berkeley Students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled Persons; Youth (17 & under)
$9.50 – General Admission


The Mirror (Andrei Tarkovsky, USSR, 1974)

Saturday, July 11th, 2015, 8:45pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

(Zerkalo)
Shards of memories—dreams of an individual, collective nightmares—do not merely haunt Tarkovsky's most challenging work, they are the film, which invents, as Ingmar Bergman noted, "a new language, true to the nature of film . . . life as a dream." Ostensibly an autobiographical portrait, The Mirror also offers a crash course in twentieth-century history, as stock footage of world upheavals—the Spanish Civil War, the Siege of Leningrad, the Cultural Revolution—intertwine with images of childhood: a field, a fire in a rainstorm, a father's voice, a mother (played by various actresses, including Tarkovsky's own mother). "I can speak," a once stuttering boy clearly states, but only after being hypnotized; indeed, The Mirror seems refracted from a hypnotized world, where images reveal more than language ever could. "Words cannot express a person's emotions; they are too inert," insists a poem written and read by Tarkovsky's father; Tarkovsky's art, however, does just that.

• Written by Tarkovsky. Photographed by Georgi Rerberg. With Margareta Terekhova, Philip Yankovsky, Oleg Yankovsky, L.Tarkovskaya. (106 mins, In Russian with English subtitles, B&W/Color, 35mm, From Kino Lorber)

$5.50 – BAM/PFA Members; UC Berkeley Students
$6.50 – UC Berkeley Faculty, Staff, and Retirees; Non-UC Berkeley Students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled Persons; Youth (17 & under)
$9.50 – General Admission

Looking Back and Seeing Now: New Work by Lava Thomas

Saturday, July 11th, 2015 - Sunday, August 23rd, 2015, Opening Reception: Saturday, July 11, 5 p.m. - 7 p.m.

Berkeley Art Center
1275 Walnut Street

In Berkeley

West Coast artist Lava Thomas has created a site-specific installation that transforms the gallery into a unique site of reflection. The exhibition centers on a kinetic installation comprised of over one hundred tambourines suspended dramatically from the gallery's ceiling. The tambourines are affixed with eyes that are depicted in large-scale drawings based on photographs from Thomas' grandmother's photo album. Mirrors incorporated into the space and relative position is continually subject to the mirrors' gentle rotations.

Artist Talk: Closing Reception of Many Streams with Martin Webb

Sunday, July 12th, 2015, 3-6pm

The Compound Gallery
1167 65th St

In Oakland

Come visit The Compound Gallery to see Martin Webb's latest intuitive and resourceful works while enjoying tasty treats and tea. An informal discussion of the latest works in his show Many Streams will begin at 4pm. Don't miss this opportunity to ask him about his craft and peer into the inspirations behind his methods.

Way Out West (James W. Horne, US, 1937)

Sunday, July 12th, 2015, 4:00pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

New Preservation Prints!

In one of their best-loved comedies, Stan and Ollie travel to Brushwood Gulch to deliver a deed to a gold mine to its rightful inheritor. When a shady saloon owner and his dance-hall girlfriend scheme to take it for themselves, it’s up to the Boys to put things right, in bungling slapstick fashion, with some endearing musical numbers along the way.

• Written by Charles Rogers, Felix Adler, James Parrott. Photographed by Art Lloyd, Walter Lundin. With Stan Laurel, Oliver Hardy, Sharon Lynne, James Finlayson. (65 mins, 35mm preservation print, Courtesy UCLA Film & Television Archive, preservation funding provided by The Film Foundation, permission Sonar Entertainment)

Preceded by:

Helpmates (James Parrott, US, 1932)
Ollie enlists Stan’s help to clean his house after a wild party.
(21 mins, B&W, 35mm preservation print, Courtesy UCLA Film & Television Archive, permission Sonar Entertainment)

The Midnight Patrol (Lloyd French, US, 1933)
As novice police officers, the
duo has an eventful night on the job.
(20 mins, B&W, 35mm preservation print, Courtesy UCLA Film & Television Archive, permission Sonar Entertainment)

Total running time: 104 mins

$5.50 – BAM/PFA Members; UC Berkeley Students
$6.50 – UC Berkeley Faculty, Staff, and Retirees; Non-UC Berkeley Students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled Persons; Youth (17 & under)
$9.50 – General Admission

Earth (Alexander Dovzhenko, USSR, 1930)

Sunday, July 12th, 2015, 6:15pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Earth is the masterpiece of the great Ukrainian director Dovzhenko; it is also his most experimental film. There seems to be a mad logic to its imagery, like the mad dance of its hero, Vasili, down the moonlit road to his death. Yet each startling image is precisely linked to the others, much as the peasants are linked through their shared passions, miseries, and mysteries. This is how Dovzhenko tells a story—a rather simple one of Ukrainian villagers coming to terms with collective farming against the brutal resistance of the kulaks and the more subtle resistance of tradition. The familiar catalog of earthly symbols here reaches an apotheosis, a daring poetry in the treatment of people and animals alike. A horse is made to "talk"; a grieving young widow wails, naked, totally exposed; the cycle of death in life is expressed in a serene surrealism.

• Written by Dovzhenko. Photographed by Danylo Demutsky. With Semyon Svashenko, Stepan Shkurat, Julia Solntseva. (81 mins, Silent with English intertitles, B&W, 35mm@18fps, BAM/PFA Collection)

$5.50 – BAM/PFA Members; UC Berkeley Students
$6.50 – UC Berkeley Faculty, Staff, and Retirees; Non-UC Berkeley Students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled Persons; Youth (17 & under)
$9.50 – General Admission


MaMuse CD Release Celebration of ¡°Heart Nouveau¡±

Sunday, July 12th, 2015 - Sunday, July 12th, 2015, 7:30 pm

La Pena
3105 Shattuck Ave.

In Berkeley

$15 Adv, $25 Door

With their roots in the folk and gospel traditions and their hearts rooted in the present moment, MaMuse is pleased to present to you their brand new CD ¡°Heart Nouveau¡±. Come enjoy exquisitely blended heartfelt harmonic voices lifted with purpose and reverence above sultry strings and deep percussion. Be here to witness and partake in this truly moving musical offering of ¡°New Heart¡±.

Moonshine Jelly

Sunday, July 12th, 2015 - Sunday, July 12th, 2015, 9:00 pm - 10:00 pm

La Pena
3105 Shattuck Ave.

In Berkeley

$5 Adv/Stu/Snr, $7 Door

¡°Power-house acoustic trio Moonshine Jelly consists of violinist and vocalist Lee White, mandolinist, vocalist and songwriter Justine Lucas, and guitarist and filmmaker Kent Kessinger. This bluegrass-celtic-gypsy-swing folk band adds contemporary context to ancient folk songs of Eastern Europe, the British Isles, and the Americas. With their intimate voices, unpredictable harmonies, and performance intensity, this up-and-coming band is not only reviving but transforming traditional musics of the world.¡±

Golden Gate International Youth Choral Festival Opening Concert

Monday, July 13th, 2015 - Monday, July 13th, 2015, 7/13/15, 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM

Oakland Scottish Rite Center
1547 Lakeside Drive

In Oakland

More than 650 young vocal artists will convene in the East Bay for the tenth triennial Golden Gate International Children's and Youth Choral Festival July 13-18 presented by Piedmont East Bay Children's Choir. The young singers--who represent 21 choirs from eight countries on four continents-will come together to perform, compete and sing during a week of public concerts and workshops throughout the Bay Area culminating in the highly anticipated presentation of the 650 voice combined mega-chorus. The Festival opens with a Parade of Flags and Concert the evening of July 13 featuring all 21 choruses performing individually giving audiences a taste of the virtuosity and versatility to come during the week. The week features daily free public concerts and competitions, a special concert featuring the world-renowned Estonian Television Girls Choir, a new work, Pandora's Gift, by American composer Mark Winges and staged by choreographer Erika Chong Shuch, and culminates in a Grand Awards Concert featuring the winners of the competitions and all 21 choruses combined to perform collaborative repertoire learned during the Festival week.

One of the world's most celebrated gatherings of young singers, the Golden Gate International Children's and Youth Choral Festival attracts choirs from all over the globe to perform, compete, and build international friendships. Founded in 1991, the Golden Gate Festival is sponsored every three years by the Piedmont East Bay Children's Choir in the San Francisco Bay Area. It remains one of the only opportunities for children's and youth choirs to meet and compete on an international field in the United States. Since its founding, the event has brought nearly 5,000 young musicians in nearly 100 choirs from more than two dozen countries together performing for more than 60,000 audience members from throughout Northern California.

Presented by Golden Gate Festival.

$18-$42.

The River (Jean Renoir, France, 1950)

Wednesday, July 15th, 2015, 7:30pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

“A movie set in India must have certain essential elements: tigers, Bengal lancers, and elephants,” recalled Jean Renoir about the advice of film financiers. “In The River, there are no tigers, Bengal lancers, or elephants.” Disillusioned after a spell in Hollywood, Renoir journeyed to India (and allied himself with Satyajit Ray) for this lyrical adaptation of author Rumer Godden’s coming-of-age tale set alongside the River Ganges. Into a bucolic expat community of schoolgirls and widowers arrives a wounded American war veteran, his presence awakening a host of desires. “That’s funny; I often hate men,” coos one teenaged temptress, who quickly takes up smoking. “Mother, am I beautiful?” asks another. “You have . . . an interesting face,” Mumsy replies. Renoir subtly contrasts the momentary experiences of first love and other tragedies against the river’s (and India’s) eternal beauty, expertly captured by Claude Renoir in eye-popping Technicolor. Droll, painterly, and wise, The River offers a lesson in purity of cinema, and life. "We go on as if nothing has happened,” a daughter complains after a tragedy. “No we don’t," replies a mother. "We just go on.” For Víctor Erice, it is "an extraordinary example of how the cinema becomes a means of knowledge, an open window onto the world."

• Written by Renoir, Rumer Godden, from the novel by Godden. Photographed by Claude Renoir. With Patricia Walters, Radha, Adrienne Corri, Nora Swinburne. (99 mins, Color, 35mm, BAM/PFA Collection, permission Janus/Criterion Collection)

$5.50 – BAM/PFA Members; UC Berkeley Students
$6.50 – UC Berkeley Faculty, Staff, and Retirees; Non-UC Berkeley Students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled Persons; Youth (17 & under)
$9.50 – General Admission

Golden Gate International Youth Choral Festival 'Out of the Box'

Thursday, July 16th, 2015 - Thursday, July 16th, 2015, 7/16/15, 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM

Oakland Scottish Rite Center
1547 Lakeside Drive

In Oakland

A performance by the Estonian Television Choir followed by a presentation of Pandora's Gift, a new work crafted by highly acclaimed director/ choreographer Erika Chong Shuch, award winning local poet Denise Newman, and critically acclaimed and internationally performed composer, Mark Winges, in a fully staged piece featuring Volti and Ensemble from the Piedmont Children's Choirs. Following Pandora's Gift will be a special showing of the documentary, "To Breathe as One."

More than 650 young vocal artists convene in the East Bay for the tenth triennial Golden Gate International Children's and Youth Choral Festival July 13-18 presented by Piedmont East Bay Children's Choir. The young singers--who represent 21 choirs from eight countries on four continents-will come together to perform, compete and sing during a week of public concerts and workshops throughout the Bay Area culminating in the presentation of the 650 voice combined mega-chorus. The Festival opens with a Parade of Flags and Concert the evening of July 13 featuring all 21 choruses performing individually giving audiences a taste of the virtuosity and versatility to come during the week.

Presented by Golden Gate Festival.

$18-$42.

Solaris (Andrei Tarkovsky, USSR, 1972)

Thursday, July 16th, 2015, 7:30pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

On the planet Solaris, scientists believe, the ocean's surface has an intelligence that can absorb human memory and materialize the objects of our thoughts. Psychologist Chris Kelvin joins the veteran cosmonauts in the Solaris project only to find them maddened from years of literally cohabitating with their unconscious desires. Kelvin himself becomes host to the presence of his dead wife and seems doomed to relive both the passion and the loss associated with her memory. "Outer space" plays almost no part in Tarkovsky's science fiction, which relies on widescreen composition to paint a landscape of the mind, and static images that reverberate with their stillness in a timeless, lush land that could be Heaven, but is meant to be the country home of Kelvin's youth. Tarkovsky initiates us into the secret of Solaris: that, like the oceans of the distant planet, the cinema serves up the most poetic longings of the human imagination.

• Written by Tarkovsky, Friedrich Gorenstein, from the novel by Stanislaw Lem. Photographed by Vadim Yusov. With Donatas Banionis, Natalya Bondarchuk, Yuri Jarvet, Anatoli Solonitsin. (167 mins, In Russian with English subtitles, Color, 35mm, From Kino Lorber)

$5.50 – BAM/PFA Members; UC Berkeley Students
$6.50 – UC Berkeley Faculty, Staff, and Retirees; Non-UC Berkeley Students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled Persons; Youth (17 & under)
$9.50 – General Admission

Luna Dance Summer Institute

Friday, July 17th, 2015 - Friday, July 24th, 2015

Luna Dance Institute
605 Addison St.

In Berkeley

Luna's Summer Institute brings six dance teaching artists and six classroom teachers/practitioners together to activate and inspire individual and collective imaginations. Participants will work together to create, expand or improve comprehensive dance education programs at no cost to those selected.

For an application contact Jochelle Perena; jperena@lunadanceinstitute.org/510-883-1118.
Applications are due April 13th, 2015.

Holy Matrimony (John M. Stahl, US, 1943)

Friday, July 17th, 2015, 7:00pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Studio Print!

This droll fable of class and authenticity reveals Stahl as a capable director of comedy. In pre–World War I England, celebrated and misanthropic painter Priam Farll (Monty Woolley) takes advantage of a case of mistaken identity to escape an impending knighthood. While his freshly deceased valet Henry Leek (perennial “gentleman’s gentleman” Eric Blore) lies in state at Westminster, Farll adopts Leek’s persona as well as his mail-order sweetheart, Alice (Gracie Fields), who quickly bustles Farll off to the chintzy comforts of Putney. There they live together in quiet contentment—until the insatiable art market finds Farll, and a scandalized nation is left to question the distinctions between gentleman and servant, genius and fraud. The film benefits from its appealingly unconventional lead couple and from a crowd of memorable character actors, including Una O’Connor as a querulous widow and Laird Cregar as a gallerist who puts the con in connoisseurship.

• Written by Nunnally Johnson, based on the play The Great Adventure by Arnold Bennett. Photographed by Lucien Ballard. With Monty Woolley, Gracie Fields, Laird Cregar, Una O’Connor. (87 mins, B&W, 35mm, From 20th Century Fox Library, permission Criterion Pictures)

They Live By Night (Nicholas Ray, US, 1949)

Friday, July 17th, 2015, 8:45pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Fugitive lovers on the run from nightmare America—drab, mercenary, and insanely competitive—create their own fantasy world full of charm and playful naiveté in Ray's contribution to l'amour fou. Bowie (Farley Granger), an escaped convict, and Keechie (Cathy O'Donnell) are innocents who were "never properly introduced to the world we live in." Like Henry Fonda and Sylvia Sidney in You Only Live Once, they are "the last romantic couple"—romance in its true, not kitsch, sense being the only defense against a cruel world. Already in this astonishing first film, Ray's style is striking in its compactness and expressive mise-en-scène, and personal in its peculiarly nervous existentialism. The tenderness of the love story contrasts sharply with the noir elements of the genre. Víctor Erice coauthored a wonderful critical study of Nicolas Ray and his Rebel Without a Cause was a formative influence on El Sur.

• Written by Charles Schnee, based on the novel Thieves Like Us by Edward Anderson. Photographed by George E. Diskant. With Cathy O’Donnell, Farley Granger, Howard Da Silva, Jay C. Flippen. (95 mins, B&W, 35mm, From Warner Bros. Classics)

$5.50 – BAM/PFA Members; UC Berkeley Students
$6.50 – UC Berkeley Faculty, Staff, and Retirees; Non-UC Berkeley Students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled Persons; Youth (17 & under)
$9.50 – General Admission

Kristachuwan/Lesionread Tour 2015

Friday, July 17th, 2015 - Friday, July 17th, 2015, 9:00 pm - 11:00 pm

La Pena
3105 Shattuck Ave.

In Berkeley

$5 Adv/Stu/Snr, $7 Door

Opening by Ghost 2 Coast: https://soundcloud.com/ghost2coast
featuring NYC¡¯s Kristachuwan Electronic music with elements of jazz, funk and old-school electro
Kristachuwan, Lesionread, Ghost to Coast, and Logan Locking.

Kristachuwan uses electronics to build soundscapes that are textural yet melodic,
with elements of jazz, funk, and old-school electro. Kristachuwan hails from New York, where he stands out in the prolific electronic scene, with his innovative use of saxophone and the theatrical elements of his delivery. He also utilizes video projections and live video art to enhance the atmosphere. A solo musician, his sound fills a room, and yet his gear fits on a card table. Kristachuwan has performed alongside such diverse acts as Phantogram, Future Islands, Neon Indian, and Holy Fuck.

Here is a link to Kristachuwan¡¯s EPKs:
http://kristachuwan.com/epk.html

La chienne (Jean Renoir, France, 1931)

Saturday, July 18th, 2015, 6:30pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Imported Print!

(aka The Bitch)
"What happens with great actors, and consequently with Michel Simon, is that they unmask you, bring dreams that you've had, but haven't expressed, to light” (Jean Renoir). In La chienne, Michel Simon is an unhappily married middle-aged bank clerk whose only passion in life is painting, which he does in his spare time, until he becomes obsessed with a prostitute (Janie Marèze). She plays him for the tragic sucker he is. Unlike Fritz Lang's remake, Scarlet Street, as Bertrand Augst points out, Renoir's protagonist has no remorse. The film is infused with a sadomasochistic sexuality that is both heightened and tempered by Renoir's camera, which (Renoir said) followed "the slightest detour of (Simon's) thoughts"—through windows, through time, truly through depth of field. In Renoir's first major sound film, shot on location, sync (rather than mixed) sound is brilliantly used: "Not only is the caustic criticism of French society most explicitly depicted in the mise-en-scène, but the soundtrack dramatizes very effectively the underlying social conflicts which characterize this society" (Augst).

• Written by Renoir, André Girard, from the novel by George de la Fouchardière. With Michel Simon, Janie Mareze, Georges Flamant. (100 mins, In French with English subtitles, B&W, DCP, From La Cinémathèque française, Restored and digitized by Les Films du Jeudi and La Cinémathèque française, with the support of the CNC and the Franco-American Cultural Fund - DGA MPA SACEM WGA)

$5.50 – BAM/PFA Members; UC Berkeley Students
$6.50 – UC Berkeley Faculty, Staff, and Retirees; Non-UC Berkeley Students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled Persons; Youth (17 & under)
$9.50 – General Admission

Golden Gate International Youth Choral Festival Closing Concert

Saturday, July 18th, 2015 - Saturday, July 18th, 2015, 7/18/15, 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM

Oakland Scottish Rite Center
1547 Lakeside Drive

In Oakland

The final public performance culminating more than 650 young vocal artists from around the world in the East Bay for the tenth triennial Golden Gate International Children's and Youth Choral Festival July 13-18 presented by Piedmont East Bay Children's Choir. The young singers--who represent 21 choirs from eight countries on four continents-will come together to perform, compete and sing during a week of public concerts and workshops throughout the Bay Area culminating in the highly anticipated presentation of the 650 voice combined mega-chorus. The Festival opens with a Parade of Flags and Concert the evening of July 13 featuring all 21 choruses performing individually giving audiences a taste of the virtuosity and versatility to come during the week. The week features daily free public concerts and competitions, a special concert featuring the world-renowned Estonian Television Girls Choir, a new work, Pandora's Gift, by American composer Mark Winges and staged by choreographer Erika Chong Shuch, and culminates in a Grand Awards Concert featuring the winners of the competitions and all 21 choruses combined to perform collaborative repertoire learned during the Festival week.

One of the world's most celebrated gatherings of young singers, the Golden Gate International Children's and Youth Choral Festival attracts choirs from all over the globe to perform, compete, and build international friendships. Founded in 1991, the Golden Gate Festival is sponsored every three years by the Piedmont East Bay Children's Choir in the San Francisco Bay Area. It remains one of the only opportunities for children's and youth choirs to meet and compete on an international field in the United States. Since its founding, the event has brought nearly 5,000 young musicians in nearly 100 choirs from more than two dozen countries together performing for more than 60,000 audience members from throughout Northern California.

Presented by Golden Gate Festival.

$18-$42.

Steelo Entertainment and La Peña present: BEYOND DREAMS with Rebel Diaz

Saturday, July 18th, 2015 - Saturday, July 18th, 2015, 7:00 pm

La Pena
3105 Shattuck Ave.

In Berkeley

$15 Adv, $20 Door
Rebel Diaz
Jasari X
Paul Flores
Aisha Fukushima
Davey D

Hosted by Raw-G & Kin Folkz

Doors are 7pm – The panel is from 7-8pm (all performers will be speaking on their personal stories).
Moderated by Davey D.

Immigrant Dreams is a series that celebrates the cultural richness and diversity that immigrants contribute to our communities through the performing arts, focusing on the musical genres of hip-hop and poetry.

The four-month long series will feature panels, performances, pre-show workshops, and community events at schools and other community sites and public spaces showcasing artists who engage the four elements of hip-hop in their work and are also immigrants with both the greater hip-hop culture and the pressing dialogue in immigration policy in the United States. The project is a cultural activist series that makes an asserted attempt to bridge the cutting-edge music of artists with their identity as immigrants uncovering some of the important historical and current day dialectic through music, dialogue, activism, and community engagement. Beyond Immigrant Dreams makes the link between immigration and the arts, and has the capacity to educate all audiences but particular young people about the contributions of immigrants to our culture and musical heritage, especially here in the Bay Area. Each event will showcase the impact of music and art by immigrants and the impact on the hip hop movement and arts and culture locally and globally.

This series builds on the 2012 NEA supported program Hip Hop Beyond Gender, a project that illuminated the inherent connection between hip hop culture and the struggle against misogyny, homophobia, and transphobia. BeyondImmigrant Dreams takes the art form of hip-hop and explores it within another civil rights struggle of time in the context of immigration, documentation, and ¡°dreamers.¡±

Nostalghia (Andrei Tarkovsky, USSR, 1983)

Saturday, July 18th, 2015, 8:30pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

New 35mm Print!

"Nostalghia is not so much a movie as a place to inhabit for two hours," J. Hoberman wrote in the Village Voice. "'Look at it as though it were the window in a train traveling through your life,' is Tarkovsky's advice." The film follows the travels of a Russian intellectual in Italy on a nebulous research project; its breathtaking procession of images parallels the protagonist's mental state, disorientation approaching the sublime. Shot mostly in Tuscany, this is Tarkovsky's own "Voyage in Italy," a pilgrimage to ruined but magical spaces—a remote chapel of miracles, a decrepit pool where, it is said, Saint Catherine of Siena once bathed—that suggest both the decay and the eternality of faith. Tarkovsky envisions a place where apocalypse may be imminent, but a single candle flame could save the world.

• Written by Tarkovsky, Tonino Guerra. Photographed by Giuseppe Lanci. With Oleg Yankovsky, Domizia Giordano, Erland Josephson, Patrizia Terreno. (125 mins, In Italian with English subtitles, Color/B&W, 35mm, From Kino Lorber)

$5.50 – BAM/PFA Members; UC Berkeley Students
$6.50 – UC Berkeley Faculty, Staff, and Retirees; Non-UC Berkeley Students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled Persons; Youth (17 & under)
$9.50 – General Admission

The Man on the Flying Trapeze (Clyde Bruckman, US, 1935)

Sunday, July 19th, 2015, 4:30pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Another of the beleaguered family men that were by this time a Fields trademark, Ambrose Wolfinger lives in quiet misery, oppressed by his second wife and her good-for-nothing relations. Ambrose may be a victim, but he's hardly innocent: apprehending a pair of burglars in his basement, he joins them in a few rounds of homemade applejack and a boozy rendition of "On the Banks of the Wabash, Far Away"; using the made-up funeral of his very-much-alive mother-in-law as an excuse to skip work for a wrestling match, he sets off a full-fledged town scandal. Despite the sketchy plot, the New York Times called this "the kind of burlesque which comes dangerously close to realism."

• Written by Ray Harris, Sam Hardy, based on a story by Charles Bogle (W. C. Fields), Hardy. Photographed by Alfred Gilks. With W. C. Fields, Mary Brian, Kathleen Howard, Grady Sutton. (66 mins, B&W, 35mm, From Universal)

Preceded by:

The Golf Specialist (Monte Brice, US, 1934)
W. C. Fields’s distracted golfer is drawn from his vaudeville routines in his first talkie.
(21 mins, B&W, 35mm, From Cohen Media)

Total running time: 87 mins

$5.50 – BAM/PFA Members; UC Berkeley Students
$6.50 – UC Berkeley Faculty, Staff, and Retirees; Non-UC Berkeley Students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled Persons; Youth (17 & under)
$9.50 – General Admission


The Tales of Hoffmann (Michael Powell, Emeric Pressburger, UK, 1951)

Sunday, July 19th, 2015, 6:30pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

New Digital Restoration!

Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger’s followup to their enormously successful ballet film The Red Shoes was this visually splendid tour-de-force: lush color, outrageous effects, Offenbach’s magnificent score, and impressive dancing highlight the three connected tales of a poet’s amorous adventures. The first concerns Olympia, a puppet passed off as a real woman to Hoffmann, who sees her torn to pieces before his eyes; the second, a Venetian courtesan, Giulietta, who captures Hoffmann’s mirror image and his soul; and the third, the tragedy of a singer kept from singing, lest she suffer the fate of her mother, who died of consumption.

• Written by Powell and Pressburger. Adapted by Dennis Arundell from the opera by Jacques Offenbach, libretto by Jules Barbier. Photographed by Christopher Challis. (133 mins, Color, DCP, From Rialto Pictures)

$5.50 – BAM/PFA Members; UC Berkeley Students
$6.50 – UC Berkeley Faculty, Staff, and Retirees; Non-UC Berkeley Students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled Persons; Youth (17 & under)
$9.50 – General Admission

Foolish Wives (Erich von Stroheim, US, 1922)

Wednesday, July 22nd, 2015, 7:30pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Live Music/Judith Rosenberg on piano

Erich von Stroheim envisioned l'amour fou as the most powerful agent of the anti-establishment. Foolish Wives pits the lure of "night, procuress of the world, voluptuous, erotic," against that most harried of institutions, marriage. The setting is Monte Carlo, place of "amour, suicide, and waves, waves, waves." There, von Stroheim's Continental confidence man steals the wives of money-mad Americans right out from under their wallets. In its pitiless irony, and shot against craggy Mediterranean cliffs outside the "Villa Amorosa" where the once-rich now cavort like skeletons in drag, Foolish Wives looks forward to Buñuel's L'age d'or. “Never was a film more revolutionary,” wrote Henri Langlois; “Stroheim opened the way for contemporary cinema.”

• Written by von Stroheim. Photographed by Ben Reynolds, William Daniels. With Stroheim, Maude George, Mae Busch, Miss Dupont. (108 mins, Silent, B&W, 35mm@24fps, From Kino Lorber)

$5.50 – BAM/PFA Members; UC Berkeley Students
$6.50 – UC Berkeley Faculty, Staff, and Retirees; Non-UC Berkeley Students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled Persons; Youth (17 & under)
$9.50 – General Admission

Stalker (Andrei Tarkovsky, USSR, 1979)

Thursday, July 23rd, 2015, 7:30pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Imported Print!

A sci-fi tale that unwinds in the environs of the soul takes the form of a nightmarish quest for nothing less than truth itself. In a plot employing the roughest outlines of a novel by Soviet sci-fi writers Arkady and Boris Strugatsky, a writer and a scientist follow a shaven-headed "stalker" into forbidden territory, a dangerous wilderness known as the Zone. Tarkovsky forces—or perhaps allows—"reality" to yield up abstract images of startling originality, and his vision of landscape is nothing less than truly mystical—these are places to be found only in humankind's spiritual Baedeker. On top of everything else, Tarkovsky was a director who truly grasped the aesthetic power of color, and this unforgettable pilgrimage is bathed in eerie sepia hues.

• Written by Arkady and Boris Strugatsky. Photographed by Aleksandr Knyazhinsky. With Aleksandr Kajdanovsky, Alisa Frejndlikh, Anatoli Solonitsyn, Nikolai Grinko. (163 mins, In Russian with English subtitles, Color, 35mm, From Contemporary Films)

$5.50 – BAM/PFA Members; UC Berkeley Students
$6.50 – UC Berkeley Faculty, Staff, and Retirees; Non-UC Berkeley Students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled Persons; Youth (17 & under)
$9.50 – General Admission

Hiroshima mon amour (Alain Resnais, France, 1959)

Friday, July 24th, 2015, 7:00pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

In Memory of Alain Resnais (1922–2014)
New Digital Restoration!

“A cornerstone film of the French New Wave, Alain Resnais’ first feature is one of the most influential films of all time.”—Criterion

In Hiroshima, a French actress (Emmanuèlle Riva) working on an antiwar film meets a Japanese architect (Eiji Okada). They become lovers but their encounter only revives memories of the war, revealing that the woman is her past, the man, his. Their struggle to come to terms with the idea that life goes on is reflected in images from a collective memory in which the film's pacifist subtheme is skillfully developed. The seamless integration of past and present, the poetic fusion of music to text and of image to the clipped poetry of dialogue, were shared tropes of director Resnais and screenwriter Marguerite Duras.

• Written by Marguerite Duras. Photographed by Sacha Vierny, Michio Takahashi. With Emmanuèle Riva, Eiji Okada, Bernard Fresson, Stella Dassas. (90 mins, In French with English subtitles, B&W, DCP, From Rialto Pictures)

$5.50 – BAM/PFA Members; UC Berkeley Students
$6.50 – UC Berkeley Faculty, Staff, and Retirees; Non-UC Berkeley Students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled Persons; Youth (17 & under)
$9.50 – General Admission

Oakland East Bay Gay Mens Chorus presents "Divas Anyone?"

Friday, July 24th, 2015, 7:00pm

Freight & Salvage
2020 Addison Street

In Berkeley

The Oakland–East Bay Gay Men’s Chorus announces its Summer Pops concert series “Divas, Anyone?” under the direction of Carl Pantle, Music Director. The chorus is delighted to welcome the lovely and talented Countess Katya Smirnoff-Skyy (aka J. Conrad Frank) as our celebrity emcee. This will be a fabulous and fun concert, presenting a well-rounded and gloriously entertaining show. The performances pay tribute to our favorite divas (and a few divos!) including Martha Wash (“It’s Raining Men”), Lady Gaga (“Born This Way”), Michael Jackson (“The Man in the Mirror”) and, of course, Judy Garland (“The Man That Got Away”), just to name a few.

Queen Kelly (Erich von Stroheim, US, 1931)

Friday, July 24th, 2015, 8:50pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Safeguarded by Langlois in the 1950s and restored in 1983, Queen Kelly is one of the most infamous unfinished film maudits in history. Erich von Stroheim’s masterpiece was originally funded by Gloria Swanson’s production company until shooting shut down for good in 1929. In a debauched Central European kingdom, a mad queen must wed a notorious libertine, who instead falls for a young nun (Swanson). “Queen Kelly takes us into a world that would have definitely disappeared without Stroheim . . . a perverse world, crueller than Sade’s, a vanished world of which Stroheim brought out the phantoms,” wrote Langlois. “Queen Kelly takes us into a universe of incest and solemn boredom, degeneracy and absolute power, complacency and complicities left unpunished, a universe made for creating monsters, semi-madmen, victims, slaves, valets.”

• Written by von Stroheim. Photographed by Gordon Pollock, Paul Ivano. With Gloria Swanson, Seena Owen, Walter Byron, Sylvia Ashton. (74 mins, Silent with music track, B&W, 35mm, From Kino Lorber)

$5.50 – BAM/PFA Members; UC Berkeley Students
$6.50 – UC Berkeley Faculty, Staff, and Retirees; Non-UC Berkeley Students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled Persons; Youth (17 & under)
$9.50 – General Admission

Oakland East Bay Gay Mens Chorus presents 'Divas Anyone?'

Friday, July 24th, 2015 - Sunday, July 26th, 2015, July 24, 7pm; July 26, 1pm

Freight & Salvage Coffeehouse
2020 Addison Street

In Berkeley

The Oakland-East Bay Gay Men's Chorus announces its Summer Pops concert series "Divas, Anyone?" under the direction of Carl Pantle, Music Director. The chorus is delighted to welcome the lovely and talented Countess Katya Smirnoff-Skyy (aka J. Conrad Frank) as our celebrity emcee. This will be a fabulous and fun concert, presenting a well-rounded and gloriously entertaining show. The performances pay tribute to our favorite divas (and a few divos!) including Martha Wash ("It's Raining Men"), Lady Gaga ("Born This Way"), Michael Jackson ("The Man in the Mirror") and, of course, Judy Garland ("The Man That Got Away"), just to name a few.

Presented by Oakland East Bay Gay Mens Chorus.

$22 in advance; $26 at the door.

Imitation of Life (John M. Stahl, US, 1934)

Saturday, July 25th, 2015, 6:00pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Stahl’s was the first adaptation of Fannie Hurst’s tearjerking tale of two working mothers, one black, one white. Widowed Bea (Claudette Colbert) begins as a syrup saleswoman and eventually builds a pancake-mix empire using the special recipe of her maid and best friend, Delilah (Louise Beavers). Imitation of Life has been both praised and condemned for its treatment of race; its engagement with the Mammy stereotype is complicated. “We’s gone a long way,” Delilah tells Bea, but even if “Aunt Delilah” is the face on the pancake box, she still sleeps in the basement while Bea retires upstairs. And while both women make sacrifices for their daughters, Delilah takes the deeper losses. Unlike Douglas Sirk, who made another adaptation 25 years later, Stahl made a point of casting an African American actress in the role of Delilah’s light-skinned daughter Peola. Fredi Washington plays Peola’s desperate attempts to pass for white as an outraged refusal to accept her “place”—maybe the strongest proof that this movie is not just selling syrup.

• Written by William Hurlbut, based on the novel by Fannie Hurst. Photographed by Merritt Gerstad. With Claudette Colbert, Warren William, Louise Beavers, Fredi Washington. (116 mins, B&W, 35mm, From Universal)

$5.50 – BAM/PFA Members; UC Berkeley Students
$6.50 – UC Berkeley Faculty, Staff, and Retirees; Non-UC Berkeley Students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled Persons; Youth (17 & under)
$9.50 – General Admission


The Sacrifice (Andrei Tarkovsky, Sweden/France, 1986)

Saturday, July 25th, 2015, 8:15pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

New 35mm Print!

(Offret)
Filmed in Sweden, The Sacrifice is set in Tarkovsky country: a vast, airy home on a remote Baltic island whose shores evoke the edge of the world—much as the green acre in Solaris seemed a planet unto itself, the farther one got from Earth. Tarkovsky's protagonist here is on a journey inward. A retired actor, Alexander (Erland Josephson) finds himself in retreat from the world on the occasion of his birthday celebration, elaborately orchestrated by his bourgeois family. The television and a cold wind bring news of nuclear war—and still, the family survives. But for Alexander, it is the moment he has waited for all his life. He makes a bold pact with his god, in order to save his son. Sven Nykvist's cinematography faultlessly captures Tarkovsky's "distilled, hauntingly allusive world . . . etched in a pale wintry light, and shadowy, cavernous interiors—an ambivalent, unstable grayscape that hovers in the borderland between mind and matter, idea and image" (New Yorker Films). Tarkovsky, who was suffering from cancer when he made the film and who died in 1987, in this film left a profound last testament, dedicated to his own son. "The issue I raise," he said, "is one that to my mind is most crucial: The absence in our culture of room for a spiritual existence . . . I wanted to show that a man can renew his ties to life by renewing his covenant with himself and with the source of his soul."

• Written by Tarkovsky. Photographed by Sven Nykvist. With Erland Josephson, Susan Fleetwood, Valérie Mairesse, Allan Edwall. (149 mins, In Swedish with English subtitles, Color, 35mm, From Kino Lorber)

$5.50 – BAM/PFA Members; UC Berkeley Students
$6.50 – UC Berkeley Faculty, Staff, and Retirees; Non-UC Berkeley Students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled Persons; Youth (17 & under)
$9.50 – General Admission

Zal Top – Jazz Showcase from Senegal

Saturday, July 25th, 2015 - Saturday, July 25th, 2015, @ 9:00 pm - 10:00 pm

La Pena
3105 Shattuck Ave.

In Berkeley

Jazz drummer Zal Top was born and raised in Dakar, Senegal. During his high school years, he spent his free time listening to soul, pop, rock, funk, as well as popular African music from the 1970s. Throughout the next 30 years, Zal worked with several different musicians that enhanced his knowledge and skills in the area.

In 2010 Zal launched his solo career and founded his newest group, the Zal Top Project, which features some of the best jazz talent from both the US and Dakar. The group blends jazz, blues, Afro-beat, funk, and Latin jazz into a true multicultural fusion, a symbiosis of modern grooves and African melodies.

Oakland East Bay Gay Mens Chorus presents "Divas Anyone?"

Sunday, July 26th, 2015, 1:00pm

Freight & Salvage
2020 Addison Street

In Berkeley

The Oakland–East Bay Gay Men’s Chorus announces its Summer Pops concert series “Divas, Anyone?” under the direction of Carl Pantle, Music Director. The chorus is delighted to welcome the lovely and talented Countess Katya Smirnoff-Skyy (aka J. Conrad Frank) as our celebrity emcee. This will be a fabulous and fun concert, presenting a well-rounded and gloriously entertaining show. The performances pay tribute to our favorite divas (and a few divos!) including Martha Wash (“It’s Raining Men”), Lady Gaga (“Born This Way”), Michael Jackson (“The Man in the Mirror”) and, of course, Judy Garland (“The Man That Got Away”), just to name a few.

Mexican Tardeada (In The Lounge)

Sunday, July 26th, 2015 - Sunday, July 26th, 2015, 3:00 pm - 6:00 pm

La Pena
3105 Shattuck Ave.

In Berkeley

A monthly Sunday afternoon Mexican music jam in the café lounge. The Tardeadas are informal family-oriented gathering of musicians and Mexican music aficionados. Bring your Tejano/Norteño acordeon, guitar, bass, bajo, or percussion y aquí nos vemos!



Free/Donations encouraged

Georges Méliès Shorts (France, 1897–1906)

Sunday, July 26th, 2015, 5:00pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Digital Restorations!
Live Music/ Judith Rosenberg on piano

“Cinema will perhaps have to wait centuries more before finding another genius whose childlike soul will, like Méliès, make light of its phantasmagorias.”—Henri Langlois

The father of cinema, the delicate clockmaker of so many subtle mechanisms, the inventor of all the special effects and processes, fascinated by extravaganzas and miraculously freed from the laws of gravity, was a marvelous draughtsman and an admirable colorist . . . (Georges Méliès) was the genius who managed to conjure cinematographic art out of nothing, transforming a machine intended for recording reality into a box of magic from which gushed the impossible.

Après le bal, le tub (1897, 1 min, Silent, Hand-painted color, DCP)

L’illusionniste fin de siècle (1899, 1:30 mins, Silent, Hand-painted color, DCP)

La chrysalide et le papillon d’or (1900, 2:30 mins, Silent, Hand-painted color, DCP)

Le royaume des fées (1903, 17 mins, Silent, Hand-painted color, DCP)

Le merveilleux éventail vivant (1904, 5 mins, Silent, Hand-painted color, DCP)

Le raid de Paris-Monte-Carlo en automobile (1905, 11 mins, Silent,Hand-painted color, DCP)

Le bourreau turc (1904, 3 mins, Silent, Hand-painted color, DCP)

La fée carabosse (1906, 12 mins, Silent, Hand-painted color, DCP)

Parlons cinema—A propos du cinéma dans la résistance (excerpts) (Harry Fischbach, Canada, 1976, 5 mins)

The films come from private collections and those of Madeleine Malthête-Méliès, who generously donated her husband’s nitrate films to La Cinémathèque française. The handpainted films were restored by La Cinémathèque française in 2013 with the Eclair Group.

Total running time: 58 mins


$5.50 – BAM/PFA Members; UC Berkeley Students
$6.50 – UC Berkeley Faculty, Staff, and Retirees; Non-UC Berkeley Students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled Persons; Youth (17 & under)
$9.50 – General Admission

The Keys of the Kingdom (John M. Stahl, US, 1944)

Sunday, July 26th, 2015, 6:30pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Studio Print!

In telling the story of a Catholic priest sent to a remote mission in China, Stahl is less concerned with religious doctrine, politics, or culture than with the nuances of individual character. The young Gregory Peck garnered an Oscar nomination for his performance as Father Francis Chisholm, a humble Scotsman who refuses to buy converts but wins them anyway through compassion, tolerance, and common sense. Any risk of sentimental sanctimony is relieved by Thomas Mitchell as an endearing, unrepentant atheist and Vincent Price as an officious cleric whose ambition defines the difference between a career and a calling. 

• Written by Joseph L. Mankiewicz, Nunnally Johnson, based on the novel by A. J. Cronin. Photographed by Arthur Miller. With Gregory Peck, Thomas Mitchell, Vincent Price, Rosa Stradner. (137 mins, B&W, 35mm, From 20th Century Fox Library, permission Criterion Pictures)

$5.50 – BAM/PFA Members; UC Berkeley Students
$6.50 – UC Berkeley Faculty, Staff, and Retirees; Non-UC Berkeley Students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled Persons; Youth (17 & under)
$9.50 – General Admission

Karikatura

Sunday, July 26th, 2015 - Sunday, July 26th, 2015, 8:00 pm

La Pena
3105 Shattuck Ave.

In Berkeley

Karikatura makes life-affirming, body-shaking music that moves people around the world. While the band has toured everywhere from Japan to Brazil, New York City is home. With bright horns, socially conscious lyrics and booty-bouncing beats, Karikatura delivers real songs that transcend style and genre. An organic synthesis of all the music heard blasting out of car windows and shops onto the streets of NYC, Karikatura lives where cumbia meets hip-hop, reggae meets klezmer and indie-rock meets afrobeat. Neither purist nor revivalist, this is music of the present, for the future. The band just released its debut full-length album, Eyes Wide, on Ropeadope Records, following up two EPs and DIY tours of Europe, Asia and South America.

The Quince Tree Sun (Víctor Erice, Spain, 1992)

Wednesday, July 29th, 2015, 7:00pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

In Conversation/Víctor Erice and Richard Peña
Archival Print!
International Critics’ Prize, 1992 Cannes Film Festival!

(El sol del membrillo, aka Dream of Light, Quince Tree of the Sun)
The Quince Tree Sun is an exquisite, lingering portrait of the Spanish realist painter Antonio López García as he paints a single work: a picture of a quince tree in his backyard, which he planted years ago and which now stimulates thoughts on light, painting, and process; on death; on what we know of the world and how we know it. Erice's film is itself a "painting from life," taking in López's conversations with friends and his quiet musings, his paintings of Madrid, and the director's own images of this sumptuous city. "Erice's method is modest, yet his film manages to achieve a mesmerizing intensity. The purity and breadth of this meticulous study are all the more gratifying in view of its unprepossessing style . . . It becomes a thoughtful, delicate inquiry into the essence of the artistic process, and a tribute to the beauty and mutability of nature. Erice's film is . . . like its subject, one of a kind" (Janet Maslin, New York Times).

• Written by Erice, Antonio López. Photographed by Javier Aguirresarobe. With Antonio López, María Moreno, Enrique Gran, Jos. Carretero. (138 mins, In Spanish with English subtitles, Color, 35mm, From Filmoteca Española, permission Rosebud Films)

$5.50 – BAM/PFA Members; UC Berkeley Students
$6.50 – UC Berkeley Faculty, Staff, and Retirees; Non-UC Berkeley Students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled Persons; Youth (17 & under)
$9.50 – General Admission

Víctor Erice-Abbas Kiarostami: Correspondences (Spain/Iran, 2005–07)

Thursday, July 30th, 2015, 7:30pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

In Conversation/Víctor Erice and Richard Peña

Created for an innovative museum exhibition in Barcelona and Paris that paired the works of filmmakers Víctor Erice and Abbas Kiarostami, Correspondences is composed of ten “filmed letters” between the two great masters. As in their other films, children, imagination, and the creative process take center stage; in one, the young grandchildren of the painter from Erice’s The Quince Tree Sun show off their own unique styles, while in another nine-year-olds in a rural Spanish classroom watch Kiarostami’s Where is the Friend’s Home? Kiarostami follows an “escaped quince” from the Spanish film to a neighborhood in Iran, and plays with artistic perspective in another. “Modern messages in a bottle” (Miguel Marias), these not-so-simple video letters recognize no international stamps or borders, only the artistic and personal links between individuals.

• Written by Erice, Kiarostami. (97 mins, In Spanish and Farsi with English subtitles, Color, DigiBeta, From Nautilus Films)

$5.50 – BAM/PFA Members; UC Berkeley Students
$6.50 – UC Berkeley Faculty, Staff, and Retirees; Non-UC Berkeley Students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled Persons; Youth (17 & under)
$9.50 – General Admission

El Sur (Víctor Erice, Spain, 1983)

Friday, July 31st, 2015, 7:30pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Archival Print!
In Person/Víctor Erice

(The South)
A young girl comes of age amid the long silences and shadows of her family’s wintry northern exile in Erice’s long-awaited follow-up to The Spirit of the Beehive, which continues that work’s exploration of childhood fantasies and adult realities in a similarly hushed, becalmed tone. In the solitude of her parents’ northern home, a young daughter seeks the secrets that the south—and the past—hold. Politics, the Spanish Civil War, the breaking of family ties, or illicit loves: all seem possible in her father’s ever-growing sadness, and her mother’s deepening sighs. A Rembrandt painting come to life, El Sur is a work of muted colors and hushed tones, where a life worth living already seems to have come and gone. “A film of love and sorrow suffused with an appreciation of life’s beauty” (LA Times), El Sur tracks a nation’s and a generation’s divide.

• Written by Erice, based on a story by Adelaida García Morales. With Omero Antonutti, Sonsoles Aranguren, Icíar Bollaín, Lola Cardona. (95 mins, In Spanish with English subtitles, Color, 35mm, From Filmoteca Española, permission Video Mercury)

$5.50 – BAM/PFA Members; UC Berkeley Students
$6.50 – UC Berkeley Faculty, Staff, and Retirees; Non-UC Berkeley Students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled Persons; Youth (17 & under)
$9.50 – General Admission

Zero for Conduct (Jean Vigo, France, 1933) Free screening!

Friday, July 31st, 2015, 9:30pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Free Screening!

(Zéro de conduite)
Vigo was often called the cinema’s Rimbaud, not only for his youth, but also for his passionate sincerity, rich imagery, and directness of language. Zero for Conduct is based on very personal childhood experiences; it is cruel, playful and exuberant, and filled with unexpected gags and observations. Set in a boarding school, the loose but emotionally charged story creates a model of rebellion, portraying not only the petty, dictatorial regime of a school, but the dynamics, fervor and delirium of revolt as well. It is poetry, wild in hatred and tender in remembrance.

• Written by Vigo. Photographed by Boris Kaufman. With Jean Dasté, Louis Lefebvre, Robert Le Flon, Delphin. (41 mins, In French with English subtitles, B&W, 35mm, From Janus Films/Criterion Collection)

City Lights (Charlie Chaplin, US, 1931)

Saturday, August 1st, 2015, 4:00pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Part of It’s a Wrap! celebrating our final weekend in the PFA Theater.

Tracing the Tramp’s efforts to help a blind flower seller, City Lights is Chaplin’s most balanced and potent blend of humor and poetic pathos, with a strong strand of class consciousness. Episodes of pointed comedy, beginning with the Tramp unveiled in the lap of a statue at a pompous civic gathering, lead fluidly to almost unbearably poignant moments, such as when the flower girl at last recognizes her impoverished benefactor. The film was two years and $2 million in the making. By the time it was released, Hollywood had made the transition to sound, but Chaplin determined that City Lights would be free of dialogue, with a score composed and carefully supervised by him. His perfectionism paid off in a box-office triumph, and a film that many critics consider the pinnacle of his art. It is a film for which Víctor Erice has felt "complicity" throughout his life; he describes its finale as "one of the simplest, most intense, and most revealing images of the whole history of cinema."

• Written by Chaplin. Photographed by Roland Totheroh, Gordon Pollock. With Chaplin, Virginia Cherrill, Florence Lee, Harry Myers. (87 mins, Silent with music track, B&W, 35mm, From Janus Films/Criterion Collection)

$5.50 – BAM/PFA Members; UC Berkeley Students
$6.50 – UC Berkeley Faculty, Staff, and Retirees; Non-UC Berkeley Students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled Persons; Youth (17 & under)
$9.50 – General Admission

The Spirit of the Beehive (Víctor Erice, Spain, 1973)

Saturday, August 1st, 2015, 6:00pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

In Person/Víctor Erice
Part of It’s a Wrap! celebrating our final weekend in the PFA Theater.
Followed by a reception with refreshments and live music!!

(El espiritu de la colmena)
Spain, 1943, the end of the civil war: in a rural village made of little more than train tracks, mud, and sky live two sisters, the quiet, moon-eyed Ana (Ana Torrent) and the older, confident Isabel (Isabel Telleria). A traveling road show brings the magic of cinema, specifically Frankenstein, into their long days; while their elderly father tends to bees and poetry, and their beautiful mother dreams of a love lost long ago, the two children wonder over ghosts and outcasts, monsters that become all too real once an actual fugitive enters their lives. Grounded in the political realities of 1940s Spain, and in an autumnal natural reality of plowed fields, abandoned farmhouses, and empty streets, Spirit attunes itself to the phantom realms of its child protagonists, where signs and wonders are everywhere, and new worlds await just outside the family home. “The best Spanish film ever made . . . There has probably never been a more extraordinary view of a child on a movie screen” (Richard Eder, NY Times).

• Written by Erice, Angel Fernandez Santos. Photographed by Luis Cuadrado. With Ana Torrent, Isabel Telleria, Fernando Fernan Gomez, Teresa Gimpera. (95 mins, In Spanish with English subtitles, Color, 35mm, From Janus Films/Criterion Collection)

$5.50 – BAM/PFA Members; UC Berkeley Students
$6.50 – UC Berkeley Faculty, Staff, and Retirees; Non-UC Berkeley Students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled Persons; Youth (17 & under)
$9.50 – General Admission


Bicycle Thief (Vittorio de Sica, Italy, 1948)

Saturday, August 1st, 2015, 8:45pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Part of It’s a Wrap! celebrating our final weekend in the PFA Theater.
Come early for a reception with live music and refreshments!

(Ladri di biciclette, aka The Bicycle Thieves)
De Sica’s neorealist tale finds the despair of postwar Italy evident in the faces of its men. Though the film also explores how women cope with poverty, it devotes most of its energy to documenting Rome’s streets and the depressed, unemployed men who populate them, anxiously waiting for work. One such man is Antonio Ricci (Lamberto Maggiorani), who miraculously lands a job hanging movie posters around town. Things go awry after Antonio’s bicycle is stolen, forcing him and his young son Bruno to scour the city. For De Sica, the severity of Antonio’s ordeal is as much a crisis of masculinity as it is one of economics; Maggiorani’s melancholy eyes and hardened face express the hardship of a generation of men beaten by hunger and dim prospects. Youthful Bruno tries to keep them upbeat, but as father and son soon learn firsthand, a desperate man can sink to great depths. (Jonathan L. Knapp) Víctor Erice saw the film as an adolescent: "For the first time I saw realism in cinema, I saw faces like those I saw in the street, I saw situations that I could recognize. So that's probably the point where I could say I left innocence behind and moved to a more conscious period."

• Written by Cesare Zavattini, based on a novel by Luigi Bartolini. Photographed by Carlo Montouri. With Lamberto Maggiorani, Lianella Carnel, Enzo Staiola. (93 mins, In Italian with English subtitles, B&W, 35mm, From Corinth Films)

$5.50 – BAM/PFA Members; UC Berkeley Students
$6.50 – UC Berkeley Faculty, Staff, and Retirees; Non-UC Berkeley Students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled Persons; Youth (17 & under)
$9.50 – General Admission

The Kid (Charles Chaplin, US, 1921) w/ Charlie Chaplin Impersonator!

Sunday, August 2nd, 2015, 3:30pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Part of It’s a Wrap! celebrating our final weekend in the PFA Theater.
Followed by a demonstration-workshop in the art of pantomime with Charlie Chaplin impersonator Damian Blake. Bring the whole family to learn how to walk like Chaplin!

With The Kid, Chaplin successfully established the fusion of slapstick and pathos that would serve him so well in years to come. He also found perhaps his ideal costar, six-year-old Jackie Coogan, capable of both brilliant comic mimicry and unaffected emotion. In a genuinely squalid slum, the Little Tramp stumbles upon an abandoned baby. After a few attempts to rid himself of this unexpected responsibility, he settles into his paternal role, instructing the child in the con game of survival—until the authorities arrive to break up their happy if dilapidated home. Chaplin’s own childhood experiences of poverty and abandonment come through in the film’s vividly imagined settings and its intensity of feeling.

• Written by Chaplin. With Chaplin, Jackie Coogan, Edna Purviance. (54 mins, Silent with music track, B&W, 35mm, From Janus Films/Criterion Collection)

$5.50 – BAM/PFA Members; UC Berkeley Students
$6.50 – UC Berkeley Faculty, Staff, and Retirees; Non-UC Berkeley Students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled Persons; Youth (17 & under)
$9.50 – General Admission

Recent Short Films of Víctor Erice (Spain, 2002–12)

Sunday, August 2nd, 2015, 6:00pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

In Person/ Víctor Erice
Part of It’s a Wrap! celebrating our final weekend in the PFA Theater.

In recent years Erice has turned to the art of the short film, crafting several works for omnibus features that are nonetheless? able to stand on their own. A family of Spanish farmers attempt to help a sick child in Lifeline, part of 2002’s Godard/Kaurismaki/Herzog/et al. omnibus on time and fate, Ten Minutes Older: The Trumpet. Ana Torrent (The Spirit of the Beehive) stars in Ana, tres minutos, from 3.11 Sense of Home, a tribute project to the 2011 Japanese earthquake that features contributions from Naomi Kawase and others. Light filters through the Broken Windows of an abandoned Portuguese factory while former workers reminisce in Erice’s section of Centro Historico, which spotlights the city of Guimarães and includes pieces by Pedro Costa, Aki Kaurismaki, and Manoel de Oliveira. Revisiting the first film Erice ever saw (the Sherlock Holmes potboiler The Scarlet Claw), La morte rouge meditates on fiction, reality, history, and cinema above all. It was one of the only shorts named in Time Out’s 101 Films of the 2000s.

Lifeline (Spain, 2002, 11 mins, In Spanish with English and Russian subtitles, Color, 35mm, Courtesy TIFF's Film Reference Library, permission Nautilus Films)

Ana, tres minutos (Spain, 2011, 3 mins, In Spanish with English electronic titling, Color, DVD, From Nautilus Films)

Broken Windows (Portugal, 2012, 35 mins, In Portuguese with English subtitles, Color, DCP, From Nautilus Films)

La morte rouge (Spain, 2006, 32 mins, In Spanish with English electronic titling, Color, DigiBeta, From Nautilus Films)

Total running time: 81 mins

Tokyo Story (Yasuziro Ozu, Japan, 1953)

Sunday, August 2nd, 2015, 8:15pm

Pacific Film Archive Theater
2575 Bancroft Way

In Berkeley

Part of It’s a Wrap! celebrating our final weekend in the PFA Theater.

(Tokyo monogatari)
Setsuko Hara anchors one of the greatest of all Japanese films with one of the greatest of all performances, as a warm-hearted, becalmed, yet utterly determined young woman. Tokyo Story is about the gap between generations in a Japanese family. It tells a simple, sad story of an elderly couple who travel to Tokyo to visit their two married children, only to find themselves politely ushered off to a hot springs resort. There, the mother dies, leaving only their widowed daughter-in-law (Hara) to care for the father. “Two generations, a simple story that allows all the characters to change places, a pervading delineation of high summer, and the deceptive simplicity of the film’s style—all these combine to create a picture so Japanese and at the same time so personal, and hence so universal in its appeal, that it becomes a masterpiece” (Donald Richie).

• Written by Ozu, Kogo Noda. Photographed by Yuharu Atsuta. With Chishu Ryu, Chieko Higashiyama, Setsuko Hara, So Yamamura. (140 mins, In Japanese with English subtitles, B&W, 35mm, From Janus Films/Criterion Collection)

$5.50 – BAM/PFA Members; UC Berkeley Students
$6.50 – UC Berkeley Faculty, Staff, and Retirees; Non-UC Berkeley Students; Senior citizens (65 & over); Disabled Persons; Youth (17 & under)
$9.50 – General Admission

AXIS Dance Company Summer Intensive & Physically Integrated Dance Teacher Training

Monday, August 3rd, 2015 - Tuesday, August 11th, 2015, 10am-5pm

The Malonga Casquelourd Center for The Arts
1428 Alice Street Suite 200 Oakland, CA 94612

In

Join us for an explorative dance intensive with AXIS Dance Company. Learn new skills in three different modules derived from the company’s working ethos and repertoire that will enhance and develop your own practice in improvisation, choreography and performance. New this year, a specialized teacher training for dance teachers and experienced artists wanting to enhance their skills and working methods in inclusive dance and translation for dancers with physical disabilities.

The Producers

Thursday, August 6th, 2015 - Sunday, August 16th, 2015, 8:00 pm

Woodminster Amphitheater
Joaquin Miller Park, 3300 Joaquin Miller Road

In Oakland

Mel Brooks' classic cult comedy film is now a big Broadway musical, once again setting the standard for outrageous humor. A down-on-his-luck Broadway producer and his mild-mannered accountant come up with a scheme to produce the most notorious flop in history, thereby bilking their "little old lady" backers out of millions of dollars. Only one thing goes wrong: the gloriously offensive Springtime For Hitler is a smash hit! The Producers skewers Broadway traditions and takes no prisoners. Adult oriented humor.

Performed under the stars by a large cast and a live professional orchestra, in Oakland's beautiful Joaquin Miller Park. Come early and enjoy a picnic with your family, a walk in this hillside park, and the beautiful bay views. As the sun sets, take your seats in the amphitheater and enjoy an evening of music and magic under the stars.

Thursday, August 6 is the Preview (final dress rehearsal) and all tickets are $18 at the door. No assigned seats or reserved picnic tables, no advance sales, no promos or discounts. Regular performances are August 7, 8, 9, 13, 14, 15, and 16. Tickets are $28-$59, with discounts for children, seniors, and groups. Our Kids Come Free program allows an adult paying full price to bring a child or teen (up to 16) to any regular performance (not previews) for free.

(Though for The Producers, be aware that there is a great deal of sexual humor, most appropriate for adults and more sophisticated kids and teens.)

Collect! Exhibition Opening Reception and Annual Fundraiser

Saturday, September 12th, 2015 - Saturday, September 26th, 2015, 5 pm - 9 pm

Berkeley Art Center
1275 Walnut Street

In Berkeley

Collect! Exhibition Opening Reception and Annual Silent Auction Fundraiser

Exhibition Dates: September 12 - 26, 2015

Opening Reception: Saturday, September 26, 5 p.m. - 9 p.m.

Raise a glass to the burgeoning local artist community at Berkeley Art Center’s Collect!, the organization’s largest annual event. Works from the Bay Area’s most exciting artists will be exhibited and up for auction, enjoyed with a glass of wine and delicious food. Bring home your favorite piece and support artists in the community!

The event is free and open to the public. A ticketed Auction Fundraiser will be held Saturday, September 26 from 5 - 9 p.m., including a VIP Reception from 5 - 6 p.m.

All proceeds from Collect! will support Berkeley Art Center’s exhibitions and public programs. Funds from this year’s event directly support year-round programming, including Programs for Young Artists at BAC.

Collect! Ticket Information:
$40 in advance, $45 at the door
VIP Tickets: $70 in advance, $75 at the door

For more information go to www.berkeleyartcenter.org/collect-2015

Berkeley Art Center
1275 Walnut Street
Berkeley, CA 94709
510-644-6893

2015 Pleasanton Harvest Festival

Friday, September 18th, 2015 - Sunday, September 20th, 2015, 10am - 6pm

Alameda County Fairgrounds, Pleasanton CA
4501 Pleasanton Ave

In

The Pleasanton Harvest Festival, happening September 18-20 at the Alameda County Fairgrounds, is ringing in the fall shopping season by offering attendees thousands of unique, handcrafted gifts in a fun and festive setting.

The Harvest Festival is a one-of-a-kind event that offers shoppers the chance to browse thousands of American handmade arts and crafts, including original art, clothing, blown glass, ceramics, photography, specialty foods and more. Guests can visit hundreds of booths, getting their purchases personalized and meeting the artists who individually made each product.

Throughout the weekend there is fabulous, continual live entertainment at the outdoor stage. John Park will be performing his popular "Funny Waiter" show where he spins plates and has the audience participating in his hilarious tricks, and the Hot Rods Band will get the crowd on their feet and dancing with their tribute to early rock and roll hits of the 50's and 60's.

This year, the Pleasanton Harvest Festival is proud to welcome its new official charity, the Crown Monarchs Youth Cheer and Dance Team. The Crown Monarchs will receive half of the proceeds from all shopping bags sold at the event and will also be hosting the interactive KidZone this year. The Pleasanton Harvest Festival® is also supporting the Alameda County Community Food Bank by offering $2 off admission to anyone who brings a monetary donation or non-perishable food items to the show.

For tickets and more information, please visit http://www.harvestfestival.com

Art in Nature Festival

Sunday, September 20th, 2015 - Sunday, September 20th, 2015, 11am to 5pm

Redwood Regional Park
7867 Redwood Rd, Oakland, CA 94619

In Oakland

Stroll along the mile-long Stream Trail, experience art in nature, and delve into the nature of art throughout 12 theme areas featuring music, dance, sculpture, painting, martial arts, poetry, body painting, circus arts, theater, visual arts, storytelling, arts & crafts, kids activities and more.

Art in Nature Festival is an interdisciplinary, interactive, site‑specific immersion into art and nature and the beauty of creating. It invites the spontaneous artistic co‑creation of festival participants and 200+ professional artists.

The festival is wheelchair accessible, bike and dog friendly, and non-commercial. The best way to get to the Festival is by using the free Shuttle Busses at Merritt College.

More info: www.artinnaturefestival.org



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